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October 04, 1956 - Image 8

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Michigan Daily, 1956-10-04

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I1

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4,1954

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

TAKE OVER NEWSPAPERS:
'U' Students 'Perk Up' Two Weeklies

1-

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(Continued from Page 4)

and each has an annual value of 550
pounds, with an extra 200 pounds for
married men. The deadline for the ap-
plications is Oct. 31. Information on
where to write for applications may be
obtained from the Offices of the Grad-
uate School.
The following student sponsored so-,
cial events are approved for the coming
weekend. Social chairmen are reminded
that requests for approval for social,
events are due in the Office of Student
Affairs not later than 12:00 noon on
the Tuesday prior to the event.
Oct. 5: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta
Theta Phi, Martha Cook Bldg., Phi Delta
Phi, Stockwell Hall, Taylor.
Oct. 6 (one o'clock closing): Acacia,
Allen Rumsey, Alpha Epsilon P, Alpha
Kappa Kappa, Alpha Kappa Psi, Alpha
Sigma Phi, Alpha Tau Omega, Ander-
son, Beta Theta P, Chinese Students
Club, Cooley, Delta Chi, Delta Kappa
Epsilon & Sigma Phi Society, Delta
Sigma Delta, Delta Sigma Pi, Delta
Sigma Phi, Delta Tau Delta, Delta The-
ta Phi, Delta Upsilon, Evans Scholars,
Gamberg, Greene, Jordan, Kappa Alpha
Psi, 'Kappa Sigma, Lloyd, Michigan
Christian Fellowship, Newberry, Nu
Sigma Nu Theta Alpha Kappa, Phi Chi,
Phi Delta Phi, Phi Delta Theta, Phi
Gamma Delta & Zeta Beta Tau, Phi
Kappa Psi, Phi Kappa Sigma, Phi Kap-
pa Tau, Phi Rho Sigma, Phi Sigma
Delta, Pi Lambda Phi, Psi Omega, Scott
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Alpha Mu,
Sigma Chi, Sigma Chi Epsilon, Strauss,
Tau Kappa Epsilon, Theta Chi, Theta
Xi, Triangle Trigon, Van Tyne, Zeta
Psi.
Oct. 7: Adelia Cheever, Phi Delta Phi.
lectures
The. Rev. John Ellison of Winchester,
Mass., wh organized and programmed
the development of the concordance for
the Revised Standard Version of the
Bible on the UNIVAC, will give a dis-
cussion of the production of concor-
dances on high-speed data processors,
Thurs., Oct. 4, Room 3201, Angell Hall,
3 p.m.
Concerts
Choral Union Series. Claramae Tur-
ner, Metropolitan Opera contralto, will
take the place of Kurt Baumat the
opening concert of the Choral Union
Series Thurs., Oct. 4hat 8:30 p.m. in
Hill Auditorium. She will join with
Herva Nelli, soprano, also of the Metro-
politan Opera, in a program of solos
and duets from operas.
Tickets are availablesat the offices of
the University Musical Society in Bur-
ton Tower daily. They will also be on
sale after 7:00 p.m. on the night of the
concert in the Hill Auditorium box of-
fice.
Carillon Recital by Percival Price,
University Carillonneur, 7:15 this eve-
ning, Burton Memorial Tower. Prof.
Preie will continue his series of reper-
toire of De Gruytters and his contem-
poraries. Other recitals in the series
will be preformed Thursday evenings at
7:15 until Nov. 8.
Academic Notices
Engineers: "Employment Interview-
ing" will be discussed by Professor John
G..Young, Assistant to the Dean of En-
gineering, at a meeting open to all en-
gineering students. Thursday, October
4th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 311, West En-
gineering Building.
401 Interdiscipinary Seminar on the
Application of Mathematics to Social
Science, Room 3401, Mason Hall, 3:00-
4:30 p.m. Oct. 4, Patrick Suppes (Stan-
ford Unive., on "Axiomatiza bl-
ity Theories of Measurement."
Makeup Examination in Economics
51, 52, 53, and 54, Mon. Oct.'15, 2:00-5:00
p.m., in Room 20 Economics Building.
Please leave your name with the Sec-
retary of the Department.
Seminar in Applied Mathematics
(Math 347) Thurs., Oct. 4, at 4:00 p.m.
in Room 247, West Engineering Bldg.
Prof. R. C. F. Bartels will speak on
"Stability and Convergence of a Sys-
tem of Finite Difference Equataons."
Refreshments served at 3:30 in Room
274 West Engineering Bldg.
Doctoral Examination for David Willis
Martin, Physics; thesis: "An Investiga-

