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November 20, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEMRER 20, 1955

Whips
- --

Marquette;

.Prepares

for

Rose

Bowl

Kowalczyk
Leads State
In 330 Win
Morrall Passes

NOTES IN THE MARGIN
. . by alan eisenberg
Daily Associate Sports Editor

FJrorr First ncore
EAST LANSING (P)-Michigan
State whipped Marquette, 33-0, at
Macklm Stadium yesterday and
then erupted into a happy hys-
teria of celebration over the word
that Ohio State had downed Mi-
chigan to send the MSU Spartans
to the Rose Bowl.
Obviously jittery over the out-
come of the decisive Big Ten game
at Ann Arbor, Mich., "65 miles
southeast of here, the Spartans got
off to a slow start.
Michigan State only led 6-0 at
the half but, apparently goaded
by Coach Duffy Daugherty's "keep
your minds on the game" dressing
room spiel at the half, the Spar-
tans came charging back for two
touchdowns in the third and two
more in the final period.
News Brings Screams
The crowd of 41,814 had portable
radios spotted through the stands.
At times the game on the field had
to be stopped because of the noise
of the crowd screaming over favor-
able developments of the Ohio
State-Michigan game.
State went to the Rose Bowl in
1953 and is the first Big Ten team
to make the Pasadena trip twice
in three years.
Backs Score
Dave Kaiser made the first-
period State touchdown on a 41-
yard pass from quarterback Earl
Morrall. Walt Kowalczyk's five-
yard end-around and a one-yard
line buck by Jerry Planutis ac-
counted for the scoring in the third
period surge.
John Lewis, who had two touch-
downs called back by penalties,
ran 16 yards around end for one
final period score and Dennis Men-
dyk made the other from two
.and tore down the goal posts-
yards out.
The happy crowd mobbed the
team on the field at the finish and
tore down the goal posts-before
the game ended-in a mad cele-
bration.
Michigan State . . . 6 0 13 14-33
Marquette . . .. 0 0 0 0- 0

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
FRANK ELLWOOD, OSU quarterback, attempting a 4th down touchdown pass on Michigan's five-yard line. The pile-up in the
line. was typical of the rough line play throughout the game. Ellwood was hit and the ball slipped from his hand to be recovered on
the eight-yard line by Michigan end Tom Maentz, thwarting another Ohio drive.

CINCH BOWL BIDS

Olahoma, Maryland, TCU Blank Conference Foes

l _

W

By The Associated Press
LINCOLN, Neb. - Oklahoma's
mighty Sooners buried the title
hopes of Nebraska's fired-up Porn-
huskers under a relentless ava-
1.r.t hd t.T.aI..Anhr.,. .,nrcar~vdr

vaunted speed and depth to make
it a second-half runaway.
For Coach Bud Wilkinson's na-
tionally top-ranked Sooners, it ran
the country's longest current win
streak to 28 games.

,/'oiw as4SW7Ze U

I

iancne o f oucnaowns yester ay
for a 41 to 0 triumph and the 10th* *
Big Seven Conference football title Texas Christian 35, Rice 0
FORT WORTH, Tex. - Texas
for Oklahoma in 10 campaigns. Christian toyed with Rice for a
Although slowed at the outset 35-0 victory, and moved into the
by fumbles and drive-checking Cotton.Bowl as host team Jan. 2.
penalties, Oklahoma racked-up a Chuck Curtis' passing and the
13-0 halftime lead and drew on its running of Ray Taylor and Vernon

I

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tnen! 4Ytd 6 Timell ij 't 9oiu Ifra!
A GENUINE FUR-FELT HAT
with the purchase of a
SUIT or TOPCOAT

