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December 01, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-12-01

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M

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1.1955

'U' College of Architecture
To Celebrate Fiftieth Year

Next year the College of Archi-
tecture and Design will celebrate'
its 50th anniversary.
In preparation for the occasion
announcements have been sent
out to the 1250 alumni of the.
Architecture College. Most of these
alumni have established careers
in the field of architecture. Others
have branched out into fields of
construction and sales.
A few graduates of the Architec-
ture college have gone into manu-
facturing and a smaller number
have entered such fields as the
ministry, medicine or writing.
Campus Shows Work
Evidence of work done by the
University's architects can be
found in many sections of the
campus. Although several Univer-
sity buildings may have been de-
signed under the contracts of large
architectural firms, in many cases
the specific design was done by
graduates of the Architecture Col-
lege.
Some of the newer buildings de-
signed by University graduates are
the Cooley Building on North
Campus, the Women's Swimming
Pool, the Business Administration
School, the' Administration Build-
ing, South Quadrangle and Alice
Lloyd Hall. The latter was de-
Original 'Story
To Be Read'
Prof. Allan Seager, of the Eng-
lish department, will give a read-
ing of one of his stories, "Under
the Big Magnolia Tree" at 4 p.m.
today in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall.
The story appeared in the New
Yorker last year.
Prof. Seager is the author of
several successful novels and short
stories,. some of which have ap-
peared in modern anthologies.
His latest novel, "Amos Berry,"
came out in 1953. It is a story of
life in Tecumseh and the Uni-
versity.
Born in Adrian, Michigan, Prof.
Seager came to the University in
1925 and received an AB degree in
1930.
Hewent to Oxford University as
a Rhodes Scholar and studied
under Percy Simpson and Ced-
mund Blunder. He received a BA
degree there in 1933.
When he came back to this
country, he was editor of "Vanity
Fair" until 1939 when he became
an English instructor here.
Now an associate professor in
the English department, he teach-
es advanced creative writing and
is a member of the Hopwood Com-
mittee.

signed by clair Ditchy, past pres-
ident of the American Institute of'
Architects.
Design Important Buildings
In addition to buildings on the
University campus, Architecture.
college graduates have designed
important buildings all over the
nation and in several countries
outside the United States. Some of
these buildings are a number of
American embassies designed by
Ralph Robson.
iravel Show
Set By SGC
To promote student interest in
European tours the travel com,
mittee of Student Governnent
Council will present a travel show
at 7:30 p.m. today in the Union
Ballroom.
The program will feature John
V. Hendricks, Executive Director
of the National Students Associa-
tion. Movies will be shown illus-
trating the highlights of a Euro-
pean trip.
The NSA, a non-profit organi-
zation, sponsors low cost tours.
These trips are designed especially
along the interests of a student
traveler. The NSA is sponsored by
Student Government Council on
campus.
To provide further information
about the tours a booth will be set
up in the League Wednesday after-
noons.
Cater Will
Speak Here
Douglass Cater, Washington edi-
tor of Reporter magazine, will de-
liver the third of the current
journalism department lectures at
3 p.m. Tuesday in Aud. C, Angell
Hall.
Topic of Cater's speech will be
"A New Look at the Power of the
Press."
Co-author with Marquis W.
Childs of "Ethics in a Business
Society," Cater received his bache-
lor and master of arts degrees in
government from Harvard. He has
been with "The Reporter" since
1948, when it was still in the form-
ative stages.
Washington representative since
1950 of the magazine, Cater
served for a short time on leave
as special assistant to the Secre-
tary of the Army. He also helped
draft Averell Harriman's Mutual
Security Report to Congress.

W isconsin
Students Hit
Security Act
A group of University of Wis-
consin student leaders is prepar-
ing a statement in the Labor
Youth League's appeal of the
Communist-front provisions of the
McCarran Internal Security Act
of 1950 to the Court of Appeals in
Washington, D.C.
A preliminary statement signed
by the group challenges the Act's
constitutionality from "another
viewpoint; its impact on the vast
majority of American youth who
are not members of the Labor
Youth League, who may disagree
with its policies or who may never
even have heard of the Labor
Youth League."
It goes on to say the Act is un-
constitutional because it limits the
rights of students to freely asso-
ciate and freely discuss any con-
troversial issue of the day.
Under the Act, the statement
concludes, "A youth or student
organization calling for desegrega-
tion in education might find itself
before the SACB because the Com-
munists favor desegregation."
An amicus curiae brief is being
prepared, based on the preliminary
statement.
An gulo To Discuss
Velazquez' Works
Diego Angulo Iniguez, professor
of the history of art at the Uni-
versity of Madrid, Spain, will give
a lecture on "Three Masterpieces
of Velazquez" December 6 at 4:10
p.m. in Rackham Amphitheater.
Prof. Angulo is director of the
Institute Diego Velasquez de His-
toria de Arts in Madrid, and is
director of the leading Spanish
art publication, "Archivo Espanol
de Arte."

