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November 15, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 151955

INION OPERA LINEUP:
Taylor Men Wait Overnight for Tickets

Ice Age Leaves Rock
Reminders on Campus

By VERNON NAHRGANG,
Seventeen men took turns wait-
ing in line almost 24 hours so
South Quad houses would befirst
to buy 446 Union Opera tickets
yesterday morning.
Working from one- to three-
hour shifts, Taylor House men
began their vigil at 9:45 a.m. Sun-
day in front of the ticket office
in the Union. They kept their
place in line until the office opened
at 8 a.m. yesterday.
When the office did open, there
was a long line waiting to pur-

chase housing group blocks for
the performances. In addition to
the South Quadders, members
from two fraternities waited in
line overnight.
Taylor House originated the
idea in order to insure their get-
ting seats for the Friday, Dec. 9
performance.
This will give Taylorites, and
other South Quadders, a big week-
end that includes the . annual
South Quad Christmas dance,
Noel Moderne, Dec. 10.
Taylor House President Marsh-

all P. Badt, '57Ph., and Business
Manager John A. Katherler, '58,
organized the coup and served the
last shift in order to be on hand
with their order for 95 tickets.
Although the line was short and
composed of South Quad residents
Sunday, it began to grow later
that night.
A little friendly rivalry prevail-
ed when one of the fraternity
representatives challenged the
quadders to a poker game with
first place in line as stakes. The
challenge was refused.
Empty Coke and candy mach-
ines didn't help the spirits of the
Collegel
By TED FRIEDMAN
A verbal war has broken out
between the University of Wash-
ington Daily and the Chewelah
(Washington) Independent over
loyalty oaths.
The Chewelah weekly has called
for the dismissal of two Washing-
ton professors who are contesting
the legality of the oaths, while
the university daily insists that
"they are American citizens try-
ing to protect the rights guaran-
teed them under the Constitution.
T h e Chewelah Independent
warns the university that come
1957, their budget may be slashed
"if that is the type of student-
thinkers we are spewing at our
University." It denounces the
professors as "rotten apples on
the faculty who leave a sour taste
in the mouths of the taxpayers
who dig up their salaries."
The daily answers that the pro-
fessors' effort "is to preserve, not
subvert, the republic's foundations.
Not that we want Communists on
this or any other faculty. By
adopting the Marxist closed sys-
tem of thought, a Communist
places himself outside the com-
munity of scholars." The edi-
torial ends by saying, "For not
creating 'student-thinkers' in its
own image, (The Chewelah Inde-
pendent) would cut off the Uni-
versity at the pocketbook."
"Wealthy people probably have
just as much chance of being exe-
cuted for murder as people with-
out means," Dr. Rollin M. Perkins

-Daily=Dick Gaskill
LONG WAIT PAYS OFF-Taylor House is first in line as ticket
sales open for this year's Union Opera, "Film Flam."

Free School
For Exiles
I 5thX ear
A unique university is marking
its fifth anniversary this fall with
the enrollment of 200 escapees
from behind the Iron Curtain.
The Free Europe University in
Exile, founded in 1951 by a group
of private American citizens, pro-
vides education for scholastically
qualified refugees.
Through contributions f r o m
America, the university is able to
send approximately 200 students
each year to universities all across
western Europe-from London to
Paris, from Geneva to Istanbul.
Here the students continue their
previously interrupted schooling
and prepare for a life in the free
world.
Every year a seminar is held with
students from Europe, South
America and the United States.
This year's seminar, held in
Strasbourg, France, analyzed mod-
ern communism. Aided by teach-
ers and lecturers they discussed
the relationship between the
theory of communism and the ap-
plication of this theory by the
Soviets in their native homelands.
Every student enrolled in the
university must have escaped from
Soviet - dominated country and
must have a strong desire to lend
his support to the fight against
communism.
The university carefully screens
the applicants with an eye toward
bolstering the free world's forces
and educating the students to life
in the West.
IFC Ball Heads
Central committee members for
the 1956 IFC Ball which will be
held May 16 have been announced
by General Chairman Herb Schnei-
der of Phi Sigma Delta.
Heading the publicity committee
will be Fred Schatz of Phi Sigma
Delta. Ed Richter of Tau Kappa
Epsilon will chairman the decora-
tions committee.

