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November 13, 1955 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Communists are augmenting-and Red agitators are making the most With cut-rote orms from Red Czeche.
profiting by-the unrest in French of their opportunity to wideethe slovkit srriving ieEgypt, wlthe
North Africa which threatens effective split between Tukey and Greece-- possibilit strong they lse will
French rule and endangers that no. partners in NATO-over the future supplind to ether Artb states, mny
tion's already shaky position as one of the contested island of L(pres, diplomats foresee o resumptions a
of the worlds major powers. a British crown colony. the Palestin e Wr
Mediterranean Called a Danger Area

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BY DAVID L. BOW3EN
Associated Press Newsfeature Writer
Just a few months ago the Medi-
terranean region appeared rela-
tively tranquil. If not a com-
pletely satisfactory link in the
chain of Western defenses around
the Communist world, at least it
seemed one where great progress
had been made and future pros-
pects were bright.
Now, since the Soviet Union has
begun its campaign of smiling in
one direction while it sows discord
in the other, the Mediterranean
has been transformed from a
source of Western strength into
a- source of acute danger. The
French are hard put to hold their
position in North Africa, Greece
has refused to associate with Tur-
key in a NATO exercise, natives
of Cyprus are violently agitating.
for departure of the British, and
United States diplomats are call-
ing the eastern end of the Medi-
terranean the most critical thea-
ter of worldwide Cold War.

Great Britain and. the United
States declared they would act to
prevent aggression by either side.
Since then they have attempted to
maintain a balance between tie
hostile camps.
Success Uncertain
With Russia furnishing Egypt
with the means of altering this
condition, the West has no course
of action, certain of success. Among
suggestions so far advanced are:
(1) match the Communist arms to
Arabs with Western equipment for'
Israel, (2) assert in forceful terms
a. Western guarantee of present
borders, and (3) redouble efforts
to halt the increasing Russian in-
fluence by stepping up American,
aid to Arab League members for
irrigation and other development
projects.
Unfortunately, the first two of
these suggestions would probably
drive the Arabs into the Russians'
embrace. The third might well'
prove ineffective.
Some Western diplomats at
Geneva have said they expect the
Russians to cap their adventure
in the strategic area by offering
to join with the West in organiz-,
ing a new collective security alli-
ance which would bind' all the
states of the Middle East to act in
unison against aggression. This
would give the Russians a voice in
Middle Eastern affairs, which they
would undoubtedly use to wreck
the Western plans for a regional
grouping pledged to stand together
against Communist expansion.
Mlke Most of Chance
ThehSoviet Union has no direct
hand.in the second Mediterranean
zone, the quarrel over Cyprus, but
the Communists are making the
most of their chance to create
trouble for Greece, Turkey, Britain
and NATO.

The situation there is this: Al-
though Greece has never owned
the island of Cyprus, four-fifths
of its one-half million population
are members of the Greek Ortho-
dox church and consider Greece
their cultural home. They are.
clamoring for a chance to decide
their own future. If given a choice,
few doubt they would. choose un-
ion with Greece and removal.of
the British, who have been in con-
trol since 1914. With the evacua-
tion of Suez, Cyprus became 'the-
principal British base in the eas-
tern Mediterranean and so Britain,
is unwilling !'to depart. Turkey;
which ruled Cyprus long ago; sides
with Britain and, does not want to
see the island go t the Greeks.
These conflicting desires- have
erupted into a potentially danger-
ous squabble. The tug-of-war has
rekindled old bitterness between
Greece and Turkey.
Moscow Supports Violence
At the other end of the Medi-;
terranean, the French are far from
satisfying the demand of Arab na-
tionalists for self-determination.
Moscow has openly supported the
anti-French violence in North
Africa and the Red bloc fans thej
flames with inflammatory broad-
casts from the satellite European
capitals.
No one in the West knows exact-
ly how great a part Red agents are
playing in the native revolt against
the French. However, it is cer-
tain the Communists are in the
background ready to move for con-.
trol if law and order disappear.
The French have long maintain-
ed that Egypt has sent arms into
North Africa across Libya. dome
have claimed that many of the
guns arriving in Egypt now froxg
Czechoslovakia will turn up next
in Algeria and Morocco.

Nisei Like
A enicans,
Americans born of Japanese
parents are generally indisting-
uishable from a. general cross sec-
tion of the American public," Prof.
George A. DeVos of the psychol-
ogy department says.
"There are. certain personality
characteristics that could betrac-
ed back to Influences of Japanese
culture," he continued.'
A study started in 1947 by Prof.
DeVos and ,a group of psycholo-
gists, psychiatrists, and sociolog-
ists has proven that acculturation
(acquiring new culture) of the
Japanese ' Americans is almost
complete.
The study was intended to show
host the ,Nisel, as Japanese-Ameri-
cans-are-called,were .changing in
personality and to discover what
personality characteristics they
inherited from their parents who
Were born 'and brought , up in
lJapan.
One important finding shows
that Japanese-Americans tend to
white-collar jobs, Prof. DeVos
said.
A survey also shows that Nisei
have an average of one and: a half
years of college as compared with
Americans'who have an average
education of three years of high
school,
"These findings imply that AM-
bition and respect for education,
two basiccharacteristics ofsJapa-
nese eultureinfluence American-
born Japanese the lecturer in
the psychology department re-
marked.
Prof. DeVos said that family
conflicts are a main source of dif-
ficulty in the new culture. Nisei
accept values as Americans do.
This, then, conflicts with values
held by their parents, he asserted.
This study was conducted in two
large cities, Nagoya and Okay-
ama, and three small villages,
Niiki Buraku, Nagura Mura and,
Saku No Shima, all located in cen-
tral Japan.
The random sample was based
on age, sex and social class char-
dteristics in the urban areas.
Rural areas were chosen accord-
ing to their functions such, as
farming, forestry, and fishing.

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Friction Increasing
The disruptive hand of the
Kremlin is increasing the danger-
ous friction between the Arab
states and Israel. By arranging
for shipment of MIG jet fighter
planes, tanks and other heavy
equipment from Red Czechoslo-
vakia to Egypt, and seeking to ar-
range similar deals with other na-
tions in the area, Russia Is jar-
ring the delicate balance of power
between the Arabs and the Israel-
is.
American officials have not
been optimistic that talks between
Western foreign ministers and
Molotoy at Geneva will cause the
Russians to halt their program in
the Middle East. Instead, they ex-
Pect the Kremlin to increase its
pressure and try for. even closer
ties with Arabs by offers of econ-
omic aid.
The skillful Soviet offensive has
put the West on the spot. In the
United Nations and outside it, the
Western Powers have backed the
right of Israel to exist on a part
of the ancient Jewish homeland.
In a tripartite declarations in 1951
when Israel emerged victorious
from the Palestine War, France,

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