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September 26, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY,

SEPTEMBER 7$, 1958

ill Expansion

To Add

B' Team

Touch

Football

i

Exposed Indiana Gridders
Receive Salk Polio Vaccine

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (Y)-Salk
polio shots were part of yesterday's
practice session for the Indiana'
University varsity football team,
while reserve guard Mert Hoag-
land was reportea improving at
the I.U. Medical Center in Indi-
anapolis.'
Inoculations for All
The athletic department decided
on precautionary shots for the 64
players although the vaccine is
not expected to give any protec-
tion against previous exposure to
polio.
Hoagland, former Fremont, Ohio,
athlete .whose parents now live in
Chattanooga, Tenn., had a lower
temperature and no paralysis. The
center, which has listed his case
only as "possible polio," expected
to complete the diagnosis today or
tomorrow.
Second Case Discovered
The general immunization pro-

gram was recommended after an-
other student, Richard W. Card-
well of Kokomo, was found to have
polio.
Dr. E. Bryan Quarles, director
of the student health service, said
free shots would be available to
students under 20 years old. A
nominal charge was to be made
to older students.
The football players got their
vaccinations free as part of the
athletic department's medical care
program.
Indiana will open its football
season at home Saturday against
Iowa.
Postponement Unlikely
At Chicago, Commissioner K. L.
Wilson of the Big Ten said he is
"pretty sure the game will be,
played as scheduled."
In case it should be. postponed,
which Indiana has not suggested,
Wilson added that the Big Ten
office and authorities of Indiana
and Iowa would decide whether it
should be cancelled or played later.
"The only time it could be
played would be after the regular
season ends," the commissioner
said. "Big Ten faculty action
would be needed to approve ex-
tending the season."

-Day-Dick Gaskiil
TROUBLE FOR UCLANS?-Michigan's junior halfback, Jim Pace,
is sharpening up his passing arm for this Saturday's game with the
Bruins. Pace, along with sophomore Bob Ptacek, will operate from
the lefthalf or tailback slot. Although he*is primarily known for
running, his passing arm could also prove to be a strong weapon
for the Wolverines.
Reserv es Dern4trate
UCLA Patterns in Drills

ImM SPOBTLIGHT
... by Jim Baud
By JIM BAAD
EARL RISKEY'S department of Intramural Athletics has come up
with a number of "new looks" as it heads into the 1956 fall
program.
The biggest of changes will be the innovation of "B"-team touch
football. This year the I-M department has made the necessary ar-
rangements so that the residence halls and the social fraternity league
can field both "A" and "B" teams on the gridiron-just as the "A-B"
plan is worked in basketball.
The idea of "A-B" football is not new, its just that Riskey has
finally acquired enough facilities to put the plan into operation. The
major drawback in the past has been lack of space, but with Ann
Arbor High School's abandonment of Wine's Field, more teams can
now be taken care of.
The Michigan Band uses Wine's Field in the afternoon, but as
the playing area comes equipped with lights, Riskey is planning a
full slate of night football games.
"Probably the A teams will play at night at Wine's and the B teams
will be playing in the afternoon at South Ferry Field," said Riskey.
"Nothing is really definite yet, however."
The advantage of the two sets of teams are mainly twofold. First
of all it carries out the I-M department's aim to get as many men par-
ticipating as possible and secondly it is a source of additional points
in the annual race to number one slots in the various leagues. Smaller
groups may suffer some pointwise from the. rule however, as it will,
be difficult for them to field two teams. The rule stands as in basket-
ball that if an organization can enter only one team,. that team must
play in the "A" league.
North Campus Program .
HE NEXT new thing coming from the Riskey office is an, outline
for a North Campus campus intramural program. -An interesting
note--the appointed director of this program is Harry Stuhldreher,
whose father won some fame a few years back as the quarterback
portion of Notre Dame's immortal Four Horsemen. Stuhldreher him.
self played football and hockey for Michigan.
Under his direction and with the cooperation of the students living
on North Campus a year-around sports program is being laid out.
The plan is to divide the apartments into ulits of about one hundred
families. Each unit will then be responsible for assembling a team and
appointing an athletic chairman or manager. The same system of
points now used on campus will be adopted there and a yearly champ-
ion will emerge according to total points.
A Reminder...
SO MUCH for the new look and back to the old. Riskey reminds all
managers and/or athletic chairmen who are planning on entering
a football team to be at the I-M Building tonight at 7:30. The meeting
is especially important as this is the time when scheduling will be
done. The managers of the other fall sports-track, crosscountry and.
volleyball-are urged to come also.
The I-M Department is also sending out a plea for touch foot-
ball officials. The job is a paying one and there are plenty of openings.
Apply at the office in the I-M building if interested.
Coming back to Wine's field, once the scene of many a high
school football game, will this fall 4feature many an international
soccer match. The International Student's soccer league has been set
up again this year. Riskey figures he has about eight teams registered
so far and he is planning to schedule their games under the Wines
Field lights. The teams are usually grouped on a national basis and
the battles are country against country, which makes for interesting
watching. Last year the Turks came out on top.

