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November 09, 1955 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-09

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INDIAN STUDENT ITTY:
Raps Diplomatic Failures

Englishman Discusses
Monarchy's Attributes
I E

By ETHEL KOVITZ
"Many of today's internationa
problems were precipitated by tre
mendous diplomatic failures on th
part of the western world," accord
ing to C. I. Itty, travelling secre.
tary for the Student Christia
Movement of India, Pakistan an
Ceylon.
One outcome of this diplomati
failure is the Arab-Israeli conflict
Itty commented. "The West di
not'realize the situation was com
ing and now is criticizing the
Arabs for taking arms from Rus
sia."
"By keeping friendly relation
with the Arabs the United State
could have influenced them t
hold the present borders. The
United States could have give
them arms without giving then
permission to use them," he con-
tinued.
Arab Confidence
Itty suggests that only by mak-
ing the Arabs feel more confi-
dent in U.S. intentions can thi
country influence them to kee
the present borders,
Itty is in Ann Arbor this week
to speak to study groups prepar-
ing for a December inter-colleg-
iate conference on the mission of
the Church for a world in revolu-
tion, to be held in Athens, Ohio.
Many types of revolutions are
taking place in the East today
"Political revolutions are occur-
ring where new independent states
are coming into being. The growth
of industry shows the economic
revolution."
"The social scene, too, is under-
going revolution," Itty explained.
"Caste systems and joint family
systems breaking down, and the
status of women increasing are
all manifestations of social revo-
lution."
Itty denied that the changes in
Asia were toward communism.
Actually, western values are grow-
ing. However, the communists
are trying to direct these demo-
cratic ideas to their advantage.
Freedom, Order, Justice
Asia's revolution is really an
attempt to achieve threerdemo-
cratic ideals: freedom, order and
justice, Itty explained. The free-
dom manifests itself in a desire for
nationalism, the order in a desire
for stability of the government and
the justice in an attempt to ob-
tain economic security and social
equality.
"The communists appeal to all
three things. They promise free-
dom from western interference,
they say they have the best eco-
nomic program and they say they
have the most racial considera-
tion."
Some of the West's diplomatic
failures have come by not satis-
fying one of these three desires,
Itty commented. He attributes the
West's loss of Indo-China to not
satisfying that country's nationist
feelings.
Itty hopes that the December
conference on revolution will not
only discuss the task of the
Church, but will do something
about getting these tasks accomp-
lished.
He believes that the Western
church's main job is to help
the established Eastern churches
strengthen the forces of democra-
cy.
But Nothing Else
This could be done by the west-
ern churches sending missions to
the East. "But we don't want the
old type of missionaries who de-
nounce our whole culture. We
don't want to replace the god-giv-
en community with western in-
dividualism.
"We don't want to make the
mistake of the western world in
creating an urbanized society
where material progress is there
but -nothing else" Itty remarked.

The western churches shouldk

C. I. ITTY... Student Christian Movement Secretary.

also encourage western govern-
ments to aid the East economically
by lowering tariffs and granting
loans, he said.
"But the West must clear eco-
nomic aid from political strings.
You mustn't aid India and in re-
turn expect her to support every-
thing Henry Cabot Lodge says
in the United Nations," he con-
cluded.
Itty will be in Ann Arbor until
Sunday.
He will speak at the Baptist
student center at 7:00 p.m. Sun-1

day. He will also address one of
the study-discussion groups for
the conference in Lane Hall at
9 p.m. today.
Roundtable to Hear
Professor Kauper
Prof. Paul Kauper of the law
school will speak on "The Consti-
tutional Basis for Separation of
Church and State" at 8:00 p.m. to-
morrow in Rackham Amphithea-
tre.

