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November 10, 1955 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1955-11-10

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Sixty-Sixth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. * Phone o 2-3241

"Well, Heavens-To-Lizzie!"

f

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only. This must be noted in all reprints.
THURSDAY,.NOVEMBER 10 1955 NIGHT EDITOR: LEE MARKS
Supreme Court Tactfully
Aoids Delnite Decrees
THE Supreme Court, still handling the segre- In addition, the school problem involves chil-
gation issue with kid gloves, continues to dren, many of whom have not yet been fully
remove the mask of fear and hatred, running indoctrinated with the conceptions of racial
rampant in the South since reconstruction days. inferiority. Parents, in whom the hatred or fear
In outlawing segregation practices in public is fully manifested, are involved in a more in-
parks and playgrounds, the court tactfully and direct fashion.
wisely avoided definite procedural decrees, but In the parks, however, adults are involved.
followed the tradition of leaving these to lower In many cases they are not the type adults
courts, established previously in education is- who will sit down and ponder the situation, or
sues. hold town meetings discussing the issue. In-
The decision comes as another in the shower stead they are people with strongly imbedded
of blows to the "separate but equal" doctrine, opinions which they have had for lifetimes.
which has served to legalize segregation in tax- If carried to extremes, town meetings might
supported facilities since 1898. A year and a be replaced by violent riots. Instead, the case
half ago this same court heldthe doctrine un- will probably result in both groups shying
applicable in public schools. away from integration.
Now it has been swept away from the gates Events such as the Till Case remain as grim
of "white" playgrounds. Results are already reminders that the South is hardly ready to
taking form. In Georgia protests are loud, and adopt complacently a program of integration.
threats to close all public parks are first in the -LEW HAMBURGER
propaganda efforts of the anti-integration
quarters.
HE COURT'S aversion to dealing with the Wanted: New Record
problem of direct implementation of the A
new law has come under considerable fire of WANTED: a crowd of 75,000 for Saturday's
late. It is attacked as a sign of weakness, and Indiana game.
fear that the decision may not be applicable. Why not? The attraction pits one of the
great-though erratic-Michigan teams against
However, it Is basically a sound method for the always dangerous Hoosiers, the most under-
handling the situation. The lower, courts are rated squad in the Big Ten. An attendance of
closer to the actual situation, which differs in 75000 coupled with the promised sellout for
different sections of the South. the Ohio State contest, would establish a new
Actually, this latest decision itself had been all-time gate record for Wolverine home games.
authored in an appellate court in Richmond,
Va., after incidents in Baltimore, and now up? Right now, Coach Bennie Oosterbaan's men
held by the high court, are probably in need of a show of strong sup-
Its repercussions will continue to be felt for port on the part of their fans. Everyone loves
Itsyrepercsionsd willconnsitionueto bcflty fora winner, but it often takes a good deal of
many years, and the transition to racially in- backing to make even a strong team come back
tigrated playgrounds and parks is still in the into the winning ranks after a humiliating
stage of a pious wish. The actual intigration loss.
is a long-term project. Of course, a ticket sales campaign cannot
It depends entirely on the will of a people, be intended for the students directly. We have
The Supreme Cdurt in this instance may only our tickets, but thousands of relatives and
serve as a sensory organ to perceive the emo- friends within a radius of 200 miles could be
tions of the people in a particular situation. It interested in taking advantage of their last
cannot, as an implementor, bring about the cne ess thky'g aady ou Ohio
utoia anynorherer enisin i onitswa chance (unless they've already bought Ohio
utopia many northerners envision is on its way. State tickets) to 'see the Wolverines in action
THERE are severa factors which stand as at home this season. Michigan is still in a
concrete proof against the somewhat idealis- good position to be the Big Ten champion and
tic hope thatintigrationis taking place now. Rose Bowl representative
In the schools, where integration has been A sale of 75,000 admissions-enough for a
carried out, it has been relatively successful, new record-is certainly possible. Indiana
However, not a large majority of Negro students drew 85,938 here in 1947. All that's needed now
are involved in the programs. It still remains a Is some student spirit to promote what should
future problem. be a popular item.
-DICK CRAMER