Hallbeck administered the worst
defeat in 34 years of football com-
petition with the Owls.
As the game ended, the con-
ference announced it had passed
a rule that would give the Cotton
Bowl spot to some team other
than Texas A&M even if the latter
wins the conference championship.
A&M is ineligible for the Bowl
game because it is on probation
for violating the recruiting rules.
Under the conference ruling, the
second place team gets the Cotton
Bowl place and TCU, in insuring
itself of a tie for second, automati-
cally advanced to the Bowl game
because it beat the only team able
to tie it for second-Texas.
* 4I
Maryland 19, Geo. Washington 0
COLLEGE PARK, Md. - Half-
back Ed Vereb scored two first half
touchdowns behind a second string
line and Maryland fought off
George Washington throughout
the scoreless second half for a 19-
0 victory to head for the Orange
Bowl with its third undefeated
team in five years.
Vereb thus hiked his season's
touchdown total to 16 in 10 games.
Lynn Beightol quarterbacked
the first string in place of Frank
KEEP A-HEAD
OF YOUR HAIR??
Try us for:
" Personnel & Sanitation
* Workmanship & Service
* 11 Barbers-No Wciting
The Dascola Barberi
near Michigan Theater

Tamburello, who operated the re-
serves with a heavily bandaged
neck.
Coach Jim Tatum gave his sec-
ond string-working with Vereb-
the ball when it recovered a fumble
on the GW 26 later in the period.
Vereb, on four carries, covered 22
yards, plunging over the final
yard.

BEN Oosterbaan held court in his usual corner of the Michigan
dressing room after yesterday's game. One could hardly'tell that
he had suffered one of the bitterest defeats of his career. His hat
was cocked at the usual angle, he wore an unperturable smile, his
manner was calm, his voice gentle.
He took the loss like a gentleman. The Michigan coach answered
all the questions in a pleasant manner, never was he curt.
"It's the nature of the game," he said. "You have joys and sor-
rows. I have had my share of both-and I can expect the same in
the future. Some have to win and some have to lose."
The dressing room emptied quickly. The players. dressed and
left as soon as they could. There was only the sound of water in the
shower room. Tony Branoff tried to escape from a half-drunken
well-wisher. The assistant coaches huddled together and talked in
muffled tones.
There was almost awe in Ooos-
terbaan's voice when he talked
about the Ohio State team. "They
were a great team," he drawled.
"They dominated play throughout
-they were sharp on offense and
defense. Their' line was always
beating us to the punch."
Oosterbaan had only the great-
t est praise for Hopalong Cassady.
The Buckeye halfback put on a
brilliant show before the shivering
crowd as he gained 146 yards in
28 carries and scored one touch-
down.
"Every adjective that has been
used to describe Cassady applies,"
Michigan's coach noted wryly. A
hint of a smile came over his face
and he said: "And you can throw
in a few more. Just a tremendous
player."
He spoke little about the Michi-
gan team, itself. The Wolverine
BEN OOSTERBAAN mentor observed that our "defense
just wasn't good enough. There
was nobody outstanding for us." Oosterbaan concluded with congratu-
lations to Ohio State for winning the Big Ten championship. And
about the Spartans: "Congratulations, too, to Michigan State. They
will be a fine representative. There's not much else to say . .:
It was a little different on the other side of the tunnel. The Ohio
State dressing room was a cheering, yelling group of players, coaches,
and friends.
Woody Reigs Supreme...
But it was Woody Hayes who ,reigned supreme. Seated half-
dressed before an open locker, the heavy-set, curly haired coach was
screaming almost hysterically. Over and over again he roared:
"My boys were the greatest . . . my boys were the greatest."
Suddenly, at the peak of hysteria, University president, Harlan
Hatcher and his young son walked into the din. Hayes spoke to
Hatcher for a moment, then leaped up, ran to the center of the room,
and shouted for quiet. He yelled to Cassady who wa singing in the
shower: "Hloppy, Hoppy, come here."
"Boys," the Buckeye coach said, "this is Doctor Hatcher, Michigan
president, who used to be head of our English department." Then
Hayes turned to Hatcher and said, "Prexy, tell them the same thing
you just told me."
In a low and refined voice, President Hatcher praised the Ohio
State team. He called them "the finest team to play in the Michigan
Stadium this year."
A voice in the background shouted, "How about for all time?" A
roar of laughter shuttled through the room. Hatcher grinned broadly,
,shook hands with Hayes, turned and quietly left. Hysteria reigned
again.
Praise from Hayes...
Above the noise Hayes talked about the game. The Buckeye
leader praised his line quite highly. "I've never seen them play like
that. I wouldn't have bet a thousand to one on this one coming out
like it did. Did you ever see anything like it?"
Hayes was correct; on very few occasions have teams put on a
performance as Ohio State did. The Buckeyes met a good Michigan
team and walked all over thei. The Ohio line was aggressive and
hard hitting, their backs shifty and hard to tackle. The winners
made 20 first downs-15 more than the Maize and Blue.
The visitors rolled up all but four of their 337 yards on the
ground. Michigan, on the other hand, could garner only a meagre
109 yards. Branoff was the Wolverines' "big" man with 37 yards in
nine carries.
There was still noise and confusion in the Buckeye dressing
room when I walked out into the cold evening air. Almost, everything
was summed up with the song the' Ohio State players were singing:
"We don't give a damn for the whole-state of Michigan, for the whole
state of Michigan... ."
And that's just the way they played yesterday.
Read and Use Daily Classifieds