By DIANE LABAKAS
Constitutional monarchy is one
of the most practical forms of
government, according to English
student James Wilkes.
Wilkes, who attended Cambridge
for four years, is studying chemi-
cal' engineering at the University
on a one-year King George schol-
arship.
"One of the main advantages of
a constitutional form of monar-
chy," said Wilkes, "is that it is a
more stable type of government
because people always look up
to the king and queen even though
political parties frequently change
office."
Lack of political affiliation of
the police and army was another
advantage of constitutional mon-
archy cited by Wilkes.
He said the English people pos-
sess an avid interest in royal cere-
monies which they would not be
able to see under any other form
of government. .He added that
Begins Plans
For Winter
By KEITH DEVRIES
Yesterday's drop-and-melt snow
was a warning of things to come
for the Plant Department.
With almost all storm windows
up onhcampus buildings and with
fall bulb plantings nearing com-
pletion, the attention of the de-
partment is focusing on snow re-
moval.
Five University tractors are be-
ing converted from tree-planting
and digging machines to snow
plows.
Barrels on loading docks of ma-
jor buildings are to be filled with
sand and salt by Monday night
and will 'probably be re-filled of-
ten. Nearly 20 tons were used last
year in an unusually mild winter.
.A complete schedule- for snow
removal has been readied. The
University hospital will be getting
priority always. Its ambulance en-
trance will be cleared as soon as
possible after a snowfall to be
followed by streets and sidewalks
in the area.
Couzens Hall will be one of the
first dormitories to be shoveled
out so that the nurses will have
easy access to the hospital.
Because of its importance to the
hospital and dormitories, Food
Service has also been given pri-
ority.
The tractor clearing the campus
will stop in its work only between

the people in general do not mind
the cost of coronation.
One Disadvantage
The only disadvantage of con-
stitutional monarchy, Wilkes as-
serted, is the lack of power of
the king and queen over legisla-
tive matters. He remarked that
there always is a possibility of a
monarchist abusing his powers and
eventually becoming a dictator.
There actually is little differ-
ence between the British system of
government and that of the United
States, Wilkes declared. He ex-
plained that the Prime Minister
is in the same position as the
President and that transportation
and utilities are also publicly own-
ed in the United States.
The Conservative Party is the
most appropriate political group
in England today, Wilkes said, be-
cause it favors more competition
between various industries.
"However," he added, "the La-
bor Party contributed much to our
country's welfare when it estab-
lished the National Health Ser-
vice, which enables every citizen
to receive free health service."
High Taxes.
Wilkes remarked that England's
main problem today is how to low-
er its taxes. He said there is a
40 per cent tax on all new cars,
which is too high, as are other
items in relation to wages.
Arriving at the University in
September, Wilkes said that he
likes the informality and unre-
servedness of the students as com-
pared to the English.
Sea To Be Theme
Of Smith Exhibit
Mrs. Hubert S. Smith of Bay
City has contributed almost 1000
American historical items on ships
and sailing to the University Cle-
ments Library.
The exhibit, which will be on
display through January, has been
given the title, "Of Sea and Sail."
It includes five biographies of
John Paul Jones and an account.
of the famous sea battle between
Jones and the English ship "Sera-
pis.,"
Also in the collection is a series
of rare books and manuscripts1
covering the career of Admiral
Lord Nelson.
classes when walks are jammed
with students.
The machine's route has been
planned so that in traveling
through the maze of sidewalks it
will retrace its path only on walks
wide enough to necessitate a sec-
ond sweeping by its seven foot
brush.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

SGC Agenda
Student Government Council
will meet at 7:30 p.m. today in
the Union.
The Agenda is as follows:
Officer's Reports.
Administrative Wing report.
Cinema Guild.
Constitutions: 27 Society.
Korean Club.
Campus Affairs Committee:
General Committee Structure.
Town Meeting
YR-YD Coordinating Com-
mittee
Booklet
Athletic Affairs
Human and International
Welfare Committee: Progress
Report. N.E. Minanao Colleges.
Elections Committee.
Activities: Pep Rally
International Students Asso-
ciation-Monte 'Carlo Ball
World University Service --
Fund brive
Old and New Business.

Members and
Time.