-5iii-s+
i[TI K
~)I
t s

AT LYDIA IWENDELSSOHN:
'Setzuan' Confusing,
Tedious Morality Play
BERTOLT BRECHT has written a thoroughly confused, tedious and
childish morality play better adapted to a philosophical tome than
the stage. The Speech Department, apparently more concerned with
presenting something different than good, struggled valiantly but mere-
ly succeeded, with some noteworthy exceptions, in pointing up its own
ineptness.
"The Good Woman of Setzuan" can't be dismissed as lightly as
this, however, as the author is capable of some striking dramatic effects,
if incapable of writing a lucid and cohesive drama. Furthermore, sev-
eral members of the cast showed exceptional promise and gave outstand-
ing performances in the losing cause.
The setting is "a somewhat Chinese town of today." translated, this
means that Chinese costumes and make-up effects are used. The story
concerns the plight of Shen Te, a local streetwalker who serves as the
foil to demonstrate Brecht's thesis: HOW CAN GOOD TRIUMPH T
A WORLD COMPOSED OF HAVES AND HAVE NOTS, EVILNESS,
STUPIDITY AND SELFISHNESS?
Those who stayed until the end know little more than they knew
yesterday morning except that the author took three hours to confess
that he too hasn't discovered the answer.
THIS SEEMS to be a profound theme but the intellectual stimu-
lation to make it so is buried beneath some of the most horrendous

dialogue and inane situations you
VON KARAJON:

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

Gripes and Razz of M' Gridders

I

IN THIS CORNER:
Stench in Ole Miss

Miracle's Over...
To The Editor:
MAYBE now they'll listen to me.
All year I've been yelling
about Michigan's inability to move
the ball consistently, but I've been
drowned out by the people point-
ing to our undefeated record (be-
fore the Illinois game) and confi-
dently stating that our boys al-
ways come through when the
chips are down. Well, we didn't
get our weekly miracle last Satur-
day and got plastered as a result,
which just goes to prove that the
best way to win a football game
is to play sixty minutes of good
ball per game instead of just ten.
I wouldn't mind our usual week-
ly heroics if we were just a strug-
gling team with average talent,
but we've got so many good play-
ers that our second team is the
equal of many first teams. I know
every team we play goes all out
to beat us, but that still doesn't
explain why Michigan with its
"best line in years" has been out-
charged more often than not and
usually makes less yards by rush-
ing than the opposition.
There is only one solution to
this problem. Bennie must go! He
cannot build a consistent attack
with all kinds of talent, whereas
other coaches do better with half
as much material.
I attended the University of Illi-
nois in 1952, when Illinois had a
2 and 5 Big Ten record. That team
had very little talent, but it was a
real pleasure to see a well coached
team playing up to its full poten-
tial. And this was one of the five
Eliot-coached teams that have
beaten Michigan in the last six
years. I'd like to see the score if
Eliot had the talent to work with
that Oosterbaan has.

I don't think we can get Eliot
away from Illinois, but we'd be
wise to try to get Hank Fonde from
Ann Arbor High School (or anyA
one else!). And before anyone
speaks up in Oosterbaan's de-
fense, he ought to try to peddle
Bennie off on some other school
and see how far he gets.
--Charlie Carroll, '56
Sympathies Expressed. .
DEAR BEREAVED, WE MEN
OF MSU WISH TO EXPRESS
OUR DEEP SYMPATHY WITH
YOUR GRIEF WITH THE PASS-
ING OF THE WOLVERINE
MYTH.-
WE KNOW HOWEVER, THAT
IT WILL BE A COMFORT TO
THOSE THREE CONSIDERATE
SOULS WHO RECENTLY WROTE
THE STATE NEWS OF THE
CONCERN AT THE SPARTANS'
ALLEGED FALSE FEELING OF
SUPERIORITY OVER THE HAP-
LESS WOLVERINES THEY WILL
BE PLEASED TO REALIZE THAT
NO LONGER BY ANY STRETCH
OF THE IMAGINATION CAN
ANY SUCH FEELING BE CON-
SIDERED FALSE.-
THIS SUDDEN TURN OF
EVENTS, WILL NO DOUBT CON-
STITUTE A SEVERE BLOW TO
YOUR ALREADY NONE-TOO-
WELL-NURTURED EGO, BUT
THERE ARE CERTAIN MEAS-
URES YOU CAN TAKE TO MINI-
MIZE THIS FEELING-
1-FORGET COMPLETELY IF
POSSIBLE, THAT WHILE YOU
ARE BEING RATHER NASTILY
MAULED BY THE NAUGHTY
OLD ILLINI THE SPARTANS
(WHO HAD BEATEN ILLINOIS
21-7) WERE RATHER HANDILY
DISPOSING OF PURDUE (WHO

