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October 04, 1956 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-04

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*1

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCT OBER 4, 1956

LCA, ATO, Dt

Gain

Victories in - Footbail Tilts

Weekly 'Grid Picks' End Tomorrow;
Winners To Get Free Movie Tickets

Lone Goal

'iChi Psi T humps DKE;
j SAM Wins Close Contest

The " Grid Picks competition is'
going to be a lot harder this year. brought in person to the main.
Last week 11 out of 132 entrants desk on the second floor of the
picked perfect slates. In compari- Daily.
son, only one entry managed to Be sure toForgecas the score of
pick a perfect slate for the entire Michrgonogast thsorelo
1955 football season. The Auburn- the Michigan game for this will
Tennessee game seemed to give be the decding factor in case of
participants the most trouble last ties.
week. The winner will receive two free
Al entries for this week's con- tickets to either "War and Peace"
£est must be received by the Grid which will be playing at the Michi-
Picks editor before noon of Fri- gan theater or "Attack" which will
day, Oct' 5. Selections should be be showing at the State.
mailed to Grid Picks, Michigan THIS WEEK'S GAMES
Daily, 420 Maynard Street or 1. Michigan St. at MICHIGAN

2. Alabama vs. Vanderbilt
3. Arkansas at Texas Christian

4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Baylor at Maryland
Brown at Yale
Illinois at Washington
Indiana at Notre Dame
Iowa St. at Nebraska
Oregon St. at Iowa
Penn St. at Army
Pittsburgh at California
Purdue at Minnesota
So. California at Wisconsin
SMU at Missouri
Stanford at Ohio State
Tennessee at Duke
Texas Tech at Texas A&M
Tulane at Northwestern
Wake Forest at Virginia
West Virginia at Texas

By PAUL BORMAN
Spectacular playing by Fran
LeMire sparked Lambda Chi Al-
pha to an opening victory in the
contest which highlighted yester-
day's I-M football action at South
Ferry Field.
The LCA's, last year's I-M grid
champs, led by LeMire's pinpoint
passing and dazzling running,
swamped Alpha Sigma Phi, 32-0.
End Dick Good caught two LeMire
touchdown aerials to lead his team
in scoring with twelve points.
No Blockers
In playing tailback, LeMire
stood 10-15 yards behind the line
of scrimmage with no blockers.
The other two backfield men went

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&#!!

MEEtiMIEN

Correction
Phi Kappa Tau beat Sigma
Alpha Epsilon in fraternity
touch' football, 1-0, Tuesday,
and not as reported in yester-
day's Daily which had SA
winning 1-0.

BILL MACFARLAND, former
Captain and All-American Center
on the University of Michigan
Hockey team, scored the lone goal
for the Edmonton Flyers as they
were swamped by the Detroit Red
Wings, 6-1 in an exhibition game
last night.
A capacity crowd of 7,800
watched the Red Wings take a 4-1
lead in the second period and add
two more goals in the final period
as they overpowered their hapless
Western .Hockey . League . farm
team. -

JAN PELT PASSES WELL:
Michigan Practices Offensive Drills

HALFBACK TERRY BARR, who missed Tuesday's practice while
being treated for a case of hemorrhoids, was back in action
yesterday and running at full strength.

Here's quality...

I

Michigan polished up its offen-
sive and defensive yesterday as its
big game with Michigan State this
Saturday loomes closer.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan divid-
ed the drills almost equally, stres-
sing defense for the first half of
the practice session and winding
up with a spirited offensive work-
out. While Line Coach Jack Blott

drilled his charges on defensive
play in the forward wall, Coach
Don Robinson was working on pass
defense.
Reserves Run MSU Plays
Oosterbaan then brought the
two groups together and the re-
serves ran Michigan State plays
against the varsity.

Men's

International Center Launches
New Soccer League Sunday
y CARL RISEMAN I

Noticably improved from last
weekend was the pass defense.
Whereas the UCLA pass patterns
gave Michigan backs fits last Sat-
urday, the reserves interpretation
of Spartan plays seemed to fool no
one, with halfbacks Bob Ptacek
and Terry Barr intercepting sev-
eral passes.
Barr, who missed Tuesday's drills
while undergoing treatment for a
case of hemorrhoids, got back in
action and showed up well, both
on offense and defense.
Shift to Offense
Shifting to offnse, the varsity
hustled through a variation of pass
and running plays. If yesterday's
drills are any indication, the Wol-
verines' passing attack, used spar-
ingly against UCLA, may prove to
be perplexing to many opposing
elevents this fall.'
Jim Van Pelt unlimbered his
arm in the passing drills and the
way he was hitting his targets
seemed to indicate he has shaken
the bothersome hand injury that
has plagued him of late. Jim Pace
also passed well.