ConstituentsI

Tillyard Will
Talk OnBlake
E.M.W. Tillyard, Master of Je-
sus College at Cambridge Uni-
versity will lecture on "Blake and
the Common Reader" at 4:10 to-
morrow in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall.
For the past four weeks Profes-
sor Tillyard has been lecturing at
the Universities of Illinois and
Washington.
He has published many books,
including "The Miltonic Setting
Past and Present," "The English
World Picture," "The English Epic
and its Background," "The Eng-
lish Renaissance: Fact or Fiction?"
and "Shakespeare's History Plays."
He is also the author of various
essays and criticisms of Shake-
speare and other literary figures.
Scholarship Board
Petitioning Open
Petitioning for the Student Ac-
tivities Scholarship Board has
been extended until Wednesday,
Nov. 16.
Seven positions are available.
Petitions may be obtained from
Mrs. Ruth Callahan in the Office
of Student .Affairs, Administra-
tion Bldg.
e- Any Name, Initial, Club or
t Greek Letter Ring in Solid
~'STERLING SILVER
Q Beaut ful rings (up to oletters) cus-
tom designed to your finger size
then handcrafted from a block o
solid sterling silver. $7incudinitax.
Money back guarante.e Ladies ring
is trim and ferninine. Man's ring is
largerheavier. 18-da pp. delivery.
Same ring in gold $45.00. Send exact
ring size,checkorM.O.Freecataiog.
STERLING ARTISTS
BOX 502, IOWA CITY, IOWA

(Continued from Page 4)

City of Dearborn, Dearborn, Mich.-
all levels in Civil and sanitary for
Design. Must be U.S. citizen.
Ethyl Corp., Research and Engrg. Div.,
Detroit, Mich.-all levels in Mech. for
Research.
The Wickes Corp, U.S. Graphite Co.,
Saginaw, Mich.-B.S. in Chem., Elect.,
nd., Mech., & Metal. E. for Research,
Devel., Design, & Prod. U.S. citizen.
Mercier Brick Co., Dearborn, Mich.-
all levels in Civil & Mech. for Prod.,
Construction, and Sales. U.S. citizens.
Raynoier Inc., Olympic Research Div.,
Shelton, Wash.-al levels Chem. E. for
Research, Devel., and Prod.
The Glenn L. Martin Co., Baltimore,
Md.-all levels in Aero, Chem., Civil,
Elect., Instrumentation, Materials,
Mech., Metal., Marine & Naval, Math.,
Engrg. Mech., Physics and Science for
Regular and Summer Research, Develop-
ment, and Design. U.S. citizen.
Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., Brooklyn,
N. Y.-all levels in Chem. E. for Sum-
mer & Regular Devel., and Prod.
Argus Cameras, Inc., Ann Arbor, Mich.
-Elect, with Communications Option,
Ind., Instru., Mech. and Physics for
Research, Devel., and Design.
Bailey Meter Co., Cleveland, Ohio--
B.S. & M.S. in Chem., Elect., Instru.,
Mech., and Nuclear for Research, Devel.,
and Sales.
Mon. and Tues., Nov. 14 and 15
U.S. Gov., U.S. Army, Signal Corps
Engrg. Labs., Ft. Monmouth, N. J. -
all levels in Elect.,. Mech., and Physics
for Research, Devel., and Design. U.S.
citizen.
Tues., Nov. 15
Liquid Carbonic Corp., Chicago, Ill.-
B.S. in Chem. E. for Devel., Design,
Prod., and Construction.
North American Aviation, Inc., Co-
lumbus, Ohio-all levels in Aero., Civil,
Elect., Mech.,, Engrg. Mech., and Nu-
clear; B.S. & M.S. in Metal. for Re-
search, Devel., and Design. U.S. citi-
zens.
U.S. Govt., U.S. Navy, Bureau of
Aeronautics, Washington, D. C.-B.S. &
M.S. in Aero., Civil, Elect., Electronics,
Mech., and Math. for Research, Design,
Devel., and Prod.
Youngstown Sheet and Tube Co.,
Youngstown, Ohio-all levels in Chem.,
Material, Math., Metal., Physics, and

