100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 27, 1955 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1955

THE MICHIGAA DAILY

T~kDA, SPTIVBEI 2, 955'lfE1IslCH.Vf]Aiwil *IAIIV

CAMPUS CLINIC--football plays such as this end zone touch-
down pass to Ron Kramer, from last week's Missouri game, will be
explained to all interested students by Freshman Coach Wally
Weber. Sponsored by the WAA, this third annual football clinic
will be held at 7:15 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, at Waterman Gym.
Y e e
SAATo Offer Clinic
On Football, for Coeds,

Any coeds smelling Pasadena
roses in the air may be interested
in learning a few of the funda-
mental principles of that "con-
glomeration of maneuvers" called
football.
Since providing moral support
for the team is the usual stated
reason, along with other motives,
for making the trip West, a little
nkowledge of the game may come
in very handy.
Those split T's, double wing-
backs, statue of liberty plays, and
quarterback sneaks, all basic to
the gridiron sport and mentioned
daily in newspapers, usually bring
blank expressions to the faces of
the average coed.
Annual Clinic
Taking these facts into con-
sideration, the Women's Athletic
Association is again sponsoring its
annual football clinic at 7:15 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 13, tentatively
scheduled for Waterman Gymnas-
ium.
Designed primarily to give a
basic knowledge of the game to
coeds, interest of University male
students was so great in the pro-
ject, that it is now open to all
interested.
Described as "the genial big man
with the polysyllabic vocabulary,"
Freshman Coach Wally Weber will
be the highlighted speaker.
Weber has made almost as big a

name for himself on the "banquet
circuit" as he has a coach and
player.
Popular Speaker
As an after dinner speaker, and
television and radio analyst, the
popular mentor has been heard by
millions of sports fans .He has
appeared in nearly 400 cities and
1,000 gatherings in the United
States and Canada. Several years
ago he appeared in Varsity Night
as an emcee.
On the field Weber was a rug-
ged fullback on Fielding H. Yost's
last two Big Ten championship
teams in 1925-26. At this time he
was a teammate of the present
University coach, Bennie Ooster-
baan.
Before taking over as freshman
coach, Weber coached the back-
field of three Western Conference
champions.
Sports editor of The Daily, Phil
Douglis,. will be another featured
speaekr. Going into the back-
ground of Michigan football, he
will speak on "The Tradition That
Is Michigan." Several football
players, past and present, includ-
ing ex-captain "Tim" Merritt
Green, are also scheduled to be
present.
As an added attraction some
lucky coed will leave the clinic
as the proud possessor of a football
autographed by Varsity team mem-
bers.'

Book Sales
To Continue
SGC Exchange Takes
Months of Preparation
Books are urgently needed' by
the Student Book Exchange ac-
cording to Ian MacDonald, chair-
man of the project. Demand for
books greatly exceeds the supply
this year.
Exchange workers stated that
books for English 1, chemistry 3,
zoology 1 and all math courses
are especially needed.
The exchange which is located
on the first floor of Angell Hall
near the north exit will close its
doors today. Students may pur-
chase books or bring them in any
time between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Book Lists Available
Book lists for various courses
are available at the exchange. Re-
funds are granted if the wrong
book is purchased.
Seven thousand book covers do-
nated by a local bottling company
are being given to, students pur-
chasing books.
Approximately 45 students have
worked at the Exchange during
the sales.
Just "Dropped In"
One worker just "dropped in"
to look for a math book and de-
cided to offer his services until
the book he wanted was turned
in. The book eventually turned
up, but he has continued work-
ing.
Wheels began turning last spring
in preparation for this year's book
sale. Under the sponsorship of
the Student Government Council
the Exchange was set up with
MacDonald as chairman and Bill
Haney as assistant chairman.
The next step in the operation
was the collection of books by
representatives in residence halls,
sororities and fraternities.
Stored in Quonset Hut
After the books were collected
they were stored in SGC's quonset
hut during the summer.
All book buying and. selling is
done on a self-serve basis to keep
operating costs at a minimum.
Students having books to sell set
then own prices.
A 10% commission is charged
on all sales. This is used to cover
operating expenses.
The Book Exchange was estab-
lished to provide a central organi-
zation whereby students could buy
and sell used books at a minimum
of loss.
It was originally sponsored by
the Inter-Fraternity Council, and
then for several years by the Stu-
dent Legislature until it was taken
over by SGC this year.
Union Tryout
Union officials have announ-
ced that posts are open for new
men in the student offices.
A tryout "smoker" at which
men will have an opportunity to
learn about the different activi-
ties will be held at 4 p.m. to-
morrow and 7:15 Thursday in
Rm. 3S of the Union.

