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September 17, 1956 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27',1956

"M MCHIGAN DAILV

PAGE T R

MONDAY, SEPTEMI3ER 17,1956 KITE MICIITGAi~J DAILY PAGE THRE1~

w

Marching Band Known As One Of Nation's.

Best

> University bands had their orig-
in in 1844 when nine student mu-
sicians assembled to play at cam-
pus chapel services.
Thus the nucleus of the Univer-
sity Bands which today comprises
over 250 students was formed.
The Marching Band, Symphony
Band and Wolverine Band form
the three units of the Band which
is under the direction of Prof. Wil-
liam D. Revelli. Men and women
from all colleges in the University
may apply for membership in all
the bands with the exception of
the Marching Band, which is all-
male.
Prof. Revelli and his assistants
determine the membership of the
Bands by means of auditions.
Probably the best known of the
Bands, the Marching Band has
been the subject of a special short
feature, "Here Comes the Band"
produced by RKO pictures, and
has also had a feature article in
"Life" magazine.
Playing for fall football games
and pep rallies constitute the main
activity of the Marching Band. It
also accompanies the football team
on at least two out-of-town trips
This year trips are scheduled to
Iowa and Ohio State.
Possessing one of the largest'
band libraries in the nation, the
University Symphony Band gives
numerous concerts during the
year and each spring goes on tour'
to all parts of the nation. It has
a membership of approximately
110 pieces.
In the past such distinguished
guest conductors as Percy Grain-
ger, Morton Gould, Edwin Franko

Want to Usher?
Students who would like to
usher for Choral Union con-
certs may apply to Harold
Warner, head usher, at Hill
Box office.
Applications will be taken at
the box office from Sept. 17 to
21 from 5 to 6 p.m.
The Choral Union begins its
78th year this fall. Featured
will be the Boston Philharmon-
ic, Artur Rubinstein and the
Boston "Pops."

SP

CIAL

11

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T

OK

BABY BUGGY BOOGIES-As "wheels" revolve, "baby buggy"
marches down the field as Part of show's plot. Band performs for
all home games and at least one away game each year.
SCHOLARSHIPS:
Students Who Need Help
MayGet Awards, 'Grants

i

SPIDER NEARS THE WEB-The Marching Band is known for
its use of. props and moving formations. Here a "spider" enters a
web of neatly uniformed and precision placed bandsmen.

SERI

CE

University students who find
themselves financially strait, have
great opportunity to receive aid
through scholarships, awards and
prizes.
More than 600 scholarships are
available to undergraduate stu-
dents.
Relatively few cash awards are
available to the entering fresh-
man. Chief, among these are the
Regents - Alumni Scholarships
which are given annually to out-
standing graduates of accredited
high schools within the state.

Goldman and Ferde Grofe have
conducted the Band.
Concerts in Ann Arbor are given
primarily in Hill Auditorium. How-
ever during the spring months out-
of-door concerts are given on the
Diagonal by the University Sym-
phony Band.
Playing for basketball games; an
occasional hockey game, local par-
ades and other activities are the

main activities of the Wolverine
Band. This Band is recommended
for those without enough profic-
iency to qualify for the Symphony
or Marching Band and for those
who do not have the time to devote
to the extensive rehearsals re-
quired by the other bands.
Instruments for all Bands are
provided free of charge by the
University.

for

Hopwoods
Encourage
'U' Writers
The new and unusual in writing
has been annually encouraged to
niany of the University's aspiring
writers in the Avery and Jule Hop-
wood contests.
This creative writing contest
with its spbstantial monetary
awards, has awarded as much as
$1,500 for a single work.
Since, 1932, the Hopwood contest
has. been open to freshmen al-
though the original awards were
for upperclassmen only. Freshmen
Sawards are made near the end of
the fall semester when prizes of
$50, $30, and $20 are given winners
for outstanding works in essay,
(fiction, and poetry.
Seniors and graduate students
may compete in the major divis-
ions of essay, drama, fiction, and
poetry while undergraduates in
any class may compete for the
minor awards in these divisions.
Manuscripts for these awards are
submitted during the spring se-
mester.
Winners are announced near the
close of the school year at which
time noted speakers are brought
to campus to talk at the presenta-
tion.
Originated by the will of the
late Avery Hopwood, '05 million-
aire playwright, the directors of
the contest were instructed that
"students competing for the prizes
shall not be confined to academic
subjects but shall be allowed the
wildest possible latitude."
Hopwood willed more than
$500,000 for prizes in the annual
Hopwood contest which began for
upperclassmen in 1931.
Betty Smith, author of "A Tree
Grows in Brooklyn" and Arthur
Miller, '38, who has won the New
York Critics drama award twice
and received the Pulitizer prize in
1949 for "Death of a Salesman"
are some of the well-known mod-
ern writers who got their start via
Hopwood awards.