.Prowler
PONTIAC, MICH. MP)-Gayle
Engle heard noises at midnight
in the basement of her home in
suburban Clarkston,
Alarmed, she summoned sher-
iff's men.
With pistols drawn, Deputies
Charles Rahn and Wilbert Lan-
kin threw open the cellar door.
Out popped a rabbit.
In a formal report, the depu-
ties wrote: "Because of dense.
ly populated area, we could not
kill the intruder. But Mrs. Engle
seemed satisfied and said she
could now go to sleep peace-
fully."
DAILY
OFFCIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Events Today
Senators Alexan'der Wiley and Wayne
Morse Debate: "Our Foreign Policy,
Right or Wrong?" tonight at 8:30 in
Hill Auditorium. 1955-56 Lecture Course.
Tickets available at the Auditorium box
office, 10:00 a.m.-8:30 p.m. today.
Placement Notices
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Bureau of Appointments:
Tues., Nov. 15:
J. L. Hudson, Detroit, Michigan-men
and women in any field for Executive
Training Program, including Office
Procedures, Advertising, and Merchan-
dising. ?
U.S. Navy, Wave Officer Procurement
-women for Officer Training Program,
also Sophomore and Junior women for
Summer Training Program.
Wed., Nov. 16:
General Electric, various locations-
men for Employee and Plant Community
Relations.
Thurs., Nov. 17:
U.S. Army, WAC Officer Procurement
-women for Officer Training Program.
Wayne County Bureau of Social Aid,
Detroit, Mich.-men and women in any
field for positions in Wayne County
and any other location in Michigan.
Fri., Nov. 18:
Sun Life Assurance Co., Canada and
U.S. offices-men for sales.
For appointments contact the Bureau

waiting men. Yesterday's 8 to 5
a.m. 'shift decided to use their
time in trying to translate French
and German for their classes.
During the night and early
morning the line began to length-
en. More than 20 persons were
present for the grand finish yes-
terday morning.
South Quad's whole block of
tickets amounted to 446 seats, al-
most the entire main floor of the
theater for Friday night.
This year's Union Opera, "Film
Flam," will be presented Tuesday,
Dec. 6 though Friday, Dec. 9.
Ticket blocks for housing groups
are now on sale.
Roundup
said during an interview with the
UCLA Bruin.
"It might even happen," he said,
"that the jury sympathizes with
the penurious defendent." Perkins
is an instructor in criminal law
at the university.
Regarding the possibility of
miscarriage of justice, Perkins
said, "It is one of the greatest
tragedies we can think of to con-
demn an innocent man. The death
sentence may tend to introduce'
delays and uncertainties leading
to a failure to convict . . . If this
is found to be the case, then we
should abolish the death penalty."
Linguistics
Makes Major
Contribution
Linguistics, the country cousin
of psychology, sociology, and an-
thropology, said Prof. David L.
Olmsted of the University of Cali-
fornia, has finally been let of
its closet and is now being allowed
to make a major contribution to
the studies of its relatives.
In a speech yesterday,Prof.
Olmsted commented that linguis-
tics is no longer the humble ser-
vant of the social sciences but has
come into its own. The linguistic
pebble has been polished into a
gen invaluable in tracing the
movement of people in history.
Olmsted spoke specifically about
the pre-historic problems of the
origin of the Indians in North
America, and the historic problem
of Afro-Americans.
The study of dialects, continued
the anthropologist, has helped to
advance the Bearing Straits hy-
pothesis that American Indians
had Asiatic ancestors, and shed
light on the origin of Negroes liv-
ing in various cultures throughout
the Americas.
Olmsted went on to say that
documents bearing on slaves are
of little use because they are
often incomplete. In Cuba all re-
cords of slavery have been de-
stroyed. Though it was a noble
gesture, its effect was a set-back
in the study of a culture.
We know, however, the Califor-
nia professor said, that the first
African slaves were brought to
Haitai in 1502. From that time
until the end of the 18th century
when slavery experienced its gold-
en age various area in Africa
were favorite picking places for
slave traders.
Olmsted is an assistant professor
of anthropology at the University
of California.
FRMER'9S
MRKET
troit Street

Open Wednesday and Saturday
for
Farm-Fresh Fruits, Vegetables,
Poultry and Eggs
Subscribe to
The Michigan
Daily

Constant reminders of the ice
age, which left its mark on the
earth's surface, stand along the
Mall side of the Natural Science
Building.
Prof. Edwin N. Goddard and
Prof. Russell C. Hussey of the
geology department explained how
the rock formations came into ex-
istence.
The date the University acquired
them is uncertain. Both Prof. God-
dard and Prof. Hussey believe it to
be more than 30 years ago.
The largest one, which looks like
a bit of protoplasm, was dug from
the Sibley Quarry in Trenton and
brought to the University. The
rock itself is gray limestone and
contains both coral fossils and
marks made by glaciers passing
over it in three different direc-
tions.
Boulder Contains Dikes
Standing to the right side of
the entrance door is 'a granite
boulder which has been highly
polished by someone, possibly be-
fore it appeared on campus. It
contains two pigmatite dikes, one
crossing the other. These dikes
were caused by coarse granite and
quartz which "invaded" the rock
in a molten (hot liquid) condition.
At the left side of the door can
be seen a rock which looks like
a huge piece of clay covered with
stones and dirt. This is a "con-
glomerate," made of gravel com-
pounded into one rock. This par-
ticular formation contains bits of
native copper of the type mined
at Calumet and Prof. Goddard be-
lieves, "probably came from that
region."
The other rocks against the
building are both sandstones. One
is a surface rock (obtained near
the surface of the water) with
readily distinguishable "ripple
Conference On
Enrollment Issue
Discussion topics for the Stu-
dent-Faculty-Administration Con-
ference Dec. 9 were decided yes-
terday by the Union Relations
Committee.
The general theme of the con-
ference will be "What are the im-
plications of increased enrollment
at the University?" The counsel-
ing program, physical facilities, re-
lation of extra-curricular activities
to the academic and admissions
problems in a period of increasing
enrollment are the four specific
subjects.
The conference is planned as a
means of interchanging ideas be-
tween the three participating
groups. General meetings will pre-
cede and follow the discussion
meetings.
Any Name,InitialClub or
SGreekLetter Ring in Solid
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STER I.NG ARTISTS
BOX 502, IowA CITY, owA

