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September 23, 1956 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I I

PAGE JIGHT

TAE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1954

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25. 195w

'BIGGER THAN EVER'
Technic Celebrates Its 75th

DORM BROADCASTS:
WCBN Resumes Program Service

Year

C7

I,

By TED FRIEDMAN

Sheldon Levin, Editor-in-Chief
of the Michigan Technic, ,indi-
cates that this, the magazine's
75th year, may be its most suc-
essful in history.
The engineering magazine is
jumping from 64 pages, as at the
beginning of last year, to 100 pages
for the coming October issue.
"This issue is really going to
coke up the coals," the editor
said. "It's going to be bigger than
ever. We've got more advertising
than ever."
The Technic, which is the only
"slick" (glossy paper) student
publication at the University,
completely sold out on four of its
eight issues last year.
The magazine features techni-
cal articles, engineering - school
news, jokes and occasional science
fiction. Last year it even included
poetry.
The poem, "Tears and Beer and
A Few Cheers," was a college
life ballad as first told by "a
liberal arts man," then by a busi-
ness. administration major and
finally by an engineer. It con-
cludes with, "'Stop; say no more,
we beg of you; Your life is the
roughest, they sighed."

EDITOR LEVIN-Your life is the roughest.

of thevirtually doubled size, the1
Technic is in severe need of try-
outs. The engineering senior said,
"We're going to have tryouts
Monday night at 7:00 p.m. in the
East Engineering Building."
Its 75 years makes the T Ichnic
the oldest student engineering
magazine in existence. The office
walls are cluttered with awards.
Two hundred dollars was won
by Lee Allgood, '56E, for a weld-
ing article written last year. An-
other $200 was awarded to the
magazine for publishing the arti-
cle.
Recently, the Technic launched
the innovation of special issues.
The first featured automobile
production and the second covered
the International Geophysical
Year.
Upcoming is an issue devoted to
transportation, and, of course, a
75th anniversary issue.
Old Prophecies
"It's interesting to go back to
look at the 'In the News' section
of old Technics," Levin comment-
ed, "and now see things that they
were talking about as coming in
the far future."
Although students edit and write
most of the magazine's features,
faculty members also contribute
to the publication. Unlike such
student publications as Genera-
tion, Gargoyle or The Daily, the
Technic is directly associated with
the University. As part of the
College of Engineering, it has four
faculty advisors.
However, the student staff
writes with a relatively unrestrict-
ed hand. Among engineering stu-
dents, the "Censored by McHigan"
feature last year was fairly notor-
ious.
A new publication, "The Arch,"
was launched last year by the
staff of the Technic. The Arch
serves as the Engineering students'
newsletter. Entirely supported by
advertising, the paper, ranging
from four to eight pages, is distrib-
uted free to the student body.

Rough life or not, engineering
students have found time to build
world-wide circulation for the
Technic. Not only is it sent to
South America, Europe and the

I

you say
you haven't got
CLEAN shirt
OPEN A CHARGE ACCOUNT
Take I t To
Greenes
In Before 10.
READY at FIVE

I

Philippines, but last year two
Moscow libraries requested, and
received, subscriptions.
Levin remarked that, because
Young Returns
To Campus
John J. Young, the director of
the placement office at the Col-
lege of Engineering, has returned
to the University after acting as
coordinator of the Summer Stu-
dent Program of the Boeing Air-
craft Company in Seattle,
There ,Young acted as consult-
ant and evaluator of the program
and also as a counselor for 219
students who were participating
from 57 universities and colleges.
The purpose of the program is
to introduce students to work in
such fields of the aircraft indus-
try as engineering, finance and
manufacturing.

WCBN, the dormitory radio sta-
tion, opens another year of broad-
casting tomorrow when it goes
on the air officially at 7:30 a.m.
Plans for the academic year
include allof last years program
features, with some new innova
-tions and fresh sparkle. There
will be, in addition to regular pro-
grams of news and music, exten-
sive coverage of special events
around campus and events of na-
tional importance, particularly the
upcoming presidential election.
Each studio, in South, East and
West Quads, will continue to air
regular "DJ" shows, featuring
programs of both popular and
classical music. In addition, the
network will continue last year's
custom of feeding FM after the
1 a.m. sign-off, with music
through the rest of the night.
Gov. Williams
To Dedicate
New Building
Governor G. Mennen Williams
will head a delegation of high
state officials invited to the dedi-
cation ceremonies at the new $3,-
250,000 Wasptenaw County Build-
ing next Sunday, Circuit Judge
James R. Breakey, jr., announced
yesterday.
The Governor will bring greet-
ings from the state of Michigan
to those attending the event.
The list of those invited totals
over 3,000, and includes all pres-
ent and a number of former state
officials, court judges, county and
local officers and interested citi-
zens.
The general public is invited to
attend and participate -in the
ceremonies.
Oryanizatton
Notices
September 23, 1956
Guild House, at 9:45 a.m. the Roger
Williams Fellowship student class be-
gins its study of the books of the Old
Testament.
Roger Williams Fellowship Meeting at
6:45 p.m. in the Chapman Room of
the church.
Senior Board Meeting, 7:00 p.m. Mon-
day, Room 3B Michigan Union.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Speak-
er, Donald Brown DDS, "Jesus Christ
Teacher or Lord," 4:00 p.m Lane
Hall.
Student Religious Association. Folk
Dancing Sessions will be resumed, 7:30-
10:00 p.m. on Monday in .the recrea-
tion room. Mr. and Mrs. McGhee will
give instructions. Beginners welcome.