These scholarships pay for semes-
ter fees with a provision for re-
newal for a maximum of eight
semesters if the student's schol-
astic performance warrants it.
In addition, many freshmen are
given scholarships by University
alumni and alumnae groups
throughout the country.
Most University scholarships,
however, require that applicants
have at least one semester's resi-
dence on campus. They may be
classified into two categories -
general scholarships available to
all students regardless of imma-
triculation, and those given by
particular schools and colleges of
the University to their own stu-
dents.
Outstanding Service Rewarded
A number of scholarships are
presented for outstanding service
in campus activities. More than
200 University Band Merit Awards,
ranging in value from $50 to $150,
are made annually to members of
the Marching or Concert Bands
who show both scholastic ability
and good musicianship.
Every year a member of The
Michigan Daily editorial staff who
has shown constructive contribu-
tion to the University community
through work on the newspaper,
is given the Wendy Owen Memo-
rial Award of approximately $185.
Selection for scholarship aid is
based in nearly every case on
scholastic ability, character and
financial need, although addition-
al criteria may be designated for
particular awards.
Allocation of many of the schol-
arships is under the control of the
Committee on University Scholar-
ships which includes the Dean of
Men, Dean of Women and three
faculty members appointed by the
Board of Regents on recommenda-
tion by the President.

i

ALMOST 400 VOICES:
'U' Provides Choral Opportunities

II Reserve Books This. EASY Way-

11

AVOID the usua

I

RUSH crowds and

I

waiting lines. Fill in this schedule card,
drop in mail, then forget about next se-
mester's books until you pick them up
during the orientation period, If later,
you find you will be unable to attend
school the first semester, please cancel
this reservation promptly.
WE GUARANTEE-We will select
GOOD USED or NEW required
books, as you specify, sack 'em,
and have ready for you to pick up
at your convenience,.

PRE-REGISTERED STUDENTS

11

VOICES FILL THE AUDITORIUM-In formal attire, Michigan Singers, elite among University
singing groups, fills Hill Auditorium with music.

i

Conference
Stimulates
Discussion

Opportunities for choral singing
at Michigan are offered to any in-
terested student.
The Choral program is under the
direction of Prof. Maynard Klein,
conductor of University Choirs
and Director of Choirs at the Na-
tional Music Camp, Interlochen,
Michigan.
Prof. Klein has six campus sing-
ing groups under his direction
which are constituted of almot
400 participating voices. Lareest
of these ensembles is the Univer-
sity Choir, 250 mixed voices.
In the past they have given per-
formances of Bach's St. Matthew
Passion, Mozart's Requiem and
Stravinsky's Symponie de Psaum-
eis.
Last spring the Choir sang Mo-

zart's Missa Brevis, the first time
the work had been performed on
campus.
The most advanced and select
Choir is the Michigan Singers, a
fifty-voice group which is selected
from among the best singers on
campus. Motets, madrigals, con-
temporary works and technical
works for small ensembles make
up the repetory of the group.
The Tudor Singers is a Choir of
16 voices who sing music of all
periods. They are the usual per-
forming group for the Collegium
Musicum, an organization noted
for the research and performance
of old music, particularly Renais-
sance, which has just been redis-
covered and re-edited.
The Bach Choir has 80 mixed

voices and also sings music from
all periods. There is a Women's
Choir of 30 voices which performs
such works as Debussy's Blessed
Damozel and Pergolesi's Stabat
Mater. In addition to the Women's
Choir, there is the Women's Glee
Club which consists of 40 voices.
The Women's Glee Club each year
goes on a tour.
The Arts Chorale is a mixed
group affording any student the
onportunity of singing a varied
repertory of good choral music and
the experience of concert perfor-
mances. For those inexperienced in
choral singing, or who might not
sVV 'sito3 J aggo auk giol JTenb
Chorale provides an excellent op-
portunity, according to Prof.
Klein.

-GUARANTEED-
THE RIGHT BOOK
FOR THE RIGHT COURSE!

A chance for students to discuss
problems in the Literary College
with the faculty is provided by a
series of special conferences.
The conferences, about three
every year, usually feature a three-
or four-man p a n e l composed
mostly of faculty members which
talk over a particular problem with
the audience.
The conferences are arranged by
the Literary College Conference
Steering Committee.
One of the most heated of last
year's, conferences was a discus-
sion of whether the Literary Col-
lege was stimulating "intellectual
curiosity."

a

I

W hen You're Looking for a
Better Laundry in Ann Arbor ..
Try our ONE-STOP Laundry
and Dry-Cleaning Service.0.

[ BOOK RESERVATION CARD
SEPTEMBER 1956 SEMESTER
FILL IN THIS CARD and reserve your books for'I
[ DepCourse 1 st semester. We GUARANTEE to have the right
DeptNo books ready for you, as you indicate.
_____SAME SERVICE to Cash or Charge Customers [
I Name__
Home
Address City
______ I prefer Q GOOD USED - NEW BOOKS
I Iwill be a Q cash, or Q charge customer.
Your order will be ready by September 15, 1956 1
Signed__
Local Address City-.....
[ _ _ _(if Available) [

STUDENTS

'/elome to in

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dry in an hour at our store.

RAMSAY PRINTERS, Inc.
well equipped to take care of your
PRINTING REQUIREMENTS

* DRYERS Available to
Dry Clothes Competely
* SHIRTS Quick-Serviced
24-hour service on
request
" DRY CLEANING -
One-Day Service
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to-

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