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January 19, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-01-19

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THE MIIGA MA1Tf&V

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AY, JANUARY 19, 1950

E .

EEN AS 'POWER FOR GOOD'
Williams Speaks On Atomic Energy

9,-- -

By SUZANNE JESSUP

"Answering the challenge of
ises for atomic energy is one of
he most important problems fac-
rg the' nation," Gov. G. Mennen
Villiams said in a speech yester-
lay.
Speaking to the closing session
f the Michigan Pastors' Confer-
nce, Williams said that atomic
nergy can be a power for good
n human life. "It is a challenge
o the clergy to find a solution to
his problem within our time."
ktomic energy must be turned to
he development of man's mind
nd soul, Williams stated emphati-
ally.
"This new technology of auto-
nation means that in the auto in-
lustry where 500 thousand men
re employed today, 100,000 work-
rs will be needed in 10 years," he
aid. Either five times as many

cars will be sold or unemployment
will result, he added.
No One Will Suffer
However Williams believes that
if the problem is handled correctly
no one will have to suffer. This
will provide an opportunity for
people to live more nearly as God
intended them to, making wide
use of leisure, he stated.
Continuing his discussion of cur-
rent social problems, Williams'
stated that the farm problem
shouldn't be viewed with complac-
ency. "It is necessary to keep ex-
perimenting until the right an-
swer is found," he said.
"As far as foreign aid is con-
cerned failing to do what is neces-
sary is national suicide," Williams
said. If members of both parties
fail to solve this problem, they are
acting against the best interest of
the country, he charged.
Need Moral Force
Stressing the need for moral
force, Williams called the McCar-

thy episode, "a symptom of a na-
tional sickness," and added, "The
American nation must have a
strong faith in order to success-
fully combat communism." Wil-
liams cited the Till case as an
example of failure to live accord-
ing to Christian ideals. "This fail-
ure is not limited to any specific
area, it is possible to find similar
examples in everday life," he said.
Williams cited the history of the
FEPC as an example of people of
different faiths achieving success
where politicians have failed. "The
success of the FEPC wasn't achiev-
ed strictly along party lines," he
said. After the issue had hit poli-
tical difficulties, Catholics, Protes-
tants, and Jews furthered the idea
and were instrumental in seeing
it enacted.

AFROTC
Gets L-17
The University's Air Force ROTC
unit has received word from
AFROTC national headquarters in
Montgomery, Ala., that an airplane
will be assigned for its use this
summer.
The plane, an L-17 known as the
Navion, will be used for orienta-
tion flights which enable cadets
to become familiar with flying
techniques.
"The assignment of the Navion
will be a great boost to our pro-
gram," said Col. William H. Park-
hill, Prof. of Air Science. He
added that "We will be able to
live flying with our cadets on a
daily basis."
The four seat plane with cruis-
ing speed of 155 m.p.h. will be
based at either Ann Arbor Air-
port or Willow Run depending on
maintenance arrangements.

Marine Research Continues
In 'U' Naval Tank Laboratory

By DIANE LaBAKAS
Naval and marine engineering
projects are still in progress in
the University's Naval Tank lab-
oratory.
At present research is being con-
ducted on amphibious tractors and
tanks, nuclear reactor power, mer-
chant vessels, barges slated for
Central America, and pitching and
waves for offshore oil tenders.
The research is carried on pri-
marily by Professors Louis A.
Baier, Harry B. Benford, and Ken-
neth Maddocks of the naval ar-
chitecture and marine engineering
department.
The department does work for
bothgovernment and private agen-
Gies from whom they receive their
funds. "There are occasions," said
Prof. Baier, "when we use our own
funds to carry out some personal
research."

I-

Prof. Baler cited work on pro-
pellers, shape of boats, and sta-
bility as problems perpetually in
state of improvement.
A recent revolution in ship
building came with the evolution
of the Forrestal ship. Work is now
being conducted by the Navy on
a new airplane carrier. These
improvements, said Prof. Baier, of-
ten help to illustrate engineering
theories discussed in class.
Since the laboratory was com-
pleted in 1904, improvement in
equipment and techniques encour-
aged a widening field of activity
developed under the successive di-
rections of Prof. E. M. Bragg and
Prof. Baier.
Great Lakes Ships Benefit
"Most of the vessels built on
the Great Lakes during the past
50 years have benefited directly or
indirectly through service from the
University," Prof. Baler declared.
One of the chief contributions of
the department was the design of
a control fin which eliminated fan-
tail vibration in lake carriers. This
device, assisted by Prof. Jesse Or-
mondroyd of the mechanical en-
gineering department, has been
successfully used on about 50 ves-
sels.
"Future activities of the depart-
ment will- continue to further the
economy of the state and nation
in peace or War, said Prof. Baler.

I

I
i

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

{

I

FIRST SEMESTERU
EXAMINATION S CHEDULE

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSICm
January 23 to February 2, 1956
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of, the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instruc-
tor as to the time and place of his examination.

