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November 16, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

SIX

N lEMChGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1955

THE MhORNING AFTER-
Drinking DICk Dashaw ayDramatized
By AL STILWAGON
"Curse that last night's frolic,
I shan't get over it this week. I :..y,..
am as stupid and thirsty as if, I
had not slept nor drank these two *
days.
The language may be a bit flow-
ery, but that "morning after" feel-
ing is as much with us in 1955 as.:
it was in 1809.
'Our Hero'
Our hero, Dick Dashaway, feat- .
ured on Sunday's University "TV-
Hour," is strikingly familiar as:
he laments last night's "adoration
at the shrines of Bacchus and Ve-
ius." Dick was the first of this
nation's stereotyped college stu-
dents. He was presented to the
public in 1809 by his creator, A.: :
E. Lindsley.
Fashionably rising no sooner.
than ten, preparing for an eve-
ning's entertainment at the gam-
ing- tables with the aid of a half-
dozen juleps, Dashaway laid the
foundation of one of our most
cherished customs: solving the
world's problems in the local cof-
fee houses. :

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
The Monarch Machine Tool Co., Sid-
ney, Ohio-B.S. in Metal. E; B.S. and
M.S. in Elect., Indust., Instrum., and
Mechanics; all levels in Mech. E. for
Devel., Design, and Production.
City of Cincinnati, Civil Service Com-
mission, Cincinnati, Ohio-B.S. in Civil,
Elect., and Mech. E. for Design and
Construction. U.S. citizen.
General Dynamics Corp., Electric Boat,
Groton, Conn.-all levels in Civil, Con-
struction,. Elect., Indust., Instru.,
Materials, Math., Mech., Metal., Naval
and Marine, Nuclear, Engrg. Mech., Phy-
sics and Science for Research, Devel.,
Design, Prod., and Constr. Must be
U.S. citizen.
Mott Foundation, Flint Board of
Educ., Flint, Mlch.-all levels in all
Engrg. programs, Physics, or Math. for
teaching and organizing Electronics
Dept. for the Flint Board of Educ., in
Flint Jr. College and Mott Found. Adult
Educ. Program.
Jack & Heintz, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio-
all levels in Aero., Elect., Ind., Mech.,
Metal., Engrg. Mechanics for Research,
Devel., Design, Production, Sales, Pur-
chasing, Accounting, and Treasury,
Tues., Nov. 29:
Buhr Machine Tool Co., Ann Arbor,
Mich.-all levels in Elect., Ind., Material,
Math., Mech., Engrg. Mech., and Metal
for Design. U.S. citizen.
Republic Aviation Corp., Airframe and
Guided Missiles, Farmingdale, N. Y.-
all levels in Aero., Chem., Civil., Elect.,
Ind., Instru., Math., ° Mech., Metal.,
Nuclear, and Physics for Research, De-
vel., Design, and Prod. Must be U.S.
citizen.
Commonwealth Edison Co., Chicago,
Ili.-B.S. and M.S. in Elect., Mech. for
Research, Devel., Design, Prod., and
Constr. U.S. citizen.
United Aircraft Corp., Research Dept.,
East Hartford, Conn.-all levels in Aero.,
Chem., Elect., Instru., and Mech. for
Research and Design. Must be U.S.
citizen.
ColuMbia-Southern Chem. Corp. (sub-

sidiary of Pitt. Plate Glass), Barberton, For appointments contact the Engrg. Mich.-men in any field for Manage- Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Mich.--
Ohio-all levels in Chem., Civil, Con- Placement Office, 347 West. Engrg., ment Training Program for positions men for Sales. Must have had a course
stru., Elect., Ind., Instru., Mech. for Ext. 2182. anywhere in Michigan. or more in Chem. or the Physical
Research, Development, Design, Prod., Western Electric Co., manufacturers Sciences. Positions are in various loca-
Constru., and Sales. Representatives from the following and suppliers of tools for telephone tions in the U.S.
Penick & Ford, Ltd., Inc., Cedar Rap- will be at the Bureau of Appointments: service, offices in East and Midwest- For appointments contact the Bureau
ids, Iowa-all Engrg. seniors interested Mon. and Tues., Nov. 21 and 22: men for Management Training Program. of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
for Sales. Michigan Bell Telephone Co., Detroit, Tues., Nov. 22: Ext. 371.

What young people are doing at Genera

'Love and Friendship'
Dick appears as the mainstay of
"Love and Friendship," one of
four native dramas being present-
ed at 10 a.m. Sunday, on. WWJ-
TV on "A Land to Be Free," the
American history series produced
by the University Television Of-
fice in conjunction with Clements
Library. Prof. Howard Peckham,
library director and host for the
series, and Prof. Jack Bender of
the speech department will intro-
duce each scene asa part of the
story of the development of early
American theater.
The Clements Library has an
extensive collection of dramatic
work written by Americans or re-
printed in America, since the cre-
ative spirit so evident after the
revolution found its best expres-
sion through playwriting.
By 1830 there had been at least
350 plays written by Americans.
"A Company of Players," the
fifth in the "Land to Be Free"
series, will feature .cuttings from
three other early American pro-
ductions: "Clari" by John Howard
Opera Scripts
Union Opera Scripts for 1956
are now being accepted. For fur-
ther information; -call NO .2-4431.