Michigan State to Meet UCLA
In 1956 Rose Bowl Classic

4 1,

By The Associated Press
It's UCLA and Michigan State
in the Rose Bowl.
The powerful Uclans swept to
a 17-7 victory over Southern Cali-
fornia yesterday to wrap up the
Pacific Coast Conference title and
earn themselves the host spot in
the Jan. 2 glamour game at Pasa-
dena, Calif.
Michigan State received its need-
ed help from Ohio State. The
Buckeyes walloped Michigan, 17-0,
and thus slammed the door in the
Wolverine faces.
'M' Loss Sends State
State, which finished its Big
Ten schedule last week, showed a
5=1 mark. The Wolverines, who
would have gone to the Rose Bowl
with a victory over Ohio State,
finished with 5-2.
The Spartans will become the
first Big Ten team to make the
Pasadena trip twice in three years
and the second team to represent
the conference without winning
the title.
The Spartans finished in a first

Must a good
appearance
cost a fortune?
Definitely not. Careful choice
where you are sure of the level
of quality counts more than
money. We are proud of the
fact that so many of the best-
dressed men in town choose
almost everything they wear
from our selectionsl
SUITS ............
TOPCOATS .......
SPORT COATS ....

place tie with Illinois in 1953 and
were elected as the conference
representative for the Jan. 1, 1954,
game. Michigan State beat UCLA,
28-20, with a stirring second half
rally.
The only other team to finish
second and represent the Big Ten
in the Rose Bowl was Northwest-
ern. The Wildcats finished second
to Michigan in 1948 and went on
to beat California, 20-14.
Michigan State finished the sea-
son with an 8-1 record-best in the
Big Ten-losing only to Michigan,
14-7.
One Loss by Big Ten
Since the Big Ten-Pacific Coast
pact started Jan. 1, 1947, the Big
Ten has won every game with the
exception of Wisconsin's 7-0 loss
to Southern Cal in 1953.
Ohio State, which won the Big
Ten title by whipping Michigan, is
ineligible for the bowl because of
the rule against repeaters.
The Buckeyes whipped Southern
Cal, 20-7, last New Year's Day.
Texas Christian clinched the
host spot in the Cotton Bowl by
walloping Rice, 35-0. The other,
Cotton Bowl team is not invited
yet and officials probably will
name it after next week's Army-
Navy game.

4 .

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Best.

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Conversation pieces.
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Waste Basket $295
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A SELECTION OF THE BEST SELLERS
GENERAL

LINDBERGH --GIFT FROM THE SEA ...........
CARSON - THE EDGE OF THE SEA .............
POST - ETIQUETTE.......................
SCHINDLER - HOW TO LIVE 365 DAYS A YEAR .
MEMOIRS BY HARRY TRUMAN VOL. 1........

..........".$2.75
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............ 3.95
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FICTION

KANTOR - ANDERSONVILLE ...................
COSTAIN - THE TONTINE 2 VOLS. ............
SAGAN - BONJOUR TRISTESSE .................
HAWLEY -CASH McCALL ....................
ASCH - THE PROPHET ..... .................. .

"........$5.00
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"....._

11

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VAG cFT.Ff Tbt)Q dIV CHRISTMAS CARDS~

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