(Continued from Page 4)
Doctforal Examination for Donald
Fredericsk Worpell, Education; thesis:
"A Study of Selection Factors and the
Development of Objective Criteria for
Measuring Success in a Co-operative
General Machine Shop Training Pro-
gram," Thurs., Jan. 26, 4019 University
High School, at 10:00 a.m. Chairman,
H. C. Koch.
Doctoral Examination for Charles'
Stephen Lewis, Education; thesis: "The
Treatment of Foreign Peoples and Cul-
tures in American High-School Litera-
ture Books," Fri., Jan. 27, 4015 Uni-
versity High School, at 2:00 p.m. Chair-
man, S. E. Dimond.
Doctoral Examination for Frederick
John Rogers, English Language and
Literature; thesis: "The Style of Ed-
mund Burke," Sat., Jan. 28, 1437 Mason
Hall, at 9:00 a.m. Chairman, L. I. Bred-
vold.

Placement Notices
The following schools have listed
vacancies. They will send no repre-
sentatives to the Bureau of Appoint-
ments at the present time.
Ann Arbor Area-Teacher Needs for
Second Semester -Nursery (full and
part-time positions).
Frankenmuth, Michigan - Teacher
Needs for Sept., 1956-Senior High Math;
General Science; English; Biology; Li-
brary; Speech; Shop; Foreign Langu-
age; Home Economics.
Lake Forest, Illinois-Teacher Needs
for Sept., 1956-Elementary (Kinder-
garten to Eighth Grade.)
South Orange and Maplewood, New
Jersey-Teacher Needs for Sept., 1956-
High School English; Social Studies;
Math; Driver Education; Guidance;
French. %
Wilton, Connecticut - Teacher Needs
for Sept., 1956-English; Social Studies;
Foreign Language (French and Span-
ish or German); Science-Math combi-
nation; Commercial; Librarian.

For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
U.S. Civil Service announces openings
and exam for Physicists, Chem. Engrg.
Mathematicians, and Chemists. Appli-
cations must be in by Feb. 7, 1956.
Mich. State Civil Service announces
exams for , Vocational Rehabilitation
Field Agent 1A and II. Both require an
MA and II requires experience in voca-
tional rehabilitation also. There is also
an exam for Account Clerk A and B.
Oak Ridge Nat'l Lab., Oak Ridge,
Tenn., announces Postgraduate Train-
ing in Nuclear Reactor Engrg. at the
Oak Ridge School of Reactor Tech. This
is open to selected staff members of
the lab., who are U.S. citizens and have
a BA in Chem., Math., Physics, Mech.
E., Chem. E., Metal. E. or Elect. E.
Applications must be in by March 1,
1956.
For information contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
Ext. 371.

B

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

;;

I

REGU
Time of Class
(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
Y (at 12
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3
(at 4

I MOIMA'

LAR SCHEDULE
Time of Examination
Friday, January 27
Monday; January 23
Wednesday, January 25
Monday, January 30
Thursday, February 2
Wednesday, February 1
Thursday, February 2
Wednesday, February 1
Thursday, February 2
Saturday, January 28
Tuesday, January 24
Thursday, January 26
Tuesday, January 31
Thursday, February 2
Monday, January 30
Tuesday, January 31

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12.
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5

TUESDAY

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

I

SPECIAL PERIODS

LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

English 1, 2
Economics 71
Psychology 253, 262
Sociology 1, 60
Spanish 1, 2, 21, 31, 32,
German 1, 2, 11, 31
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 21, 31,
32, 61,62
Russian 1
Psychology 31
Political Science 1
Chemistry 182, 183
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54,
101, 153
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 20
Economics 72

Monday, January 23
Monday, January 23
Monday, January 23
Tuesday, January 24
Wednesday, January 25
Wednesday, January 25
Thursday, January 26
Thursday, January 26
Friday, January 27
Saturday, January 28
Saturday, January 28
Monday, January 30
Tuesday, January 31
Thursday, February 2

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
235
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
5-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

12

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Bus. Ad. 11 Monday, January 23
Bus. Ad. 12 Thursday, February 2
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
English 11 Monday, January 23
Ch. - Met. 1, 107 Tuesday, January 24
C. E. 22 Tuesday, January 24
K. M. 1 Tuesday, January 24
Drawing 1 Thursday, January 26
Drawing Ix Friday, January 27
C. E. 20 Friday, January 27
M. - I. 136 Friday, January 27

Drawing 2, 3
M. - 1. 135
R M. 2

Saturday, January 28
Saturday, January 28
Saturday, January 28

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS

LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classificatiori Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Engineering Building
between December 14 and January 9 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit
of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bul-
letin board in the School of Music.

"business

"sociology'

9science

Whatever your major, consider a career
with Michigan Bell-where you'll find
a chance to make the most of your
education and abilities.
You see, Michigan Bell has a great

begin . .. merit raises that come with-
out asking ... the thrill of promotions
to even more important jobs ... the
many new friends you'll meet. (Don't
forget the fun of a vacation with pay!)
7.,,....i. _ 11 .z- - ---1

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