COLLEGE LIFE, 1809-A PATERNAL LECTURE ON THE EVILS
OF DRINK--DOES HISTORYREPEAT ITSELF?

Payne; "Andre" by William Dun-i
lap; and "The Indian Princess"
by James Barker.
These three, along with "Love
and Friendship," forcefully illus-
trate the change in American
theatrical taste since revolution-
ary times.
Next week, "A Company of

Players" will bring to the screen a
half hour production of Royall Ty-
ler's comedy: "The Contrast."
"Contrast" is the first American
comedy produced successfully by
a professional company.

Young engineer
decides What colors
are best for
G-E reflector lamps
Which color of light makes people look nat-
ural? Should a blue light be used more often
than a red? What kind of effect does a violet
light have on merchandise?
In recent years, color lighting has become
so important in stores, restaurants, theaters,
and displays that General Electric developed
a line of new easy-to-use color-reflector lamps
for this market.
The man responsible for .deciding which
colors are most effective for users of these
lamps is 29-year-old Charles N. Clark, Ap-
plication Engineering Color Specialist for
General Electric's large lamp department.
Clark's Work Is Interesting, Important
In a recent series of tests, Clark made a
critical appraisal of literally hundreds of
color-filter materials to find the ones that
produced maximum results but were still
suitatle to high-production techniques, prac-
tical stocking and simplified selling. This
experimental work also had to take into
account all the information on human per-
ception of color.
25,000 College Graduates at General Electric
When Clark came to General Electric in
1949, he already knew the work he wanted
to do. Like each of the 25,000 college-grad-
uate employees, he was given his chance to
grow and realize his full potential. For Gen-
eral Electric has long believed this: When
fresh, young minds are given freedom to
make progress, everybody benefits-the in-
dividual, the company, and the country.

I

LAST ON THE BALLOT
SY ZIEGELMAN
for S.G.C.
FIRST IN CALIBER

for the
special attention
of
ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERS
AND
PHYSICISTS

I

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t

7

Dave Johnson asks:

HUGH Es

i

_\

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT LABORATORIES
Culver City, Los Angeles County, California

,"

Read GARGOYLE
and grow legs!
\
BEFORE AFTER
on sale soon!

What's involved
in production
work at
Du Pont?

1V[-'Xf=M=== 11

HUGHES ANNOUNCES IN.V V =I"=
OPENINGS ON ITS STAFFS MEMBERS OF T
FOR THOSE RECEIVING STAFF WILL CO
B.S.. M.S. OR PH.D. INTERVIEWS O
DEGREES DURING THE CONSULT YOUR
COMING YEAR. OFFICE NOW FC
OPENINGS ARE IN THESE FIELDS:
for work in

HE HUGHES ENGINEERING
NDUCT PERSONAL
N YOUR CAMPUS.
R SCHOOL PLACEMENT
OR APPOINTMENT.

I

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
Airborne Radar Systems, Servomechanisms, Computers,
Systems Analysis, Guided Missile Systems,
Automatic Controls, Physical Analysis, Microwave Tubes,
Pulse Circuitry, Information Theory, Ground Radar Systems,
Solid-State Physics, Transistors, Test Equipment Design,
Miniaturization, Electromechanical Design, Gyros,
Hydraulics, Subminiaturization, Mechanical Design,
Instrumentation, Telemetering, Antennas, Wave Guides.

DAVID L. JOHNSON, JR., expects to receive his B.S.Ch.E.
from the University of Kansas in 1956. He is very active in
campus affairs, president of Alpha Chi Sigma and a member of
several honorary engineering fraternities. Dave is interested in
learning more about production work in the chemical industry.

44

for work in
OTHER AREAS
Technical Writing, Missile Field Engineering,
Engineering Administration, Radar & Missile Instruction,
Radar Field Engineering, Patent Law.

Jim Hamilton answers:

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JAMES L. HAMILTON is one of the many young
engineers who have been employed by Du Pont
since the end of the war. After service in the
Navy, Jim got his B.S.Ch.E. from the University
of West Virginia in June 1948, and immediately
joined Du Pont's Repauno Plant at Gibbstown,
N. J. Today, he is Assistant Superintendent of
the dimethyl terephthalate area at this plant.

S.G.C. ELECTION RESULTS TONIGHT

Well, Dave, I've been doing production work at Du Pont
for about seven years now, and I'm still getting in-
volved in new things. That's what makes the work so
interesting-new and challenging problems arise all
the time.
To generalize, though, the duties are largely admin-
istrative. That's why effectiveness in working with
others is one of the prime requirements. Teamwork is
important in research and development work, for sure.
But it's even more important in production, because
you work each day with people having widely differ-
ent skills and backgrounds.
A production supervisor needs a good understanding
of engineering and scientific principles, too. He has to
have that to get the best results from complicated

4

on WHRV (1600 on your dial)

A MORE COMPLETE ANSWER to Dave John-
son's question about production work is
given in "The Du Pont Company and the
College Graduate." This booklet describes in
detailt-h iimm nonortunities and responsi-

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