a

x

I

More intense body-contact work
featured Varsity football practice
yesterday afternoon at Ferry Field.
The entire session was devoted
to drills against the type of oppo-
sition UCLA is expected to present
Announcements
There will be a meeting of all
men interested in become Intra-
mural football officials at the I-M
Building at 4 p.m. today and to-
morrow.
r-Shel Chambers
Field Supervisor-
* * *
Men interested in playing soccer,
please contact Tali Cepuritis at
NO 3-3907.
--T. Cepuritis, Mgr.
s ,"
There' will be- an important,'M'
Club meeting tonight at 7:30. All
those who wish to sell sun visors
at football games should attend.
--Tom Maentz, Pres.
Subscribe to
The Michigan
Daily.
Especially for you-
DESIGNED
H A IR STY LES

Saturday, with the reserves "im-
personating" the Bruins.
First off, the regulars =practiced
defending against the Californ-
ians' running plays, followed by,
a session of protecting against the
anticipated pass patterns of the
enemy.
Full-scale scrimmages then en-
sued, pitting the "Uclans" against
the first and second strings, first
offensively then defensively.
Jim Pace, John Herrnstein and
Jim Byers all ran well, as did Dave
Bowers, operating on the end-
around. Pace, Jim Van Pelt and
Jim Maddock passed effectively.
Snider Returns
Center Gene Snider was back in
the thick of things, having com-
pletely recovered from the knee
injury received a week ago last
Saturday. Another injured line-
man, Mary Nyren, was still taking
it easy on his recovering sprained
ankle, however.
During the scrimmage, a small
dog added a light touch to the
otherwise serious business by im-
planting himself between the
opposing lines just as the quarter-
back was calling signals.

I
,F

4

SOONERS TOP GRID POLL:
Upsets Drop Notre Dame Maryland

x

DRAMATIC ATTRACTIONS
WORLD AFFAIRS
Season Tickets - Main Floor, $8.50, First Balcony, $7.50
SPECIAL STUDENT RATE - $3.50

-4

They score in sports ...
They rate on a date ...

"y The Associated Press
Before they have even played a
game, Oklahoma's Sooners have
lost two of their leading challen-
gers for the No. 1 spot in college
football.
Picked as the top college team
in the Associated Press pre-season
poll of sports writers and broad-
casters, Oklahoma didn't play last
Saturday. But two other top-10
teams, Notre Dame and Mary-
land, did.
Maryland Unrated '
The first weekly poll after the
season's play began again listed

Complete Course, Second Balcony, Unreserved
Box Office Now Open
HILL AUDITORIUM

Oklahoma on top, but Notre Dame
had dropped to 14th after a 19-13
setback by Southern Methodist
and Maryland was clear out ofa
sight after a 26-12 beating by
Syracuse.
It took just one week to give the
pre-season selections a thorough
shuffling.
Oklahoma received first-place
votes from 91 of the 150 writers
and broadcasters participating in
the first weekly poll and enough
high placings from the other to
give the Sooners 1,150 points on

the basis of 10 for first place, 9 for
second, etc.
The rest of the first 10 lined U1
this way: Georgia Tech, Michigan
State, Texas Christian, Southern
Methodist, "Southern California,
Syracuse, Ohio State, Mississippi
and Pittsburgh.
Neither SMU nor Syracuse had
been listed in the first 20 in the
pre-season picks. Southern Calif-
ornia and Mississippi had been in
the second 10. All will be in action.
this week.
The top teams with t place
votes in parentheses and won-lost

I'

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