Ili!

I
I

An expanded sports coverage,
especially of local events, is anti-
cipated, but plans are still under
consideration.
The network has announced theI
appointment of three new offi-
cers for the current semester. Phil
Burns, '59, is now SQ station

T

manager. For the network, Don
Mullally, '58, was appointed spe-
cial events director, Paul Ritz-
man, '59E, became chairman of
the network engineering corn-
mittee, and Martin Buchman, '57
BAd, was added to the business
staff.

WELCOME COEDS:
j
Our Collegiate or
IVY League Hairstyles
are Flattering.
r No app'ts needed
* 7 Hairstylists
Tihe Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

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--

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t y ,.

Merchants Smile, Registers
Ring as Students Rush to Buy

,y
:(

Campustown merchants are
calmly handling the University's
record enrollment without an ex-
cess drop of brow sweat.
Storeowners in the area gener-
ally report little, if any, noticable
increase in the annual fall buying
rush.
Bookstores undoubtedly draw
the largest crowds. The manager
of one such shop reported, "We're
so used to jam-packed stores at
this time of year, I guess a differ-
erence of one or two thousand is
hardly perceptable."
Although most merchants state
that the rush has passed its peak,
business is still booming. Sporting
goods stores are busy selling fresh-
men and transfer students most
anything on which is imprinted
that magic blue and yellow word
"Michigan."
In both men and women's cloth-
ing shops, sales personnel state
that the situation seems quite
usual. One salesman in a men's
store asserted, "I suppose it's just
J. 20

the same old story. Freshmen are
anxious to get a few clothes with
the 'college look,' and upperclass-
men want to add to their ward-
robe in order to look more collegi-
ate than the freshmen. But what-
ever their reasons, students are
buying clothes, and I'm drawing
my salary."
An employe of a local variety
store observed that the establish-
ments greatest sales at present
seem to be in classroom supplies
and nik-naks to decorate student
rooms.
Among the campus eating es-
tablishments, owners claim that
the ever popular coffee date after
class and conventional dates are
back in full swing. The operator
of one popular "hamburger haven"
has noticed an increase in the
number of students. He boasted,
"The lines of students are longer
than ever, and as long as they
love hamburgers I'll love them."
Merchants all love students .. .
with money.
.-

,A
ti

11

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4

516 E. Liberty St.
NO 2-3231
Day or Night

,,A

MEMO TO ALL STUDENTS:

ti'
.o ,t'
\

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SOFTI
FLEECY!
WARM!
WEIGHTLESSI

at iiscners

i

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WHEN YOU GRADUATE from the University of Michigan
you will be interviewed by professional, educational, industrial
and governmental representatives who will be interested in you,
your academic record, your extra-curricular activities, and in your
experiences.
BEFORE THEY HIRE YOU, they want to, know what you can
offer them. These personnel interviewers are looking for people
who, in addition to academic achievement, have exhibited abilities
to organize, to manage, and to lead. They want ambitious, creat-
ive and responsible persons on their staffs.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY is offering you an opportunity to
gain experience so that you are better able to meet future demands
that may be placed on you.
NEW TRAINING CLASSES for both business and editorial
staffs will begin this week at the Student Publications Building,
420 MAYNARD STREET.
NO PRIOR EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY. For further in-
formation attend ONE of these introductory meetings:
TRYOUT MEETINGS for the business staff will be 4:15 Wed-

a
;a

for the dewy fresh look of youth ...

We've a huge
collection of new
Fall Dresses .
Sizes from 7-15
... Reg. 10-40
.. . Tall 10-20.
Priced from
X14.95 to .9

Magically - washable Princeton's
FEATH-OR-NYL, in a man-made
miracle of beauty, efficiency and
fashion. Camel, Black, Red, Royal.
Sizes 8-18

illustrated:
MILKMAID CLEANSING
MILK . . . 80°% fresh whole
milk used with water in lieu
of soap, radiant deep-pore
cleansing..........$1.75
MILKMAID EMULSION,
types for dry and oily skin,
10% fresh whole milk with
special emollients. A sooth-

rich in the beauty magic of fresh
milk and cream, blended with rare
unguents, deliciously fragrant, and
completely marvelous in results.
Milkmaid is skillfully formulated
for every skin type and condition
... make-up of incredibly delicate
and flattering shades . . . fra-
grances and bathing adjuncts .. .
all unique in the auick and won-

$1795

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