HAD ALSO BEATEN THE ILLI-
NI) 27-0-
2-UPON ARISING DAILY AND
AT LEAST FIVE TIMES PER
DAY THEREAFTER REPEAT TO
YOURSELF "THE SCORE IS THE
ONLY IMPORTANT THING THE
FACT THAT THE RELATIVELY
UNTRIED SPARTANS COM-
PLETELY OUTPLAYED THE.
VETERAN WOLVERINES IN
NEARLY ALL DEPARTMENTS
BUT SCORING MEANS NOTH-
ING THE SCORES THE THING."
WE SINCERELY HOPE THAT
OUR ADVICE MAY BE A COM-
FORT TO YOU IN YOUR TIME
OF GRIEF.-
THOMAS FOX, JOHN CHAPMAN
(and 32 others)..
Disliked Concert.. .
To the Editor: .
DURING the past few years, I.
have read numerous music re-
views in The Michigan Daily. Many
of these have been exceptionally
good; most of them at least pass-
able. But recently a certain de-
terioration has been apparent. This
deterioration has increased almost
exponentially of late, but the
Cleveland Orchestra review was
something of a landmark in inept-
ness.
It missed not only the fine
points, but the medium and even
the, major points of just why the
Cleveland Orchestra's performance
marked that organizations as sec-
ond-rate.
The constant straining for ob-
scure effectapparent in the Mo-
zart symphony; the lack of con-
trol during the Strauss; the tempo
manipulation during the Schu-
mann symphony disturbed even
elementary students in music ap-
preciation.
-David Kessel, Grad.

London
Orchestra
Enthralls
LAST night Hill Auditorium's
audience witnessed that pe-
culiar gender of performance that
occurs seldom in a life time. It
was more than merely an or-
chestra concert, it was a perform-
ance of the perfect instrument in
the hands of the Master Musician
--Herbert Von Karajon.
Ever moulding the orchestra to
his subtle variations in tempo and
dynamics this great conductor
proved to be master of the orches-
tra at all times. Every measure
of every composition bore the
mark of Von Karajon's individu-
ality which was what enthralled
the audience throughout the eve-
ning.
Sibelius' Fifth Symphony was
the high point of the evening.
From the beautifully executed
Horn introduction to the gigantic
climax of the persistant disjunct
theme of the brasses that ends the
composition, Van Karajon brought
new meaning to this work.
ALTHOUGH this symphony is
written in three movements it can
be said to be a four movement
work because Cthe first movement
consists of two distinct sections.
The first part is in double rhythm
while the second half of the move-
ment is in a fast triple meter. Both'
sections use the same melodic ma-
terial. The second movement is in
a restful relaxed mood while. the
third movement brings a dramatic
climax to the work with its driving
rhythmic melody.
It was little wonder that the
orchestra's encore is Sibelius' most
popular work. With its inspiring
melodies and its stirring rhythms
Finlandia has great appeal for all.
* * *
BRAHM'S Variations on a theme
by Haydn also received wonderful
treatment in the hands of these
sensitive musicians from London.
After the first statement of the
rather lilting theme it is worked
through many moods varying from
restful lyricism to joyful dancing:
Finally the original theme emerges
triumphantly in a victorious ver-
sion sounded in the brasses.
The E-flat Major symphony of
Mozart sounded refreshing with
the additions of Von Karajon's
genius for rhythmic subtlty.
-Bruce Jacobson

I

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

can imagine. Lines like, "Being
wicked is just being clumsy"
are commonplace. Interesting, but
what does it mean? Three gods
searching for "good people" float-
ing in and out of a sewer and the
lead transforming herself into
characters embodying the purest
good and evil' don't help much
either.
Credit Brecht with near mastery
of several engrossing methods of
theatrical form. Credit Bailey Car-
roll (who plays a meandering wat-
er carrier attempting to provide a
touch of clarity), Susan Goldberg
(mother of the villain), David
Lloyd (barber) and, most of all,
Gwen Arner (as Shen Te) with
magnificent performances. Then
debit most of the on and off-stage
crews with an inability to com-
municate, but give them your un-
divided sympathy.
-David Marlin

