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January 18, 1956 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAA MAlLY

W EON EbDA Y, JANUARY 18, 1938

'jUL MIEUI4iAN DAILY WIA)NI~I)AY, JANUARX ~8, 1P~6

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SKI EQUIPMENT

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I1eet Your IMichigan

SAFETY COUNCIL MAKES STUDY:
Statistics Show Autos More Dangerous Than Airlines

HASN HO ELSS. E G
MIHGNPAE EODFDL UIGTEGREAT CHICAGO FIRE OF OCTOBER 8,1871.WHILE
DIVENFLAMETHESAMEHHWN EAD
RUG H FIRES ACROSS SOUTHERN MICNIGAN.
STDYDMANISTEE ANDLET 9000 MICHIGAN
RESDENTS HOMELESS.- -
sU I s N ME ECEDED THE PRES-
ENT TITLES OF MANY MICIGAN COUNTIES. AN EX-
AMPLE IS CLARE COUNTY, ONCE CALLED KAYKEE
ECOUNTY AFTE A CHIPPEWA CHIEF FROM THE SAULT
WHOSE NAME MEANT'PIGEON HAWK:IT WAS RE-
SNAMEDAFTER CLARE COUNTY,IiELA1W. IN 1843.
FRENCH COUREURSDE8f:) DDL (NT1 -Z
CARGO CANOES LADEN WITH FURS AND TRADIN-
GOODS ALONG MICHIGAN WATERWAYS WERE A HARDY
BREED. THEIR ENTIRE DAILY FOOD RATION WAS A WART
OF HULLED CORN MIXED WITH BEAR GREASE.THE MIX-
TURE WAS COMMERCIALLY CONCOCTED IN DETROIT.
y CKIPUKGws MIO4IQ* SONS=
RUDYARD HIPLING, FAMED ENGLISH POET AND
-' AUTHOR, ONCE PENNED A POEM ACK4NOWLEDGING
"" 0 D AND HONORING HIS TWO MICHIGAN"SONS -
THE UPPER PENINSULA TOWNS OF RUDYARD
AND IIPLING. THE COMMUNITIES WERE
NAMED FOR THE GREAT POET IN 189%.
VeY/t'4A' /4IT1/qE 8Fi9A5T gut e' ,/C'//M4 70'/& 4-/ CQ/!'Ytf/L.., A 82

By ROGER D. GREENE
Associated Press Newsfeatures Write?
The nation recoils in shock when
a giant airliner smashes into the
earth with a dramatic toll of lives
snuffed out, but the automobile is
still America's No. 1 killer-by a
huge margin.
Death on the highway has be-
come almost prosaic compared to
the stunning impact of tragedy in
the skies.
Year after year, however, cold
statistics reflect the fact that you
are taking a bigger gamble when
you drive off in your automobile
than when you board an airplane,
train or bus.
Chart Gives Details
As the accompanying large chart
shows, over the past decade the
death rate per million passenger
miles of automobile and taxi travel
has remained far above the fatality
rate for trains and busses. With
the lone exception of 1947, the auto
death rate has been well above that
of scheduled airplanes, for which
the safety record has continued to
show marked improvement over
the years.
In 1954 scheduled airlines had
a death rate per 100 million pass-
enger miles of only .09. The. auto
and taxi rate was 2.6.
Significantly, the scheduled air-
lines have made this improvement
in safety while steadily increasing
the number of passenger miles
traveled. In 10 years they have
boosted their passenger miles from
31/ billion to slightly above 17
billion. Auto and taxi travel has
almost doubled in the same period.
Travel in busses and trains has
declined.
While the number of deaths in
accidents involving planes and
trains-and to a lesser extent, bus-
ses-fluctuates widely from year to
year, the, deaths caused by auto-
mobile accidents moved steadily
upward from 1949 through 1953.
A slight drop occurred in 1954.
Worst Year
The worst year in American avia-
tion history -- excluding military
deaths in the war years-came in
1947, when 199 airline passengers
lost their lives. The death rate per

