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January 18, 1956 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-01-18

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X

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY

SRC Report-
Lists Results
Of 'Air Raid'
Oaklan 1 Testing
Uses Surprise
In Oakland, California, May 5,
1955, was a day when air raid si-
rens blew, announcing for all prac-
tical purposes a surprise enemy
attack
There had been no previous pub-
lic warning: this was it. At least,
that is what the government want-
ed the people of Oakland to think.
Civilian Defense was interested to
know if all of the elaborate warn-
ing system machinery would ac-
tually be effective when the people
needed it.
The results, as later investigated
by the Survey Research Center at
the University are interesting for
they show that although three-
fourths of the people of Oakland
heard the warning, only fifteen
per cent thought there was going
to be an enemy attack.
Suggestion Given
Nine out of twenty people, when
they heard the siren did absolute-
ly nothing about it. Another nine
out of twenty tried to get informa-
tion of some sort, even if it was
nothing more than looking out the
window to turning on the radio,
which, by the way, is the correct
thing to do. Only two out of twen-
ty tried to protect themselves.
Surprising enough, no one tried
to leave thecity.
It was discovered that the main
reason most people did not take
the siren seriously was because of
the frequent number of previous
siren tests. And although this one
was not announced, as all the oth-
ers had been, more than three-
fourths of the people paid no at-
tention.
But what is more important,
more than three-fourths said that
if the same thing would happen
again, they still would not pay any
attention to it.
Suggestion Biven
It was suggested by the Survey
Research Center that a different
tone siren be used for the, tests;
and in that way when a genuine
attack comes people will know
that the sounding sirens are not
Just being tested.
Oakland was believed to be one
of the best cities in the country
as far as preparation for an ato-
mic attack is concerned.
The results of the test would
have been undoubtably different
If confirmation of an attack had
been broadcast over the radio,
the Survey noted. As it was, the
sirens only gave warning.
Fire Hazard Talk
Dr. George J. Thomas of the
University of Pittsburg will discuss
"Fire and Explosion Hazards in
Hospitals and Their Control" at
8 p.m. tonight in the second floor
ampitheater of University Hospi-

-aily--am ning
HILL AUDITORIUM (LEFT) AND ANGELL HALL (RIGHT) ARE TWO CAMPUS BUILDINGS DESIGNED BY ALBERT KAHN.

Coliege
Roundup
By TED FRIEDMAN
According to an Ohio University
Post poll, students there are in fav-
or of having more Greek letter
organizations on campus by four
to one.
Reasons students gave for their
answers stressed limited space in
fraternities and sororities. More-
over they "help students to learn
cooperation," a freshman said.
* * *
In Toronto, fraternities have
come under attack from an unlike-
ly source.
"Hush Free Press," a Toronto
paper similar to U.S. Confidential
type magazines, blasts local frat-
ernities for their "infamous" be-
havior where the three R's have
been converted to Rye, Rum and
Revelry.
In a blistering front-page ex-
pose of "drunken, all-night or-
gies," it asks, "Are these the frat-
ernities which have been elevated
in song and story as one of the
most sought-after goals of a uni-
versity student? . . . It doesn't
take many bad apples to spoil the
whole barrel, and now is the time
for those in authority to do a little
meticulous sorting."
An all male staff has been ap-
pointed to the Oklahoma Daily's
women's page
* * .
Michigan State plans to build
still another new men's dormitory.
The new construction plans were
approved in spite of a rash of new
dormitory building. Board mem-
bers were told that by 1958 three
students would be crowded into a
room.
MSU President Hanna reported
the university's request for' $19,-
166,000 for operating expenses had
been cut to $18,500,000 by the
State Budget Department.
It was also decided the Univer-
sity will purchase 1,000 shares of
Ford stock at an estimated $70,500
when it becomes available.

SUITS

TOPCOATS

SPORTCOATS
20%/off
Alterations at cast

BARGAIN
DAYS
ARE HERE!

