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November 22, 1955 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Ti

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Ti

phasizes Forward Look,

Psychiatrist To Combine
Career With Motherhood

4

SIEIEDS

The library itself, which was'
begun in 1922, now has at least
150,000 items. Though it is one of
the most complete transportation
libraries i nthe country, until three
years ago almost no processing had
been done on the stacks of mate-
rial belonging to the Civil Engi-
neering department.
In 1952 the General Library staff
did the physical work in organiz-
ing the material, and one of the
present major interests of the
transportation library is making it
much more usable for the Univer-
sity.
Material from the Transporta-
tion Library is now being used
specifically in all of the highway,
railroad, and transportation cour-
ses in the Department of Civil En-
gineering, in the marketing courses
of the business school, in the eco-
nomics and geography depart-
ments, in architecture courses, and
in the Institute of Public Admin-
istration.
One of the ways in which the
library maintains current interest
is through the many periodicals
and house organs it receives each
month.
Professor Kohl says that the
mutseum aspect of the library can-
not be justified because of an em-
phasis on present and future de-
velopment. Therefore, the many
models and prints that have found
their way into his office have been
unsolicited.
"Empire State 999"
One of the first of these that is
noticed is the model of a locomo-
WATCH REPAIR
4-DAY SERVI(E
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
KAIN JEWELERS
725 N. University (Upstairs)

tive that ran on the old Michigan
Central Railroad, the New York
Central's "Empire State 999."
The model was the gift of Theo-
dore F. N. Zealand, '01E, who built
it ki the University's engineering
shop. In May, 1901, fired with
charcoal, it bran on a circular track
in the attic of the shop.
Zealand later described Prof.
Mortimer Cooley down on his
hands and knees looking at the
parts of the engine as it came
around the track.
Some of the many models in
Prof.kKohl's office include a Stu-
debaker covered wagon donated by
Paul Hoffman, board chairman of
Studebaker a clipper ship with
carved wooden sails, and a boat
used on Dutch canals.
Unusual Requests
Nathanson said he receives un-
usual requests from people want-
ing information on various phases
of transportation.
Last week a man came in who
collected sleighs and wanted to
authenticly paint a recent acqui-
sition. He was given a book on
old sleighs and horse-'drawn ve-
hicles.
Years ago the Fisher Body com-
pany wrote to the library asking
them, "What were the colors of
the wheels of Napoleon's state
coach?"
The Transportation Library,
with its complete collection of old
automobile material, had "stand-
ing room only" when Detroit paper
ran a contest offering prizes for
the identification of old cars.
Indiana "U
Ex-President
Dies at 95
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (A) - Dr.
William Lowe Bryan, ,president
emeritus of Indiana University,
died this afternoon in his home
on the campus..
The 95-year-old educator had
been critically ill 10 days.
Dr. Bryan was president of In-
diana in 1902-37, a period of rapid
academic expansion.
Suffering from high blood pres-
sure, he had been too ill since last
March for strolls on the campus
with which he had been identified
for 75 years.
Dr. Bryan, a lifelong resident of
the Bloomington community, had
remained in the president's home
on the campus as president emeri-
tus since he turned over the presi-
dency to Dr. Herman B. Wells.
Years before he took over the
university administration, he had
gained fame as a young psycholo-
gy professor who demonstrated the
speed of the learning at various
ages in his classic "curve of learn-
ing."

By ERNEST THEODOSSIN
Motherhood and a career are
simultaneously possible according
to Dr. Nanette Dice.
Dr. Dice, a quiet lady who speaks
with an air of calm, is giving up
her psychiatric work for a while
to await the arrival of a child.
Sitting in her office at the
Veterans' Readjustment Center,
Dr. Dice looked very different from
the public conception of a lady
psychiatrist. She was totally un-
impressed with thesuggestion that
there might be some prejudice
against women in her field.
"If there is any," she said, "I've
certainly never encountered it."
Research Teaching
Her duties at present include
research work and teaching, both
of which she enjoys.
She promises that "as long as I
can find someone I trust to take
care of my child," she'll be back at
work in no time.
When she graduated from high
school Dr. Dice enrolled in an art
school for two years. But, as she
explains it, "some things I read
in my senior year of high school
had gotten me interested in psy-
chiatry. So I quit art school."
Got Degrees
Dr. Dicse enrolled in Cleveland's
Western Reserve College and in
three years got her B.A. Then she
went on to Medical school at
Western and got her M.A. in 1949.
"There wasn't any real objec-
tion to my becoming , a psychia-
trist," she said, talking of her fam-
ily. "One brother, however, didn't
approve of it. Not because I was
a woman - but because he just
doesn't approve of the field."
After getting her M.D., Dr. Dice
came to Michigan for internship
and stayed on to become an in-
structor.f
SURPLUS TOO GREAT
Farmers Have
A i _%1--m4"ui 1 -01-