By DONNA WILLS

marks" made by the rippling of
the water passing over the rock's
surface.
These ripples are even and
smooth, but the surface is slowly
peeling (a slight eroding as though
someone were chipping away at
the rock with a chisel).
Prof. Goddard believes that it
would take hundreds of years be-
fore this constant eroding had any
effect on the stone's appearance.
'K' Embedded In Rock
The other sandstone is probably
the most interesting of all in that
it has a "K" embedded in its sur-
face. This "fucoidal" as it is
called is thought to have been
made by an old branch of a tree,
mud filling the cracks or an ani-
mal burrow.
According to Prof. Hussey the
word "fucoidal" is applied when
there is no other known name for
a formation of this type.
There are many more of these
million-year-old examples of rock
formations here on campus, but
those near the Natural' Science
building seem to draw the most
attention and questions.
s
SAVE
DO LLA RS!
SAVE'
DAYS!
fly home on
UNITED
AIR COACH
Stretch those vacation dol-
lars and days by taking
advantage of United's right
combination of low fares,
fast flights and frequent
schedules.
NO SEAT HERE
And enjoy the extra com-
fort of roomy 2-abreast
seating - exclusive on
United. Allflights on mod.
ern 4-engine Mainliners.
Detroit: for reservations,
call WOodward 55500
or an authorized travel agent.
un tr-

-Daily-Hal Leeds
THIS ODD LOOKING STONE is one of the many million-year-
old rock formations on the University campus.
Phli Morris
-- made gentle
for modern taste Lf t

'A

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

for the
specialt attention
of
ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERS

,..

AND

PHYSICISTS

-Daily-John Hirtzel
PROF. GEORGE WALD, of the
biochemistry department at Har-
vard University will deliver a
lecture on "Biochemical Evolu-
tion" at 8 p.m. today in Audi-
torium B, Angell Hall.
Drought Damage
May Bring Loans
WASHINGTON ()-The agri-
culture department today desig-
nated 13 Michigan counties where
emergency loans may be made to
farmers whose crops and pastures
were damaged by drought the past
summer.
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
Ext. 371.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Michigan Civil Service announces ex-
am for Social Worker Al.
For'information contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
Ext. 371.

-
~t SEEall op Euope.-O
-i
You havet.liVE it!
That's why American Express Student Tours
are expertly planned to include a full measure
of individual leisure-ample free time to dis-
cover your Europe-as well as the most com-
prehensive sight-seeing program available
anywhere! Visit England, Holland, Belgium,
Germany, Switzerland, Italy and France-
accompanied by distinguished tour leaders
-enjoy superb American Express service
throughout.
8 Grand Tours ... 53 or 61 days .. .via famous ships:
Ile de France, United States, Liberth, America, Flandre.
$1,213 up
Also Regular Tours... 43 days ... $861 up
For complete information, see your Campus
Representative, local Travel Agent or
American Express Travel Service,
nenhr: Intitute of International Education

II

H U (sT-CS

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT LABORATORIES

National Spotlight on Ann Arbor TONIGHT!
The Debate of The Year-Arranged for Ann Arbor Only!

Culver City, Los Angeles County, California

U. S. SENATORS

HUGHES ANNOUNCES
OPENINGS ON ITS STAFFS
FOR THOSE RECEIVING
B.S.. M.S. OR PH.D.
DEGREES DURING THE
COMING YEAR.

NOVEMBER 16
MEMBEfRS OF THE HUGHES ENGINEERING
STAFF WILL CONDUCT PERSONAL
INTERVIEWS ON YOUR CAMPUS.
CONSULT YOUR SCHOOL PLACEMENT
OFFICE NOW FOR PPOINT"NT,

ALEXANDER

WAYNE

W LEY

MORSEi

OPENINGS ARE IN THESE FIELDS:

for work in

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