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Ex-Office Bo Dsi '' Buildings

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By JIM BOW}
Albert Kahn, whose work can
be found on five continents as
well as in "Who's Who," began
his career in Detroit in 1904. Un-
til his death in 1942, Albert Kahn
served as architect for many of
Detroit's leading automobile com-
panies, and designed buildings for
other firms, some located in De-
troit, others located as far away
as Siberia.
Designs 'U' Buildings
Kahn's work extended beyond
the confines of industrial con-
Strat ford Sets
Shakespeare
Play .Festival
In a brief preliminary an-
nouncement, the Stratford Shake-
spearian Festival Company has
announced plans for its forthcom-
ing season to be held from June
18 to August 18 in Stratford, On-
tario.
The plays to be performed will
be Shakespeare's "Henry V" and
"The Merry Wives of Windsor."
Starring in the two plays will
be Christopher Plummer, Douglas
Campbell, Pauline Jameson, Helen
Burns, Gratien Gelinas and Jean
Gascon. The plays will be directed
by Michael Langham with Decors
by Tanya Moiseiwitsch,
A program of the 1956 music
season will soon be released and
a final brochure giving full details
of the summer schedule will be
available in, early March with the
box office open for mail orders
the week following.
Any one interested in further in-
formation may write to the Pub-
licity Department of the Strat-
ford Shakespeare Festival, 109
Erie Street, Stratford, Ontario.

struction, however, for he de-
signed many buildings on the Uni-
versity campus. Among these
buildings are Angell Hall, Hill Au-
ditorium, University Hospital, and
the General Library.
Kahn's first recognition as a
leading architect came with his
designing of the factory for the
Packard Motor Car Co. built in
Detroit in 1904. For this building,
Kahn used reinforced concrete,
and was the first architect to use
this material in factory construc-
tion.
Kahn's own words which were
printed in the Architectural For-
um in 1938, describe the situation
when he designed the Packard
plant. "When I began, the real
architects would design only mu-
seums, cathedrals, capitols, monu-

ments. The office boy was consid-
ered good enough to do factory,
buildings. I'm still that office boy'
designing factories. I have no dig-
nity to be impaired."
Establishes Firm
That "office boy" established
one of America's largest architec-
tural firms, Albert Kahn, Inc., Ar-
chitects and Engineers. This firm
designed such structures as the
Ford Rouge Plant, the Fisher
Building, and the General Motors
Building in Detroit.
In his work Kahn was famous
for stressing the practical ele-
ments of his field. This was
brought out by his own words,
"Architecture is 90% business and
10% art," as well as by his firm,
which employed 'plumbers and

electricians along with architects
and engineers.
Kahn worked as an office boy
for architectural and engineering
firms, and in 1890 he received a
fellowship to study architecture in
Europe. When he returned to the
United States, Kahn launched his
architectural career, which even-
tually led him to Detroit in 1904.
Another opportunity came ear-
lier in Kahn's life. This was the
offer,of a position as office boy in
an architectural office. Albert
Kahn didn't take the job because
he was afraid he wouldn't have
been able to keep it. He knew that
the previous boy had been fired.
The name of that office boy-
Frank Lloyd Wright, and the rea-
son he was . fired-"no artistic
ability."

Bathrobes
and
ALL WINTER
Jackets
Fur Collar
Storm Coats

N

a

1-Shiris $3.95 to $5.95 Now 2 for $4.95
2-Ties $1.50 to $3.50 .Now 2 for $1.55
3-Elastic Belts $2.50 . ... Now 98 cents

.

4-Ladies' flannel PJ's $5.95

Now $3.95

'yo'reJ~ahe

i Ort !

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SPORT SHIRTS

:1

there's always a sale going on at Bob Marshall's...

,

right now it's a sexed-up special, with hundreds
and hundreds of buys for Ann Arbor Bargain Days ...
you'll be tempted, tantalized, titillated ..
BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOP
211 South State-Across from Lane Hall-Open 6 nites till 10
BROWSERS WELCOMED

LONG SLEEVE
1/2 off
Sweaters... $5.95
One Group
SAFFIELIL & BUSIH
STATE STREET
For Over a Quarter Century

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WINTER BARGAIN DAYS
PAJAMAS
Values $4.95-$5.95

. . . . . ....fOWWV
:'4Rf ; r :r".?:'r .. }- r{------{+'r'r.::el'. "asr :"{n. Vt?:.;;,':'t."ritr "}::":;"i...A.. . . . .'i r"'";:::, :

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WINTER BARGAIN DAYS

Special Group

now $319

Knox Hats $59
$10.00 and $15.00 Values
Cashmere a Wool Sweaters

COLORED SHIRTS

9

Limited armount whites
Famous Brand
$2 91

Plain colors

Were $13.95

V-Neck Pullovers

$7951
now 75

Famous Make

GLOVES and SCARFS

HOSIERY SPECIAL
The kind you like!

1/3 off

1/2 off

Shoe

Sale-

Biggest Ever

LEATHER JACKI

PHI BATES and FREEMANS
Values $13.95 to $17.95

®;

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a: v .a i
Y ! Y 1 Y+ t P ! t Y t 9

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