DR. NANETTE DICE
... lady psychiatrist

She still likes her art work. But
she admits that the most she has
time for is making Christmas cards
and occasionally helping create
posters for hospital exhibits.
Most of her energies have been
taken up with a research project
on the drug reserpine, which Dr.
Dice terms "not as much of an
outstanding success as some pub-
lications have claimed it is." The
drug has been used to calm mental
patients.
Her husband, who works in the
same field, is employed at the
Michigan Institute State Agency
for Children. Dr. Rice said she
feels that "having a child and
bringing it up" will be an invalu-
able experience for both her and
her husband.
"It should increase our under-
standing of children and be a
real help in our future work."
Their Doubts
Price Supports

MICHIGAN DAILY,
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Benrus Embraceable watch. In
or around Football Stadium Nov. 19.
REWARD. NOrandy 2-0510 after 5:30.
)80A
LOST-Brown tweed topcoat. Nov.)12.
Reward. Call NO 3-2001. )82A
LOST-Psychological Research data in
vicinity of Washington & 5th Ave.
Phone NO 3-2150, no questions asked.
)81A
SILVER CROSS, from Etheopia, with
hinge. Lost between Pretzel Bell and
5th Ave. parking lot Friday evening,
7:00 Reward. NO 3-0482. )79A
LOST-Aristo slide rule with cloth case
bearing my name on eve of Nov. 15.
Between East Engineering and Mich-
igan Union. Finder may please con-
tact Chart, 518 South Division. )A
FOR SALE
15" Jensen Co-Axial Speaker in Modern
Folded-Horn Enclosure. $110. Ross
Smith, NO 3-0190.
LIVE CHAMELONS, Angel Fish, Clown-
Loaches, Leaf Fish, Ghost Shrimp, and
Guppies. University Aquarium, NO
3-0224, )77B
FIRE PLACE LOGS, Seasoned hard-
woods. $12.00 per cord delivered. N. J.
Coury, Saline, Mich. Call 581-R eve-
nings. )74B
MEISSNER FMAM Hi-Fi tuner and am-
plifier; webster Chicago 3-speed
changer, G.E. V. R. Cartage; G.E.
Speaker $175. Phone NO 3-2249. )B-54
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88: Sox,
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )4B
STUDENT ROOM
RUG SP~ECIAL
9x12 cottons, all colors, priced
on sale now at $29.95
SMITH'S CARPET STORE
207 E. Washington NO 3-5536
COOKED and cleaned select cocktail
shrimp for the party, get-togethers at
Washington Fish Market. 208 E. Wash-
ington, NO 2-2589. Free delivery. )3B
USED CARS
1947 DODGE FOUR DOOR. Good trans-
portation. $95.00. f )79N
1953 CHEVROLET Hard-top. 20,000
miles, radio, heater, Power Glide -
SHARP. $1,045.00. )78N
1952 BUICK convertible, white wall
tires, Radio, heater, Dynaf low, Red
Finish, power windows, very clean.
$945.00. )77N
1955 PLYMOUTH almost brand new, 5,-
000 miles, $1300 cash or $200 down
payment and installments. Call Sam.
Afternoons. NO 3-5156. )76N