tion of the Beta and Gamma Radia-
tions Emitted in the Decays of Sever-
al Short-lived Neutron-Induced Radio-
activities", Thurs. Oct. 4, 145 Randall
Laboratory, at 3:00 p.m. Chairman J. M.
Cork.
Doctoral Examination for William
Robley Ebert, Pharmaceutical Chemis-
try; thesis: "A Study of the Assay and
Stability of Tablet Formulations Con-
taining Aspirin, Phanacetin and Sym-
pathomimetic Amines", Fri., Oct. 5,
2525 Chemistry Bldg., at 2:00 p.m.
Chairman, L. F. Worrell.
Coming Events
Phi Sigma October meeting in the
Rackham Amphitheater at 8':00 p.m.
on Thurs., Oct. 5. The first in a series
on The American Tropics. Dr. Laurence
C. Stuart of the Museum of Zoology
will speak on the "General Geography
of Tropical America." A business meet-
ing is scheduled for 7:30. Refrshments
served; the public is invited.
Placement Notices
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS:
A representative from the following
will be at the Engineering School:
Wed., Oct. 10.
Container Corp. of America, Chicago,
Ill. - B. S. in Ch. E., Elet., Id.CInstru.,
Mat'ls, Mech., and Eng. Mech. for Pro-
duction.
For appointments contact the En-
gineering Placement Office, 347 W. E.,
ext. 2182.
A representative from the following
will be at the Bureau of Appointments:
Thurs., Oct. 11.
U. S. Department of State - Men and
women in any field, including Econ.,
Admin., or Aectg., History, Pl, Sci.,
Languages, and Internat'l Rel., for op-
portunities as officers in the Foreign
Service. In addition to the group inter-
views during the day, there will be a
general meeting at 4:00 p.m., Oct. 11,
in Angell Hall Ad. C, open to all in-
terested students. The interviews and
meeting precedes th'e semi-annual For-
eign Service Officer Exam to be given
on December 8, 1956. The examination
is open to all qualified men and wo-
men who are American citizens of at
least 9 years standing. Although a can-
didate's spouse need not be a citizen on
the date of the exam, citizenship.must
have been obtained prior to the date
of the officer's appointment, Applica-
tion forms may be obtained at the
Bureau of Appointments. The closing
date for filing the application iscOcto-
ber 26, 1956.
For appointments contct the Bueau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin., Bldg.,
ext. 371.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Dept. of theNavy, Bureau of Ord-
nance, offers employment opportuni-
ties to Engineers, Clerks, Stenographers,
Mathematicians, Physicists, Account-
ants, Auditors and Statisticians. Posi-
tions are throughout the United States,
including N. J., Va., Md., Ind., Ill., Neb.,
Calif., R. I., Ga., Wash. D.C., and the
Canal Zone.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 371.
Registration With The Bureau Notice:
Meetings will be held Tuesday, Octo-
ber 9, at 3 o'clock and at 4 o'clock, in
Auditorium A of Angell Hall, for stu-
dents interested in registering in either
the Teacher Placement BoruGeneral
Placement Division of the Bureau of
Appointments. Each meeting is open to
all students, who may come at the
time most convenient for them.
The General Division includes posi-
tions in the Physical and Health Sci-
ences, Business and Industry, Social
Work, etc. and the Education Division
includes all levels of Elementary, High
School, and College teaching and ad-
ministrative positions.
Since employment interviews begin
on Monday, Oct. 15, it is urged that
students take blanks at this time and
return them as soon as possible so
that we will have records to give to
the interviewers.
Men who are facing military service
after graduation are also urged to regis-
ter and are encouraged to talk to inter-
viewers with an eye to employment aft-
er their release from active duty.
Lane Hall's Friday afternoon coffee hour
at 4:15 wil lhonor Miss Deloris Elden,
new Assistant Program Director of Re-
ligious Affairs. All staff members and
students are welcome.

A unique experiment in news-
paper work for University journal-
ism students was termed "success-
ful" by its participants in a report
delivered to the annual meeting of
the University Press Club of Mich-
igan here Saturday.
In the experiement, a University
professor and seven journalism
students took over complete edi-
toral and business operation of
two Michigan weeklies. The Evart
Review and The Marion Press for
12 weeks this summer.
Fred S. Smith, editor of the Re-
view and Press Club president, told
150 editors, publishers and news-
men attending the meeting that
he felt the paper had "perked up"
a great deal in the hands of the
University team.
Favorable Reactions
"Reaction of townspeople was
favorable-in fact, they would like
to see the project repeated next
year," he added.
Arthur Lane, a graduate stu-
dent who participated in the pro-
ject, said, "We found in a small
community, such as Evart, you
talk business with the people only
after a half-hour or friendly con-
versation. The important thing
is getting to know the community
and what makes it tick."
Prof. Karl Zeisler, of the Jour-
nalism department and "visiting
publisher" in the experiment, em-
phasized that students were
thrown into the job under realistic
conditions.
"We arrived in Evart on a Mon-
day and had to get out the first
paper on Wednesday," he said.
First Step
Summing up, Professor Wesley
Maurer, chairman of the Univer-
sity's journalism department stat-
ed, "It was the first step toward
advancing an instruction program
designed to serve the weekly news-
papers of the state and nation. The
project also made possible the inte-
gration of subject matter with the
techniques of journalism."
Since the initial announcement
of the project, he noted, several
aditional newspapers have express-
ed an interest in setting up similar
arrangements in the future.
The Press Club also heard a re-
port attacking national magazine
"exposes" of college athletics as a
"betrayal of the high standards of
American journalism."
Prof. Marcus L. Plant, faculty
SOrganization
Notices
Use of this column is restricted to
OFFICIALLY REGISTERED student or-
ganizations.. Registration forms are
available in the Office of Student Af-
fairs, 1020 Administration Building.
Registration for the current semester
should be completed not later than
October 12.
Field Hockey Club, mass meeting,
5:10 p.m., WAB.
* . *
International Center, social hour,
4:30-6p.m, International Center.
* * *
Lutheran Student Association, Vesper
Service, 9:30 p.m. Lutheran Student
Chapel.
* * *
Old Members SGC Administrative
Wing, meeting 4 p.m. Room 3, Union.
* * *
Modern Dance Club, meeting 7:30 p.m.
Barbour Gym Dance Studio.
* * *
Christian Science Organization, 7:30
p.m. Upper Room, Lane Hall.
* * *
Westminster Student Fellowship, Bible
Study, 4:15 p.m., League.
* * *
Students for Stevnson, 2:10 p.m. Un-
ion Ballroom, Speaker, Senator Paul H.
Douglas.
* * *

