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September 25, 1955 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1955

...

PAGETWOTHE ICHGAN AIL

SUNDAY. SPTEMBER L 5Kgo

'to

O C"
2&Ina '_la, on Stucl-
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ALTERATION: ALL TYPES: WORK BY APPOINTMENT
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Phone NO 2-8547 340 So. State-Second Floor
Iiio o s moI .1os m o ii

Michigan Plans Reopening
Of Cheboygan Water Route

COMPLETION SET FOR 1956:
Work Begins On Activities Building

DETROIT(LP)-The scenic Che-
boygan inland water route, a pop-
ular cruise course in the early
1900's, will be reopened in another
year, the Michigan Waterways
Commission said yesterday.
The Army Corps of Engineers,
who designed the plans, will let
contracts for the $326,000 project
within the next few weeks.
Preliminary work will begin this
winter and full scale operations
will be carried out next summer.
The route originally was opened
up by the War Department in
1876. It runs from Cheboygan up
the Cheboygan River to Mullett
Lake, through to Indian River to
Burt Lake, up the Crooked River
to Crooked Lake and across
Crooked Lake to Conway, a small
village about three miles inland
from little traverse bay.
D e c a d e s ago, flat-bottomed
steamers cruised the 35-m i1 e

course. But the route became filled
with sand bars and decayed
pilings, and erosion-caused hair-
pin turns have further cut down
navigability.
Plans call for dredging the en-
tire route to a minimum depth of
five feet and width of 30 feet.
Many of the treacherous turns will
be straightened out and several
jetties will be constructed to con-
trol the amount and depth of sand
deposits.
Fred B. Lif ton, acting director
of the Waterways Commission,
said engineering problems make a
further cut from Conway to
Little Traverse Bay prohibitively
costly, but pleasure boats could
be transferred across land to Lake
Michigan in a matter of minutes.
Lifton said the commission is
considering constructing numerous
parks along the route.

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"A keenly piercing drama of a
wrecked marriage, so realistic
that it hits with the force of
a demolition machine."
-N.Y. Daily News
"An unusual, startling film
with performances that jar
you with their individuality."
-N.Y. Times

Doors Open
at 12:45

November is the month set for
breaking ground for the new Stu-
dent Activities Bldg.
Costing $1,750,000,the building
will be on the corner of Maynard
and Jefferson, just south of the
Student Publications Bldg.
Architect's plans for the build-
ing are nearing completion and
blueprints will be sent to the
contractors for bids October 1,
with bids due December 1.
To Finish in November, '56
With the completion date set
for about November, 1956, cam-
pus organizations are looking for-
ward to new and larger offices
and work sections for their re-
spective groups.
Built on three levels, the build-
ing will contain offices on the
first floor for the major student
activities. These include Student
Government Council, Panhellenic,
Interfraternity Council, Inter-
House Council and Assembly As-
sociation.
The Dean of Women's offices
and the Building Administration
Committee office will also be on
the first floor. The Administration
Committee will deal with alloca-
tion of workshops, smaller offices
and facilities of the building.
Smaller Offices on Second Floor
On the second floor will be the
smaller offices of the Glee Club,
Wolverine Club, International
Students Association, Alpha Phi
Omega and other similar student
activities. The Dean of Men's offi-
ces will also be housed on the
second floor.
Large meeting rooms, Joint
Judiciary headquarters and pro-
jection rooms will make up the
third floor.
In the basement of the new
building the Student Book Ex-
change and the .Art Print Loan
Collection will have their perma-
nent offices. Student files and a
mimeographing room will also be
housed here.
Workshop for Student Use
The workshop will include
areas for making props for stu-
dent productions, paint spraying
rooms, tool storage rooms, car-
pentry shop, and a sewing room.
A receiving area, back terrace,
and employees' lounge for the
dean's offices constitute the re-
mainder of the building.
The committee which formu-
lated plans and discussed the feas-
Ford Plans Office
DET R OIT (P)-Ford Motor
Company's Ford Division today
announced plans for a new $10,-
000,000, five-story general office
building.
It will be built on a 67-acre
tract at the southwest corner of
Southfield Road and Rotunda
Drive in Dearborn, a short dist-
ance from the big Ford Rouge
Plant and other company instal-
lations. It also will be near Ford's
skyscraper general office building
now under construction at -South-
field and Michigan Avenue.
The Ford Division office build-
ing will have what is known archi-
tecturally as a "floating design"-
the first level recessed 12 feet in-
side the upper four floors to per-
mit a weather-protected walkway
on all four sides.

SITE BEING CLEARED FOR NEW
STUDENT ACTVITIES BUILDING

AEC Reports
Atomic Blast
Set by USSR
WASHINGTON(P) The Atomic
Energy Commission reported yest-
erday the Russians have set off
another nuclear explosion, "in-
dicating a continuation of their
tests of nuclear weapons."
Here is the text of the announ-
cement:
"Lewis L. Strauss, chairman of
the U. S. Atomic Energy Commis-
sion, stated yesterday that an-
other Soviet nuclear explosion had
occurred in recent days, indicat-
ing a continuation of their tests
of nuclear weapons.
"Further announcements con-
cerning the Soviet test series will
be made only if some information
of particular interest develops."
Russian Weapons
Only Friday; Gen. Thomas
White, vice cheif of the Air Force,
told a Pentagon gathering of in-
dustrial, business and professional
leaders that the Russions are per-
fecting new atomic weapons and
guided missiles.
The Soviets are carrying out an-
other nuclear test, White said,
"right after the summit confer-
ence at Geneva" on peace. Last
Aug. 4 the AEC disclosed that Rus-
sia had resumed the testing of
nuclear weapons. The announce-
ment then said that the tests
began "within the past few days"
and "this may mean the begin-
ning of a new test series."
I-Hop Committee
A meeting will be held for girls
interested in working on either
decorations or tickets committees
for I-Hop at 3 p.m. Tuesday in the
Michigan League.
I-Hop publicity committee will
meet at 4 p.M. tomorrow in the
League.

ibility of the new building was
made up of the Deans of Men
and Women, James A. Lewis of
the Office of Student Affairs, Uni-
versity architect Lynn W. Fry, J.
Swanson, building architect, rep-
resentatives of University Vice-
President Wilbur K. Pierpont's of-
fice and the student representa-
tive, Richard Good, '56.
The Board of Regents accepted
the preliminary plans and, blue-
prints at its July meeting.
Condemnation in Progress
Condemnation proceedings are
still in progress but, according to
Good, these will not hold up the
start of construction. He added
that the new building will be fl-
nanced from the general Univer-

sity fund and that no specific ap-
propriation has been made by the
State Legislature.
Problems such as light, loca-
tion, amount of space to be al-
loted various groups, type of con-
struction, and necessary facili-
ties all were given serious consid-
eration by the committee accord-
ing to Good.
Holding 56,000 square feet for
student offices and meeting rooms,
the new building will ease the
overcrowded conditions that or-
ganizations have had to contend
with in their present locations.
Provision for additions to the
building has been planned for so
that when needed, necessary ad-
ditions can be easily made.

also
TOM & JERRY
"Designs on Jerry"

Sororities
May Soon
Join FBA,

Campus Leaders Air Views
At NSA Summer Convention

-

1

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DAY AND EVENING SCHOOL
CLASSES NOW FORMING
Practical training for office positions, at a saving in time and money.
Free Placement Service.
Secretarial Stenotype
Accounting Speedwriting
Stenographic Dictaphone
Bookkeeping Business Machines
Able teachers, college-grade student body. Interesting school activities.
Pleasant classrooms.

s v

(Continued from Page 1)
filled by election. Knutson will
occupy the seventh, pending
approval by the stewards.
Started Last Year
FBA was started at the Univer-
sity last year after several years
of frustration and failure. In es-
sence it is a cooperative buying
plan that enables fraternities to
save money by buying in bulk.
Savings now average more than
10 per cent and it is conceivable
they will mount to as high as 25
per cent.
All canned products and some
paper products are handled by
FBA. Present plans call for expan-1
sion into practically every area of
merchandise.
Originally inititated by IFC,
FBA plans to become completely
independent as soon as possible.
In addition to recognition as a
student group by Student Govern-
ment Council, the Association will
be incorporated under the laws of
Michigan.

Harry Lunn, '54, former Daily
Managing Editor, presided over the
National Student Association Con-
gress held in Minneapolis, August
21-31.
In preparation for the general
theme of the Congress which dealt
with the aims of the educational
community in the United States
today and the position of student
government in making students
realize these aims, Lunn worked
closely with educational organiza-
tion during the past year.
Made up of student government
representatives, from member
schools, the Congress offered cam-
pus leaders a chance to exchange
and clarify ideas.
Accompany SGC Members
James H. Robertson, Assistant
Dean of the literary college, James
A. Lewis, Vice-President for Stu-
dent Affairs, James M. Davis, di-
rector of the International Center,
and Mrs. Ruth Callahan of the
Office of Student Affairs accom-
panied StudentGovernment Coun-
cil representatives to the Congress.
Janet Neary, '57, was selected
chairman of the Michigan Region
of the NSA at the convention.
Formed of member universities,
students from 56 foreign coun-

YOUNG MEN -- Prepare
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The Home
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NOW SHOWING

New RoleI
JACK
WEBB

tries, representives from observer
schools who are considering join-
ing the NSA and college adminis-
trators, the Congress was divided
into a number of commissions and
subcommissions, each dealing with
specific problems such as the 18-
year-old vote, student rights and
responsibilities, man power, dese-
gration of the schools, finances
and other problems related to
campus and community life.
Congress Passes Code
One of the main items passed by
the Congress was the Model
Educational Practices Standards,
which states that '"while it is
recognized that some of the un-
democratic practices in higher ed-
ucation have their roots in history,
every effort should be made to
change those practices where they
are incompatible with democratic
principles."
The code continues to say that
the NSA will seek to secure and
maintain equal rights for all people
and secure equal opportunities for
education at all levels.
Covering admissions to colleges,
college employment policies, schol-
arships, grants and loans, class-
room procedures, student teacher
training, restrictive clauses in stu-
dent social organizations and cam-
pus housing, the code outlines what
the NSA Congress members felt
were fairest measures any school
can offer students.
Voting Age Discussed
Another area of interest con-
cerned a resolution calling for, sup-
port of the 18-year-old vote. Hank
Berliner, '56, SGC president drew
up this resolution as part of his
job on the Legislative Activity Sub-
committee. Only nine votes de-
feated the question.
Donna Netzer, '56, SGC vice-
president, cited the opportunity
the Congress offers not only to
exchange views on similar prob-
lems with other schools, but the
help a member can obtain on a
problem from representatives
whose schools have solved this
same problem.
Delegates Lead Talks
Michigan delegates did their
part in leading discussions. Tau-
ber chaired the subcommission-
dealing with internal organization
of administration of schools.
Dave Baad, '56, Daily Managing
Editor led the Student Press Sub-
commission in which over 30 col-
lege newspapers met to discuss
issues facing them on their separ-
ate campuses.
Berliner took part in the Student
Body President's Conference which
attempted to instill and bring out
the obligation of the student gov-
ernment president to his govern-
ment and the college..
The SGC President also was
acting vice-chairman of the Mich-
igan Region of the National Exec-
utive Commission which served as
the steering body for the NSA.
Discussion Found Profitable

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Great Added Program
Walt Disney's "Beezy Bear" Cinemascope Short
with Donald Duck "Naughty Mermaid"

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SA DLER OF B OSTON takes the high roadl with a handsome

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