DAILY
OFFICIAL
13ULLIETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Tickets on sale daily at the offices
of the Musical Society in Burton Tower
until Sat. noon; at the Hill Auditorium
box office one hour preceding each
performance.
Academic Notices
Law School Admission Test: Applica-
tion blanks for the Feb. 18, 1956
administration of the Law School Ad-
mission Test are now available at 110
Rackhan Building.Application blanks
are due in Princeton, N. J. no later
than Feb. 8, 1956.
To Instructors of Engineering Fresh-,
men: Eleven week grades for all En-,
gineering Freshmen are due in the
Secretary's Offipe, 263 West Engineering'
Building on Fri., Dec. 2.
Engineering Seminar: "Personal Prob-
lems after Graduation," discussed by
A. R. Hellwarth of the Detroit Edison
Co. Thurs., Dec. 1, 4:00 p.m., Room 311,
W. Engineering Bldg.
Engineers Interested in Electric Utili-
ties: A. R. Hellwarth of Detroit Edison
speaker for the Engineering Seminar
meeting this week, will be available to
counsel with engineering students inter-
ested in the electric utility industry at
the following times on Thurs., Dec. 1:
10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. in Room 3521
E. Engineering Bldg., and 11:00 a.m. in
Room 229 West Engineering Bldg. Prior
appointment not necessary.
Chemistry Department Colloquium.
Thurs., Dec. 1 at 7:30 p.m. in Room 1300
Chemistry Building. Richard Anderson
will speak on "New Computational Pro-
cedures as Applied to the Electron
Diffraction Investigation of CF3Br,
CF3I, CF3CN and CF3SF5." H. N. Beck
will speak on "Structure of Diazoke-
tones."
Dr. Burdick's Sections of Sociology-
Psychology 62 will not have the exami-
nations scheduled for Thurs. and Fri.
401 Interdisciplinary Seminar on the
Application of Mathematics to Social
Science will meet on Thurs., ,Dec. 1,
Room 3401 Mason Hall from 4:00-5:30

p.m. W. Gardiner will speak on "A
Linear Programming Model for Pro-
duction Decisions."
seminar in Applied Mathematics will
meet Thurs., Dec. 1. 4:00 p.m. in Room
247 West Engineering Building. Prof.
E. F. Masur, Department of Engineering
Mechanics, will speak on "Post-Buckl-
ing Behavior of Plates."
Astronomical Colloquium. Fri., Dec.
2, 4:15 p.m., the Observatory. Dr. Joseph
W. Chamberlain of the Yerkes Observa-
tory will speak on "Auroral Problems."
Doctoral Examination for Robert
Joseph Antonacci, Education; thesis:
"Sports Participation and Interests of
High School Boys in the State of Illi-
nois," Thurs., Dec. 1, East Council
Room, Rackham Bldg., at 3:00 p.m.
Chairman, P. A. Hunsicker.
Applications for Engineering Research
Institute Fellowships to be awarded for
the spring semester 1955-1956 are now
being accepted in the office of the
Graduate School. The stipend is $1,000
per semester. Application forms are
available from the Graduate School.
Only applicants who have been em-
ployed by the Institute for at least
one year on at least a half-time basis
are eligible.
Applications and supporting material
are due in the office of the Graduate
School not later than 4:00 p.m., Fri.,
Jan. 6, 1956.
Applications for Fellowships and
Scholarships in the Graduate School
for 1956-57 are nowavailable.Applica-
tions for renewal should also be filed
at this time. Competition closes Feb.
15, 1955. Blanks and informationmay
be obtained in the Graduate School
Offices, Rackham Building.
Placement Notices
Detroit, Michigan-Southfield Town-
ship Schools-will have a representative
at the Bureau of Appointments on
Wed,. Dec. 7, to interview teachers for
second semester. Teacher Needs: Eng-
lish; Industrial Arts; Elementary Physi-
cal Eduation (woman); Elementary.
Wyandotte, Michigan will have a rep-
resentative at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments on Tues., Dec. 6, to interview
teachers for Second Semester. Teacher
Needs: Elementary; Chemistry - Asst.
Football (man); Girls' Physial Ed.-

High School; Speech Correction--Ele-
mentary; Librarian-Elementary; Visit-
ing Teacher.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Bldg.. NO 3-1511. Ext.
489.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Engrg. School:
Thurs., Dec. 1:
Reed Roller Bit Co., Houston, Texas-
all levels in Mech., Metal., Prod., and
Petrol.
Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem, Pa.--
all levels of all E. except Ae'ro.
Fri., Dec. 2:
Union Oil Company of Calif., Los
Angeles, Calif.-all levels in Chem.,
B.S. and M.S. in Mech. for Research,
Development. Manufacturing and Oil
Field- Production. U.S. citizen.
U.S. Govt., U.S. Patent Office - all
levels in all E. programs, Chemistry, and
Physics. U.S. citizens.
For appointments ocntact the Engrg.
Placement Office, 347 W. Engrg., Ext.
2182.
Representatives from the following
will be at the Bureau of Appointments:
Tues., Dec. 6.
Canada Life Assurance, Jackson, Mich.
(offices in U.S. and Canada)-men for
Sales.
Wed., Dec. 7:
Liberty Mutual Insurance Co., nation-
wide offices - men for Management
Training and Claims Adjustment any-
where in Midwest.
Cadillac Motor Car Div., G.M. Coirp.,
Detroit, Mich.-men in LS&A with some
Accounting background and men in
Mech. E. or Ind. Mgt. for training in
Supervision in Finance Division,
Thurs., Dec. 8:
General Electric Co., Feb. men for
Business Training Program. Should have
aptitude for Accounting.
Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance, De-
troit, Mich.-men for Sales and Man-
agement Training. Offices throughout
U.S.
Michigan Bell 'Telephone Co., Women
in any field for Management Training,
Personnel, Public Contact Work, Writ-
ing, Technical Fields, Teaching,
Fri., Dec. 9:
U.S. Air Force - Women for Officer
Training for positions all over U.S.
and overseas in the WAF.
For appointments contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
Ext. 371.

y

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For solution, see
paragraph below.

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11

HERE'S A DROODLE THAT PACKS A PUNCH. It's titled:
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light up a Lucky? Luckies taste better, first, because
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