M ISSISSIPPI sat back and sighed today,
but there was an unmistakable stench of
halitosis in the air.
After months of fear and uncertainty, follow-
ing the disappearance and murder of 14-year-
old Emmett Till, the two white men charged
with the crime, Roy Bryant and his half-brother
J. W. Milan, were finally and completely
cleared, The latest decision, arrived at yester-
day by a Greenwood, Miss. grand jury, was
not to indict the men for kidnapping, although
they at one time allegedly admitted taking
Till from his home "by mistake."
Today Mr. Bryant and Mr. Milan were free
men. In the eyes of Mississippi, this was as
it should be. Even if all the prosecuting attor-
nies' "facts" were true, "nigger-killing" was no
crime. Not when a Negro had crossed the
bounds of the line of "rights" that the South
had established for the race. That was the
crime, and now everyone could rest assured
that it was repaid, justice had been done.
Looking down at Ole Miss from the North,
the "Yankee" will have little understanding of
what this justice means. He will point to the
evidence that Till's uncle Mose Wright had
stood in the Sumner court room, looked at
Bryant and Milan, and told how these two
men came to his house and asked for "the
boy from Chicago, the one that did the talking
at Money."
Editorial Staff
Dave Baad............. ......... Managing Editor
Jim Dygert.................,.......... City Editor
Murry Frymer .................+.... Editorial Director
Debra Durchslag ..................... Magazine Editor
David Kaplan ......................... Feature Editor
Jane Howard ......................... Associate Editor
Louise Tyor................. Associate Editor
Phil Douglis.................Sports Editor
Alan Eisenberg................ Associate Sports Editor
Jack Horwitz ........Associate Sports Editor
Mary Hellthaler ................. Women's Editor
Elaine Edmonds ............. Associate Women's Editor
-John Hirtzel .....................OChief Photographer
Business Staff
Dick Alstrom ....................... Business Manager
Bob lgenfritz ........... Associate Business Manager

MURRY FRYMER
AND THE Northerner will point to the evi-
dence by Wright's niece, Mrs. Mamie Brad-
ley, when the defense was denying that the
body found in the Tallahatchie River was Till's:
"Beyond the shadow of a doubt," she said, "that
was my boy's body."
And when they found Emmett Till's ring on
the dead boy's hand, the Northerner won't
understand how the Mississippian could say
that some evil plot was responsible for putting
it there.
But evidence wasn't important in this case..
To the whites in Mississippi, this was all intru-
sion, someone was making a mountain out
of a molehill. The Negroes were born to pick
cotton and remember their places. It wasn't
the South's fault that slavery, "a good thing,"
was abolished almost a hundred years ago.
Defense attorney at the Sumner trial, J. W.
Kellum hit it right on the nose when he said,
if Roy and J. W. are convicted, "where under
the shining sun is the land of the free and the
home of the brave?"
yODAY, EVERYTHING is back to normal
again in Mississippi. Or is it? 'For a change,
the Mississippian found a great many strangers
in his midst, even Negro strangers. But these
Negroes were from up North, wearing suits and
ties, many of them doctors and lawyers, edu-
cators, and even some Congressmen.
And more people were talking now, both up
North and even in the South. There were
some signs of change, slow-moving, almost
creeping, but still change.
Students at the University of Mississippi had
recently joined in to finance a memorial schol-
arship in the memory of "Blind Jim Ivy" a
long-time Negro football fan of Ole Miss teams.
And the Jackson Daily News, also joining in
the campaigncould write something like this:,
"The Daily News invites newspapers through-
out the state to assist in publicizing this memor-
ial fund. It. can bring great benefit to the
state by helping to educate our Negro young-
sters, thereby making them better citizens,
better able to take their share in responsibility
in the Mississippi community."
Admittedly the money goes to a "separate
but eaual" institution-but WHITES are talking