Science; B.S. & M.S. in Civil, Elect.,
Ind., Mech., Engrg. Mech., for Prod.,
Constr., and Sales. U.S. citizens.
Goodyear Aircraft Corp., Akron, Ohio
-all levels in Aero., Civil, Elect., Math.,
Mech., and Physics for Research, Devel.,
Design, and Prod.
Goodyear Atomic Corp., Pike County,
Ohio-all levels in Chem., Elect., Mech.,
Metal., Physics, and Science for Devel.,
Design, and Prod.
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Akron,
Ohio-all levels in Chem., Civil., Elect.,
Ind., dnd Mech. for Research, Devel.,
Design, Prod., and Sales.
G & W Electric specialty Co., Chicago,
Ill.-B.S. in Elect., E., U.S. citizen, for
Research, Devel., Design and Sales
Tues., Wed., Nov. 15 and 16
Standard Oil Co., Cleveland, Ohio-
B.S. & M.S. in Chem., Civil, Elect., Ind.,
Instr., Math., Mech., Science for Regular
andSummer Research, Deve., Design,
Constr., and sales.
Scott Paper Co., Chester, Penn.-all
levels in Chem., Civil, Elect., Ind., In-
stru., Mech., Engrg. Mech. for Research.
American Box Board Co., Grand Rap-
ids, Mich.-all levels in Chem., Mech.,
Engrg. Mech.; B.S. & M.S. in Civil,
Elect., and Ind. for Research. Devel.,
Design, and Constr.
Wed., Nov. 16
State Highway Commission of Wisc.,
Madison, Wisc.-B.S. & M.S. in Civil for
Design and Constr., U.S. citizen.
Consumers Power Co., Jackson, Mich.-
all levels in Civil, Constru., Elect.,
Math., Mech., Engrg. Mech., and Science
for Devel., Design, Prod., Constr., and
Sales.
Joy Mfg. Co., Michigan City, Ind.-
all levels in Elect., Ind., Instru., and
Mech. for Design and Prod.
City of Birmingham, Birmingham,
Mich-all levels in Civil and Municipal
for Design and Construction. Must be
U.S. citizen.
Ohio Oil Co., Research Div., Denver,
Colo.-PhD in Chem., Mech., and Nu-
clear for Research.
Ohio Oil Co., Refining Dept., Robin-
son, I11.-B.S. in Chem. E. for Prod.
Hughes Research & Devel. Labs, Cul-
ver City, Calif.--all levels in Elect.,
Instru., Mech., and Physics for Re-
search, Development, Design, and Prod.,
U.S. citizen.
For appointments contact the Engi-
neering Placement Office, 347 W. Engrg.,
Ext. 2182.

Optometrist Joseph Sasaki
Appointed County Supervisor
Joseph D. Sasaki was appointed
to fill the First Ward vacancy on ice-president of the Ann Arbor-
the Washtenaw County Board of Washtenaw County Council of
Supervisors by Mayor William E. Churches and co-chairman of the
Brown Jr. at Monday's city coun- Republican party in his ward,
cil meeting.Pr-
Mayor Brown described Sasaki as Prof., Mrs. Ogden
a "very loyal Amercai citizen .
who has done a tremendous Write New Book
amount of work for the good of
the community." Prof. Harry V. S. Ogden, of the
The 43-year-old Ann Arbor op- English department, and his wife,
tometrist was named to succeed assistant editor of the Middle
Fitch D. Forsythe who died Oct. English Dictionary, have written
id after serving 20 years on the a book entitled "English Taste in
board. Landscape in the Seventeenth
bard. ACentury."
Sasaki came to Ann Arbor as The book, which has just been
an instructor at the University published by the University Press,
in early 1944 and taught until late deals with the landscape painting
1945. and "nature" poetry of the time.
He belongs to a numer of scien- Prof. Ogden is the author of a
tific, social and service organi- bibliography of the literature of
zations. painting and drawing in 17th-cen-
At the present time he is a tury England.
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. ..INTE RVIEWS
Hamilton Standard Division
United Aircraft Corporation lThursday
Designers and Manufacturers of November 10
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SYSTEMS
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* PROPELLERS
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Engineerlng Staff Continuously Expanded for the
Past 30 Years-end still Growing.
Largest New Jet Aircraft Equipment Development
Prograt In our History,
Local Graduate study Program with R.P.i. Available -
Tuition Assistance.
Modern Plant with Extensive Research Facilities.

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Interviewing on Campus
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11
Celanese, a leader in the expanding fields of chemical fibers,
plastics, and chemicals, can offer outstanding career positions
to qualified graduates. If you will receive a degree in . .
BACHELOR'S, MASTERS, OR DOCTORS
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