100 million passenger miles that
year was 3.2.
As of the first of November, 182
persons had been killed in domestic
airline crashes this year-includ-
ing the two big tragedies which
saw 44 persons killed near Long-
mont, Colo., on Nov. 1 and 66 per-
ish at Medicine Bow Creek, Wyo.,
on Oct. 6 in the worst commercial
airlines disaster in U.S. history.
However, officials of the Civil
Aeronautics Board say that barring
a further sequence of major disas-
ters, 1955 will fall far short of the
death rate record set in 1947. CAB
officials say the 1955 figure is ex-

pected to be less than one fatality
per 100 million passenger miles.
The National Safety Council
says motor vehicles claim a human
life every 15 minutes and inflict
injury every 25 seconds. Breaking
the motoring hazard down, the
council reports that five Western
per 100,000 population in 1954. New
100,000 population in 1954. New
Mexico topped the list with a
whopping rate of 51.0, followed by
Wyoming with 50.7, Arizona with
44.0, Idaho with 39.7 and Montana
with 36.9.
On the low side, Massachusetts
had the safest 1954 record with a
rate of 9.1 deaths per 100,000 pop-

ulation, followed by the District of
Columbia with 9.9, Connecticut
with 11.9, New York with 13.2 and
New Jersey with 15.7.
Incidentally, the next time you
hang on for dear life in a taxi
while the driver zigs through rush-
hour traffic with seeming suicidal
intent, the National Safety Coun-
cil has this word of comfort:
Of a total of 43,000 motor ve-
hicles involved in fatal accidents
last year, less than one-half of
one per cent were taxicabs. Pass-
engers cars were involved in 78
of the death-dealing accidents,
trucks 19 per cent, and busses,
motorcycles and other vehicles one
.>per cent each.

1945 1946_1942 1948_1949 1950_1951_1952 1953 1954
3.2II

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Skis

Poles

Bindings
Parkas

Ski Pants

Hen ke Boots

GE No. 5
FLASH BULBS
2 dozen -$2.00
THE QUARRY

- r m . m
DEATH RATE PER 100
MILLION PASSENGER MILES
IN AUTOS AND TAXIS, BUSSES, TRAINS,
AND SCHEDULED AIRPLANES

1.5

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711 N. University - HAROLD S. TRICK -- 902 S. State
;.}S . } , 1r ,a; ,rti;, ,rn;},m .. r ., sh ;?fi':;: ':;: f;:Y.t::., . 5 ' .}

320 South State

NO 3-4111l

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

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60, TRENDS INBILLIONS
OF PASSENGER MILES
90 TR AVELED
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i BUSSES
RAILROAD TRAINS /
SCHEDULED AIRPLANES

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SI OURCE:NATIONAL SAFETYCOUNCIL

AP Newsfeatures

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY

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ANN ARBOR'S FIRST

CITY-WIDE

BARGAINS GALORE!
One Group of DRESS SLACKS

;4

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SELLING EVENT

OF THE YEAR

NOW IS THE TIME TO SATISFY

Remainder of Slacks . . . . . . $9.99 pr.
Values to 16.95
SPORT SHIRTS - - ONLY $1.00
Complete stock of long-sleeve cotton and flannel shirts
Please Read .
BUY ONE SPORT SHIRT at regular price
Get SECOND one for 1.00
Fa.mous-name colored DRESS SHIRTS
Values to 4:50 ....NOW 2.66
Complete Stock of FALL JACKETS . . . . . . 30% OFF
Short Style - Long Style - Wool - Gabardine - Nylon -
Corduroy - Reversibles
One Group of SUEDE JACKETS . . . . . . . $9.90
SWEATERS--Bnlnncofour Stck...30/ OFF

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YOUR SHOPPING NEEDS

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VVl I '

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