representative to the Big Ten Con-
ference said many magazine at-
tempts to portray the "inside
story" of college football were
based on "inadequate investigation
and even no investigation at all."
.Prof.Plant called on the national
magazines to stop making college
athletics their "whipping boy."
In Press Club elections held Sat-
urday, George V. Mather of the
Albion Evening Recorder advanced
from first Vice-president to presi-
dent, replacing Smith.
Ken West, managing editor of
the Lansing State Journal, ad-

vanced to first vice-president, and
Meredith Clark, editor and pub-
lisher of the Vicksburg Commer-
cial, was chosen second vice-presi-
dent.
Cleland Wyllie, managing editor
of The University of Michigan
News Service, was re-elected sec-
retary-treasurer.
Professor Maurer was re-elected
as secretary of the Club's foreign
journalism fellowships.
The Press Club is a voluntary
association open to editors, pub-
lishers, and newsmen in Michigan.

For MEN Only
byq elV'9e wild Ji'
SLACKS AREN'T SLACK THIS YEAR .. .
The bag and sag has disappeared from trousers, and well
dressed Michigan Men are sporting streamlined, straight
line trousers built for ease and comfort, but with a new
neat look.
Trousers that are in style feature a flat front with no
pleats, and are tailored with slim straight legs for better
appearance. The adjustable back strap that has been
giving custom trousers their. "perfect fit" look for sev-
eral years is now appearing on our stock dress trousers,
too.
WILD'S HAS THE LATEST FOR YOU ...
As always, Wild's has a tremendous selection of trousers
in up-to-the-minute style. You can choose now from
every fabric, color and shade, and there are full stocks
in sizes from 28" to 44". Prices range from $15.95 to
$22.50 for flannels, coverts and whipcords.
Talking about colors-if you'd like something just a little
bit different, ask to see "Currency Green" (it's as inter-
esting as money!) This is a brand new color, exclusive at
Wild's. It is the kind of color-that works into all kinds of
good combinations . . . goes equally well with browns or
grays, and will be one of the hardest working items in
your wardrobe.
PLEATLESS TROUSERS ARE GREAT
FOR HEAVYWEIGHTS .,.
Anyone who has been trying to camouflage a broad mid-
section with "maternity pleat" trousers should try on a
pair of the new flat styled type. Old-fashioned trousers
tended to "give" when sitting down by means of blossom-
ing pleats-obviously making the midsection bulkier and
larger. The new style trousers maintain their flat front
at all times, and "give" horizontally by means of a longer
rise. Thin or heavy, you'll have fewer wrinkles and look
neater in the new style.
FAMOUS ENGLISH DAKS
NOW IN SLIM STYLE -*
To complete the trouser department, we have just re-
ceived a shipment of "Daks" luxury slacks with new slim
tailoring. These are for you who want the very finest
available. "Daks" are made of fine English Worsted flan-
nel. They have the famous elastic self-supporting adjust-
able belt tabs, and clever sponge rubber grippers that
keep your shirt smoothly in place at all times.
IF YOU WANT IT, WILD'S WILL GET IT
At Wild's, we try to carry a complete stock of every cloth-
ing item. But, if we cannot fill your desires exactly, it is
our policy to immediately place a special, rush order at
no extra charge. You can always count on our complete
effort to satisfy your clothing needs.
-U

1

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Subscribe to The Michigan Daily
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1956-57 LECTURE COURSE
Includes In Its Outstanding Series
TWO GREAT INTERNATIONAL FIGURES
Clement Attlee
'(Earl Attlee)
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FIFTH NUMBER - JAN. 7
Dr. Ralph J. Bunche
Under Secretary of the United Nations
SEVENTH NUMBER - FEB. 25

i-14 America's first operational supersonic fighter

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