USED CARS
'35 FORD rebuilt motor. R&H and Spot.
$60. Call NO 3-8134 evenings. )80N
TRANSPORTATION SPECIALS - 1951
Hillman Convertible $395; 1951 Henry
J. $295; Both cars exc. cond. 25-35 mi.
per gal. Sport Cars-Ypsilanti. )73N
1950 FORD V-8 2-door in excellent
shape. $395. University Oldsmobile. 907
N. Main, NO 3-0507. )72N
1946 MERCURY convertible. $75. Uni-
versity Oldsmobile, 907 N. Main. NO
3-0507. )71N
47 HUDSON. Excellent shape. Best of-
fer. NO 2-2078. )44N
1940 PLYMOUTH Sedan excellent con-
dition. 1949 Mercury Sedan Al-$295.
"You get a better deal" at Fitzgerald-
Jordan, Inc. 607 Detroit Street, NO 8-
8141. )68N
1952 STUDEBAKER Commander V-8, 4
door, radio, heater and overdrive.
1950 Studebaker Champion 2 door,
very good condition.
ARCURE MOTOR SALES
617 Detroit St. NO 3-3309
)66N
1952 CHEVROLET 2-Door-27,000 Miles.
Radio, heater, white-walls. Call NO
2-6429 after 6. )60N
'47 OLDSMOBILE four door 76 radio,
heater. Very sharp, $145.00, Univers-
ity Oldsmobile 907 No. Main St. NO
3-0507. )56
'47 PONTIAC Club Coupe radio, heater,
excellent shape one owner $145. Uni-
versity Oldsmobile 907 N. Main St.
NO 3-0507 or NO 2-9626. )57
1949 FORD Tudor, six-cylinder, good
condition, 90 W. Joy Rd. Call NO
2-2664. )25N
'49 OLDS, Super 8a, cream convertible.
Red leather seats, hydramatic, ra-
dio, heater, new top, white walls.
$350. Call after 8:30, NO 3-1279. )19N
BUSINESS SERVICES
A GRADUATE of "La Sorbonne"--Doc-
tor's degree-would like to give spe-
cial lessons in French: Call NO 2-
9800 evenings. )23J
TYPING - Manuscripts, Thesis, Disser-
tations, etc. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Phone NO 2-5336. )18J
TYPING - Thesis, Term papers, c4c.
Reasonable rates, prompt service. 830
South Main, NO 8-7590..)5
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Wtkels Arcade.
)4J
WASHINGS-Alho ironings privately.
Specializing in cotton dresses.) Free
pick up and delivery. Phone N'O 2-
9020. )9J
RICHARD MADDY-VIOLINMAKER
Fine, old certified instruments &
bows. 310 8. State. NO 2-5962. )2J
SERVICE SHOP, 1217 S.A. Studio. 1317
S. Univ. )1J
HI-FI Components and Service Audio-
phle, net prices. Telefunken Hi-F,
AM-FM shortwave radios. Service on
all makes of radios and phonogrphs.
Ann Arbor Radio and TV. 120 S.
University. Phone NO 8-7942. 1%
blocks east of East Eng. )lJ

10%

rat gh
(Author of "Barefoot Boy With Cheek," etc.)

HOW TO BE A BMOC

Any man who wishes to be a BMOC-you show me one who
doesn't and I'll show you a misspent youth-will do well to fol.
low the few simple rules listed below.
The first requisite of a BMOC is, of course, a letter in athletics.
This presents no great problem to the big, the strong, and the
hulking. But what do you do if you are a puny little chap with
a concave chest and muscles like tallow?
I'll tell you what you do: You go to the nearest letter store,
buy a letter, sew it on your sweater, and wear it.
This, perhaps, is not
strictly ethical, but chances
are slim that anybody will
question you about it. If
someone should, you have a
perfectly logical explana-
tion. Simply say, "That 'I'
on, my sweater does not
< stand for 'Iowa.' It stands
for 'Infirm.'"... Or, "That
'P' does not stand for
'Princeton.' It stands for
'Poorly.'". . . Or,."That
'W&L' does not stand for
'Washington and Lee.' It
't~jrnt47ed 'zoke? stands for 'Withered and
' Lumpy."'. . . Or, "That
'BG' does not stand for 'Bowling Green.' It stands for 'Badly
Gangrenous'
So, you see, getting the letter-sweater is no large task. But that
is only a part of BMOC-hood. Another, and equally important,
part is to join the right fraternity. Let me emphasize-the right
fraternity. Joining the wrong fraternity is worse than joining
no fraternity at all.
How can you be sure that the fraternity you join is the right
one? Very simply. Just ask the rushing chairman. After all,
why should he lie to you?
Once the BMOC is estab-
lished in the right frater-
nity, the next step is to get
the right girl. A BMOC's
girl mustnbe beautiful,
scription are admittedly note
easy to find. If you should
discover that all the suitable
girls on your campus are
already attached, do not
despair. There are several
things you can do.
You can, for example, cut
your throat.
Or you can pick one of
the less attractive ladies on
campus, veil her, dress her
in houri pants, and tell
everybody she is an ex-
change student from Istan- InnnsfaeN.
bul. (A fellow I knew in m sofC1,S
school - Hardtack Sigafoos
by name - did just that. After several semesters he discovered
to his surprise that he loved the girl. Today they are happily
married and run one of the biggest Turkish baths in Ida
Grove, Iowa.)
We arrive now at the question: What does a BMOC smoke?
And the answer is-new Philip Morris, of corris!
Anvbodv-hiz man on camus nr little man. hig woman or