out as pass receivers, leaving Le-
Mire alone to either pass or run
with the ball, two tasks which he
did extremely well.
Alpha Tau Omega had an easy
time with Sigma Nu as they
crushed them 24-0. Big gun of the
ATO attack was halfback Tom
Boyle who scored half of the
points on two touchdowns.
Tailback Jim Sergeson passed
for four touchdowns to lead Delta
Upsilon to a smashing 27-0 shut-
out over Zeta Psi. Center Stew
Evans served as 'Sergeson's target
for two TD aerials, while ends Bob
i Mansfield and Jim Meyers each
took in one.
Easy Time
Chi Psi, led by quarterback Tim
Putney, had an easy time as they
ran over Delta Kappa Epsilon,
20-2. Putney scored one touch-
down and passed to centers Bob
Nissly and Tom Martinek for the
others.
An extra point scored on a pass
from tailback Joel Tauber to end
Hal Berritt gave Sigma Alpha Mu
a 19-18 victory over Triangle.
Tauber also scored one of the
Sammy touchdowns and passed
for the other two to end Larry
Levy and Center George Finkel.
In a tussle between two profes.
signal fraternities, Alpha Omega
scored eight points in a close first
half and coasted to a 20-0 win
over Alpha Rho Chi.
Protested Game
In the other pro contest, Psi
Omega edged Delta Sigma Delta in
a "protested" game. End Joe
Schneider caught the Delt's TD
aerial while end Bill Rahn caught
the all-important toss for the ex-
tra point.
In other social fraternity games;
Acacia edged Theta Delta Chi 1-0,
Phi Kappa Psi took Sigma Phi,
20-0, Phi Upsilon beat Tau Kappa
Epsilon 13-0, Phi Delta Theta won
over Phi Epsilon Pi 20-0, and Delta
Chi and Zeta Beta Tau were post-
poned.

I

I

The International Center is
launching. an ambitious sports
program this year.
For the first time in the Center's
history, its intramural sports pro-
gram will be on an organized basis.
A sports committee having a rep-
resentative from almost every
country in the world will head this
program. The committee will be
under the dynamic leadership of
Thomas David who hails from
Bombay, India.
Soccer First Sport
The first major sport will teo
soccer which begins on Sunday,
Oct. 7. With over 100 entries thus:
far, Mr. David is hoping to have
two, four team leagues. Some of
the teams will be representing
countries as in the case of Burma,
Thailand, China and Turkey.
Other teams will be composed of
several countries as in the South-
COLLEGIATE
HAIRSTYLES
to Please You U
They're suave;
Individualistic;
Smart--
* 11 HAIRCUTTERS
9 NO WAITING
The Dascola Barbers

east Asia team which will include
players from Indonesia, Pakistan,
India and the Philippines, An-
other combination of several coun-
tries will play on the South Ameri-
canl team which will include play-
ers from all the Latin American
countries and Mexico.
The soccer games will be played
on Wines field with games starting{
at 1:30 and 3:30-p.m. each Sunday.
Each team will play a minimum
of four games and the winner in
each league will meet on the final
Sunday to decide the champion-
ship.
The league has been in existence
informally since 1930. In the past
the Chinese and the Turks have
been the teams to beat. China
has won the championship seven'
times while the Turks have taken
the championship 10 times includ-
ing the last three years in a row.
At the end of the season the
champion will receive a beautiful
trophy, which the International
Center received as a gift from Niel
Kanti, an Indian princess.
It is interesting to note that
soccer is the number one sport inj
the world today, played by more
people than any other game.
A new game has been devised to
give soccer .players a chance to
play all year round. It's called
Codeball, played on a handball
court and as Earl Riskey, director
of I-M sports has noted, has been
gaining popularity among many
students here at the University.

Sport Shorts

BROOKLYN (M)-Bucky Harris,
who resigned as manager of the
Detroit Tigers, has been signed as
special assistant to Joe Cronin,
general manager of the Boston
Red Sox, Cronin announced yes-
terday. Harris will work out of the
Boston office on special assign-
ments.
No Broadcast
MILWAUKEE ()-As if they
hadn't already suffered enough,
Milwaukee baseball fans couldn't;
get the World Series on the radio!
yesterday. No local station carried
the broadcast.

yesterday cancelled the former
scheduled comeback bout tonight
and announced Olson will never
fight again.
"I've known Olson hasn't been
right since he's been here. After
his disappointing workout Tues-
day, I was convinced he should iot
try a comeback," Manager Sid
Flaherty of San Francisco said,
Landy Will Be Ready
MELBOURNE (U.P.)-John
Landy, holder of the world mile
record, won a two-mile race yes-
terday in nine minutes, 2.2 seconds

and then said he was confident he
* * * would be ready to compete in the
Olson Quits Ring 5,000-meter run during Australia's
P O R T L A N D, Ore. (A)-The Olympic track and field trials
manager of Carl (Bobo) Olson { Oct. 13.

IL

Near Michigan Theatre

III

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7' r r1 rrT.
OU'RE SMART
TO MEET THE WEATHER
IN OUR WARM

Sularlan

Cfo.ti

.4,to $40
COMFORT ... FREEDOM .. . COLOR
. . . These are the three good reasons why
our Suburban Coats are so popular with the
well dressed men. They are just long enough
fordriving, and warm enough for watching
football games. They come in a multitude of
handsome tweeds and fleeces.
See them, today!

I

I

Im

Si

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