THE Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 355;
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication. Notices
for the Sunday edition must be in
by 2'p.m. Friday.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1953
VOL. LXvII, NO. 39
General Notices
The University Senate will meet on
Thurs., Dec. 8, at 4:15 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall. Senate members are
reminded of the new rule which requires
that "All motions or resolutions, in
order to be included on the "agenda,
must be submitted to the Secretary of
the Senate at least fourteen days before
the meeting at which they are to bq
introduced ...
All students planning to meet the
Directed Teaching requirement for the
Secondary School Teaching certifioate'
during the Spring Semester 1956, must
file their applications in Room 3206,
University High School before the end
of the present semester.
Anyone failing to make application
will seriously jeopardize his chances for
securing an assignment.
Martha Cook Building. Those inter-
ested in the few February vacancies at
Martha Cook please call 23225 any week
Iday between 6:00 a.m. and.6:00 p.m. for
appointments. Sophomore and Junior
women without second semester con-
tracts are eligible to apply. Any out-
-standing applications should come in
at once./
Members of the Faculty are invited to
apply for a visiting teachers grant of-
fered through the Carnegie Corporation.
The undergraduate colleges at Chicago,
Columbia, Harvard and Yale are collab-
orating in a Joint Program for Intern-
ships in General Education. Colleges
and Universities may nominate one of
their own staff members to spend a
year at the institution of his choice as
a visiting teacher in the general educa-
tion program. Assistant professors and
associate professors are urged to apply.
A leave of absence will be granted for
one year and the visiting teachers salary
will be paid by the host institution from
funds provided by the Carnegie Corpora-
tion. Remuneration will be based on
the individual's regular salary with ap-
propriate allowances for transportation,
increased living costs, etc. Further in-
formation and application blanks may
be obtained in the Graduate School
Office.
iEhe Following Student Sponsored So-
cial Events are approved for the coming
week-end. Social chairmen are remind-
ed that requests for approval for social
events are due in the Office of Studeht
Affairs not later than 12:00 noon on
the Tues. prior to the event.
Nov. 10: Alpha Kappa Alpha and
Kappa Alpha Psi.
Nov. 11: Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha
Delta Pi, Alpha Xi Delta, Delta Gamma,
Delta Theta Phi, Jordan Hall, Kappa
Kappa Gamma, Tau Kappa Epsilon,
Winchell House.
Nov. 12: Acacia, Allen-Rumsey, Alpha
Epsilon Pi, Alpha Sigma Phi, Betsy
Barbour, Chi Phi, Cooley-Strauss, Delta
Chi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Delta Sigma
Pi, Delta Theta Phi, Gomberg House,
Greene House, Henderson House, Kelsey
House, Lloyd-Chicago, Phi Alpha Delta,
Phi Alpha Kappa, Phi Chi, Phi Delta
Phi, Phi Kappa Sigma, Phi Rho Sigma,
Nu Sigma Nu, Reeves House, Scott

EGYPT PLAYING BALL WITH COMMUNISM?
Visit By She pilor Creates Dangerous Situation

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Egypt is wary of
communism yet is playing ball with
Moscow.- That is one of many factors
complicating the Middle East tinder-
box. How this situation developed is
explored by William L. Ryan, in this
article, second of three.)
By WILLIAM L. RYAN
AP Foreign News Analyst
Only about three months ago,
Western diplomats were express-
ing cautious hope for prospects of
stability in the Middle East.
But on July 23, an important
guest arrived in Cairo to help cele-
brate an anniversary of Egypt's
anti-Farouk revolution.
Shortly thereafter this guest had
long conferences with the youth-
ful Premier, Gamel Abdel Nasser,
and other leaders of Egypt's revo-
lution council.
From that point on, the Middle
East sitution grew steadily more
dangerous.
THE GUEST was Dmitri Trofi-
movich Shepilov, named just a

of the soil. The revolutionary rul-
ers were young, ambitious, unskill-
ed in government and foreign af-
fairs, jealous of their independ-
ence and eager to make Egypt
the leader of the Arab world if
not the whole world of Islam.
THIS GOVERNMENT showed
great promise. Its leaders were
reat promise. Its leaders were
military men, but men who had
experienced the war in Israel and
respected the Israeli military
punch. But the government was
beset with all sorts of internal
problems in a poverty-stricken
and extremely nationalistic coun-
try.
The defeat of the Arab world at
the hands of Israel still smarted.
The chance to join the Sudan to
Egypt in a lasting union that
might guarantee Egypt's' interests
in the Nile waters for a long time
to come was fading rapidly. The
Sudanese seemed to prefer the

the word "liberation." Cairo prop-
aganda pumped the idea constant-
ly into French North Africa.
** *
THEN, BY a single stroke the
Russians, after Shepilov's visit,
injected an entirely new factor into
the situation. Egypt could have
arms in quantity from the Com-
munist bloc nations - 200 MIG
Soviet fighters, 100 Russian tanks,
a half dozen submarines, quanti-
ties of artillery and other arms--
all at fantastically cutrate prices.
Whether this equipment was
castoff and obsolete from Euro-
pean standpoints hardly mattered.
It could tip the balance in the
Middle East.
More " than that, there was a
promise of Communist arms for
other states thirsting for revenge
on Israel. There would remaifn
only the problem of training Arabs
to use modern arms. Red bloc
technicians are doing that now.
As matters stand Western ob-

-European (Time)
PREMIER ABDEL NASSER
~ .. receives dangerous visitor
In Red jargon, "democratic"
means Communist. As for the
s: ln int - 1A 1 -. - -A ril

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