lIoutr Fl5exile
WASHINGTON (M)-A belief is
growing among farmers that flex-
ible price supports-the feature of
the Eisenhower administration
farm program-will fail to ac-
complish their goal under the pres-
ent handicap of huge surpluses.
The goal is to fit output to de-
mand-to avoid both surpluses and
shortages.
Under the flexible system, gov-
ernment price guarantees vary in
relation to supplies. In times of
surpluses, price supports are low-
ered with the idea of discourag-
ing overproduction.
,Likewise, in times of shortages,
supports would be raised to pro-
vide an incentive for increased
production.
Rigid Floors
Preceding the flexible supports
was a system of rigid price floors
established early in World War II
to encourage greater production
for military needs.
Many farmers who testified at
recent hearings held in major
farming area' by the Senate Ag-
ricultural Committee-as well as
many interviewed on the side-
said they did not believe flexible
supports will work at present in
view of record surpluses.
Among those taking this view
were many who favored the legis-
lation establishing the flexible
plan and who still want It kept
in force for the long pull.
Many said they felt the variable
supports would work if they could
be started when there was a bal-
ance between supplies and market
needs.
TPWU11na s Citn

. ..

DIAL NO 2-2513
Playing Through Wednesday
Science-Fiction
Thrills!!

which producers of the surplus
crop can switch.
But at present there are no such
alternative products; there is a
surplus, or at least an ample sup-
ply, of all farm commodities.
The flexible program was not
put into effect on a broad scale
until this year, except for dairy
products. Flexible supports for the
latter went into operation early in
1954.
Nevertheless, there has been
flexibility, mostly downward, in
prices of most farm products for
the past four years, whether or
not they were subject to supports.
It is on the basis of experience
with this general decline as well
as reduced supports this year that
many farmers have concluded the
new plan will not be effective un-
der present conditions.
Production Goes Up
Farmers cited the fact that de-
spite the downturn in prices and
in price guarantees, production has
gone up instead of.r down. This
year's production will be the larg-
est on record.
Faced with fixed production
costs-and in many cases by in-
terest charges and payments due
on mortgage debts-many farmers
planted more land to crops, rather
than less, in an effort to increase
volume.
In addition, many turned to in-
tensified production - including
heavier use of fertilizer-to step
up their output to offset lower
prices.
Grinnell Award
Frank Poretta, '52SM, of Detroit
has received the $2,500 Grinnell
Scholarship Award.

MISSILE AND CONTROL EQUIPMENT DEPARTMENTS " NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION " DOWNEY, CALIFORNIA

l

Producersa wi en
For effective operation, the flex-
ible system. presupposes that when
a surplus develops in one com-
modity there will be other products
not available in oversupply to

II £1

StARRING rJOHN AGAR .:::"
MARA CORDAY
LEO G.CARROLL
Shown at 2:20 - 5:00 - 7:40 -
10 P.M.
" PLUSe
s *9
Shown at 1:00 - 3:35 - 6:15 -
9:10 P.M.

ENGINEERS,
SCIENTISTS,9
PHYSICISTS,
MATHEMATICIANS
important on-campus
interviews soon!
North American Missile and Control Departments
Representative Will Be Here Nov. 30, Dec. 1.
You'll learn first hand about the advantages
and opportunities in choosing a career with a
future at North American. Here engineers
and scientists are now discovering new
frontiers in four exciting new fields:

Ic

CHEKHOV'S
"THE SEAGULL"

FINAL WEEK

Wednesday through Saturday
8:15 P.M.

Admission $1.65

Students 99e

MASONIC TEMPLE
327 So. Fourth Ave. Tel. NO 2-5915
Box office open daily 10-5

r

The 36th MICHIGAN UNION OPERA

ELECTRO-MECHANICAL
Missile Guidance Systems
Fire and Flight Control Systems
Computers, Recorders
ROCKET PROPULSION
High Thrust Engines
Propellants
Pumps

SUPERSONIC AIRFRAMES
Structures
Thermal Barriers
Vibrations and Flutter
NUCLEAR ENGINEERING
Research Reactors
Medical Reactors
Power Generation Reactors

proudlyj
presents 'FILM FLAM"
MICHIGAN THEATRE .. Dec. 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th
nIFC OL e- eln TirfVETC nMLI V

i

I

~,.. ..~ )

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