KNOCKS:

College Board Contest Opens

Mademoiselle Magazine is now
accepting applications from under-
graduate women for membership
in its 1955-56 College Board.
The College Board Contest of-
fers freshman as well as seniors a
chance to win one of the twenty
Guest Editorships, which include
a month on the staff of the maga-
zine in New York City.
For the fifty runner-ups,
Mademoiselle will provide good
recommendations to magazines,
newspapers, and advertising agen-
cies, which may facilitate a career
in fashion.
Receive Assignments
Coeds accepted on the College
Board do two assignments during
the school year. They may write
feature stories about life on their
campus, submit art work or fea-
tures on fashions, fiction or pro-
motional ideas for passible use in
Mademoiselle.
Members who come out among
the top twenty win a Mademoiselle
guest editorship and will be
brought to New York to help write,
edit, and illustrate the August
college issue.
They will be paid a regular sal-
ary for their month's work plus
round-trip transportation to New
York City.
Numerous Activities
While- in New York each guest
editor takes part in a full calen-

j
1

dar of activities. She interviews a November 30 is the deadline for
celebrity in her chosen field, visits applying for College Board mem-
fashion workrooms, newspaper of- oership. Any undergraduate women
fices and advertising agencies, be- interested may choose one of four
sides working daily with the editor 'ways to apply .
to whom she is assigned. Aplications Varv

Receiving help in finding posi-
tions in their fields, many guest
editors join Mademosielle's own
staff.

I

II

I

6cp044 Campu4

l

BIG SISTER CHAIRMAN . .
The Big Sister Chairman Com-
mittee will meet at 3 p.m. today at
the League. All members are asked
to attend.
LEAGUE COUNCIL ... There
will be a League Council meeting
at 4 pm.. tomorrow at the League.
The room number will be posted.
SENIOR SOCIETY . . . There
will be a Senior Society meeting at;
9 p.m. Monday at the League.
**
DAILY TRYOUTS ... Women
interested in working on the Wo-
men's Staff of The Daily are
invited to attend tryout meetings
at 4 p.m. tomorrow and 7:15 pm..
Thursday in the Student Publica-
tions Building.

Those interested may write al
brief critique of the August, Sep-
tember, October or November
Mademoiselle. If interested in art,
coeds may draw a cartoon series on
any phase of campus life or illus-
trate at least one story published
in Mademoiselle during the past
year.
Third in choice of assignments
will be to describe and illustrate an
ideal week end wardrobe for a
woman at the University.
Last, a coed entering the contest
may do a layout or copy or both
for at least one promotional piece
encouraging students to enter the
College Board contest.
Successful candidates will be
notified of acceptance before
Christmas. The first College Board
assignments will appear in Madem-
oiselle's January issue.
Mademoiselle also is sponsoring
a fiction contest and an art con-
test. The fiction contest offers
$500 and publication to each of
two winners, while the art con-
test winners will receive $500 each
and will illustrate the prize fiction
short stories.

t

OPPORTUNITY

KNOCKS

Ii

i . __

N W dBOS and SUPPLIES
for all University Core
Best Buys In Town!
headquarters for the Professional and Amateur Artist
WA H R'SUNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
. 316 SOUTH STATE
MICHIGAN'S OLDEST AND MOST COMPLETE BOOKSTORE

111!

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Sponsored by WAA
Oxford Grey, Navy, and White Flannel.
Also White Shetland Wool.
SALES OPEN TO PUBLIC
ORDERS TAKEN
September 29 and 30 from 10 to 5
At Women's Swimming Pool
.4{";;{::r.I }r...:.ir:i .:".'"} w:::::":;p::}? }:":. "x .

i

I_

I

jersey

as.j~(c

plain
9 'fa c

Everyc
Long1
of
remo
an tin
Char
Blu
Sizes 8.
The Deep
Prettier th
"We

detail correct
Line Sheath

Vedero

With

vable collar
y velvet bow

dresses
nds
15
o 24h
20

I

I

N
1/

coal Brown
e & Grey
-18 at 17.95
Beaver Cloche
an ever at 8.95
ar-Rights"

Other smart
of all ki
Sizes 7-
10-44, 12 t
Tall 10-

4-i I Lw- xx X -Wl MAVIO, -.e 100,

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan