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December 08, 1955 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. DEC

-r+rrwW+Y n...

"--'-I1iv TLKk

:EAR-CUT SOUNDS:
Campus Hi-Fi

Use Rises

By GERALD DeMAAGD
What is a high fidelity music
stem and what makes it differ-
xt?
There is no real reason to feel
ferior if you don't have the an-
'ers to questions about the ins
id outs of the high fidelity pho-
graph or tape recorder. For-
nately it is not necessary to be
electrical engineer to under-
and the basic fundamentals of
hi-fi system.
For a good definition of hi-fi,
e company hails it as, "a new
ncept in the supreme enjoyment
music . . . made possible by a
rnbination of audio units which
produce sound with a range and
alism identical to the original
rformance."
More Accurate Sound
A more down to earth estima-
n would simply be that prog7.
ss in the field of electrical engi-
ering has evolved devices that
produce sound with greater ac-
racy.
These machines present music
th greater pleasing effects of
alism or 'presence' than could
'erly be obtained. The advan-
ges that stand out and that
ark high fidelity music as dif-
ent are that the set ups mini-
ze distortion, reproduce a 'wider
quency range, and balance tone.
A fundamental precept of hi-fi

machines is that they can follow
a clarinet to five lines above the
scale. A definite advantage of hi-
fi is its wide frequency range, that
is the ability to reproduce the
highest to the lowest note with
equal clarity. It reproduces not
only the fundamental tones but
the overtones as well, and cap-
tures the identity of a trumpet or
a saxophone.
Finally high fidelity produces
the balance of tone important 'for
real musical enjoyment. All pos-
sible attempt is made to eliminate
screechy or washed-out tones, and
it may be said that high fidelity
has definitely come a long way
since the first Edison "squak box."
Component Systems
Most high fidelity phonographs
on campus are component sys-
tems, that is the various elements
of the completed system were
manufactured by separate com-
panies.I
The commercial high fidelity
phonograph is one in which all the
parts have been made by one com-
pany which has put the completed
unit on the market. Although most
hi-fi addicts look with disdain on
such .players, many persons con-
cede that they are almost as good
as a home arranged system. In
fact some are better . . . if you
have the price.
Before the advent of high fidel-
ity only the curious bothered to

Give RECORDS
FOR CHRISTMAS
The perfect gift for
your college friends
NoV'el Christmas Cards
With amusical motif
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312 South Thayer

find out how the record player
was made. Now high fidelity has
appeared on the campus scene
with all its various components
and mechanisms.
A high fidelity phonograph sim-
plified consists of four compo-
nent parts, the turntable, the cart-
ridge, the amplifier, and the loud
speaker.
Voltages to Amplifier
Music is formed on the record
in the nature of grooves which
waver from side to side with vary-
ing amplitude.
The needle or stylus embedded
in the pickup arm rests in these
ditches and the waves are picked
up by the needle and transferred
into small electrical voltages by
the cartridge in the tone arm.
These voltages are then sent on to
the amplifier.
Coeds Do It, Too
Many students economize on
price without compromising on the
quality of a high fidelity system by
assembling their own amplifiers.
Many men particularly effect quite
a saving in cost this way and sev-
eral coeds on campus who appar-
ently have some mechanical apti-
tude have accomplished the task.
On the average it only takes
about four to five hours to con-
struct an amplifier following the
illustrated instructions furnished
with present kits on the market.
Approximate total cost of a pho-
no system as is usually ordered
from the electronics warehouses
ranges from a minimum of $150 up
into the high price brackets. Most
students order parts through one
or two prominent wholesale agen-
cies that regularly publish a cata-
log.
Sell Blood for Tuner
After the basic hi-fi system has
been purchased many extras may
be added. Chief among these in
local popularity seems to be the
FM radio tuner. Several high fidel-
ity disciples have, sold a pint of
blood in order to purchase this
item. This practice is not gener-
ally recommended, but the tuner
is delightful for listening to elev-
en high fidelity FM (frequency
modulated) radio stations in this
area that offer excellent pro-
grams.
Other common additions are
multiple speakers and improved
enclosures. Some of the more elab-
orate systems have as many as
two dozen speakers, while two is
the usual norm.
For those iha little extra
cash a tape recorder may round
out their electronic inventory.
Since the tape recorder plays
through the amplifier system the
quality is equal. Borrowed records
may be taped and then returned
and in this manner a collection of
many hours of music filed imme-
diately at hand.

'I,

Gaily decorated hand - madev
Christmas cards become more
popular as each December rolls
around.
This hobby has become a stu-
dent fun project, according to
Professor Alex L. Pickens, who di-
rects eight classes in elementary
art education. His classes enable
students to work painting of
Christmas cards into their class
work.
"The trend has been toward
hand-made Christmas cards," said
Prof. Pickens. "These art classes
enable students to apply class work
to a specific need."
Each student buys his own pap-
er, selects a printing process, and
explores techniques at his own
development level.. Printing tech-
niques invojve a choice of wood-
cuts, stencil, silk screen, linoleum
block, and rubber stamp print-
ing.
Once a design is created' it is
transferred to a surface that can
be inked and then printed. Fifty
cards can be printed in two hours
and some students have made up
to 500.
Water soluble printing ink is
used and frequently cards are dec-
orated by hand and then lettered
inside.
Many Decorations
Decorations range from bells.
Trees Here Get
Decor for Season
Campus evergreens were turned
into Christmas trees this week.
The plant department recently
finished its annual work of string-
ing colored lights on trees in front
of the League, President Hatch-
er's home, the library and hospi-
tal. This year in addition de-
partment crews decorated a tree
by the Kresge Building on North
Campus.
Lights have been connected with
the University electrical system
so that they may be turned on
automatically with the rest of
campus night lighting.

fir trees and religious, designs
Santa Claus and children's toys.
Candy canes,berries, and holly
leaves are also popular designs.
Glittering sparkles of many col-
ors'attract most students. Sparkles
may be applied by means of glue
and tinsel.
Joneses Not
Keeping Up
With _Smiths
More people at the University
sign their letters Smith than any
other name..
Student Directory statistics re-
veal that 124 people named Smith
are currently enrolled here. Next
most common surname is Miller,
with 105 members of that family
on campus.
Seventy-four Browns are listed
in the directory, nearly equalled
by the 70 Andersons. Of the John-
son family there are 56 local.repre-
sentatives, with an equal number
-- smaller than is usually expect-
ed -- of Joneses,
The studentbody includes 51
Taylors and 45 people named
Williams.
Forty-one Ann Arbor branches
can be found on the Davis family
tree-one more than their next
rivals, the 40 Moores. Dean and
Jerry have their namesakes, with
39 Lewises and 38 Martins here.
Next on the list, running a close
competition, are 34 Clarks, 30
Thompsons, 29 Halls, 28 Murphys
and 27 Robinsons..
Goldbergs and Lees rank next on
the list, each with 26 bearers at
the University.. The directory
names 25 Schwartzes and 24 Cooks.
Stanley Smith, Grad., said he
normally doesn't think of his name
as being particularly common, but
that he and his wife had to be
careful in naming their new son
to avoid giving him a name too
extreme or, on the other hand, too
common. Their result: Jeffrey
Bradford Smith.

Daily-Dick Gaskill
PERSONAL TOUCH - Coed finishes work on her hand-made
Christmas cards.
Trend In Yule Greetings
Toward Hand-made Cards

"SPECTACULAR"
Three-Part
Sampler
.For U' TV
By ALLAN STILLWAGON
The height of Christmas con-
fusion is usually considered to be
found at Macy's department store,
or possibly Times Square, but
neither can hold a candle (bay-
berry) to the furious preparation
at the University Television stu-
dios.
The one-time funeral home has
assumed a decidedly festive look
during the preparation of "Christ-
mas Studio Sampler," the speech
department's Yuletide "Spectacu-
lar," termed by Director Don
Street as "the biggest thing we've
ever done."
"Christmas Sampler" will require
a staff of over one hundred dur-
ing its staging. Forty-five min-
utes in length, this year's Christ-
mas presentation is the longest
live broadcast ever attempted by
University Television.
Students Do All
From the producer, Gary John-
ston, on down, all work is being
handled by students, including that
of engineers, studio technicians,
sound men, writers, set designers,
and actors.
Scheduled to be telecast on Fri-
day, Dec. 16, the Christmas pre-
sentation will consist primarily of
three dramatic. portions, two of
which were written by University
students.
The first, "The Tree," was first
presented by the Speech Depart-
ment at this time last year. Audi-
ence response wes so favorable
that it is being repeated this year.
"The Tree" is a seasonal message
for adults, written by Joe Cole-
man, '56E, telling of the appear-
ance of the Christmas spirit on a
Christmas tree lot.
Santa Claus 'Problems'
The second vignette, "The Nic-
est Christmas Gift of All," is a
children's story of their favorite
North Pole dweller, Mr. S. Claus.
The old gentleman neglects his
alarm and suffers much more
grevious consequences than the
cutting of an eight o'clock.
The third portion of "Christmas
Sampler" is as familiar as a
wreath on the front door. The
classic, "Yes, Virginia There is a
Santa Claus," will complete the
format of this holiday feature.
Christmas Star
Mystery Unsolved
The mystery of the Christmas
star brings popular interest in
astronomy to a peak in December,
according to Prof. Harel M. Losh
of the astronomy department. And
,t's a mysteryastronomers haven't
solved yet. "The narrative about
the star is too incomplete, the date
of the appearance of the star too
uncertain, the early calendar too
unreliable to lead us to any defi-
lite conclusions, she states

Christmas Gift
from
Saffell & Bush
doubly

appreciated

,

"'":

WE HAVE A VERY COMPLETE SELWC.
TION OF FINE MERCHANDISE FOR THE
DISCERNING MALE. GET HIM THE IDEAL
CHRISTMAS GIFT NOW - BEFORE YOU

GO HOME.

IT'S NICE TO GET IT FROM

SAFFELL N BUSH IN ANN ARBOR.

SAIFIFEILL

&V*

IBUSH

'f4J1t
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
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3
3

STATE STREET
For Over a Quarter Century

exclusive with Camelot Brothers
UNUSUAL GIFTS HAND-MADE
IN ENGLAND

8 CAMPUS SHOPPING DAYS
UNTIL VACATION
Select a Gift from Balfour s
MICHIGAN SEAL MUGS & GLASSES
ASHTRAYS, STEINS, TRIVETS -
DEMITASSE CUP & SAUCERS -p
DEMITASSE SPOONS -LIGHTERS
MICHIGAN SEAL PENDANTS
FRATERNITY-SORORITY CRESTED GIFTS
' GREETING CARDS.... GIFT WRAPPINGS
A COMPLETE SELECTION OF QUALITY
JEWELRY AND NOVELTY ITEMS FOR THE ,
SPECIAL ONES ON YOUR LIST,.. ..
A GIFT BY BALFOUR IS A GIFT
GI THATPLEmASES

1..
FOR THE BROTHER OR SISTER:
Michigan Sweat Shirts
Michigan T-Shirts
Michigan Jackets
Michigan Blankets
R FOR THE JUVENILE:
Michigan Sweat Shirts
Michigan T-Shirts
Michigan Sweaters
FOR THE SKIER
Sweaters
Parkas
Mittens
Boots
FOR THE SKATER:
Ankle Supports
Wooden Walkers
" Rubber Walkers
Toques

Steel lined Ice Bucket, made out of
one-half Rum Keg. As used in the old
English Sailing Vessels . . .$22*
Ginger Hide English Leather Hair Brush
Set . . . . . . $10*
Unfitted Leather Toiletries Case

Leather Fire Bucket and Catch All
o . . . . . . . $20*
Unfitted Leather Trimmed Toiletries
Case . . . . . . * $11.50*
Leather Trimmed Silk Rep Wallet
, . . . . . . . . $8.50*

. . . . . . . . $11.50*
Ginger Hide English Leather Clothes
Brush . . . . . . $5.65*
*Includes Federal Tax

i.

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