100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1955

rAGE ST~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 8.1955

.... ... . .. ..., y W ... r.....a ., > +ry. ..v v.r

RATS GET LUNG CANCER:
Air Pollution Real Danger McCabe Says

Church Designs Shown

By ERNEST THEODOSSIN
Air pollution by industries is one
of the nation's most grave prob-
lems, according to Louis C. Mc-
Cabe.
McCabe, Scientist director of the
sanitary engineering services divi-
sion, United States Public Health
Service, Washington, D.C., es-
pecially emphasized the air pol-
lution problems being faced by'
Los Angeles, Cal., in a speech yes-
terday.
In a study made with rats, in
which the subjects were introduced
to an exact duplication of Los
Angeles air conditions, almost all
of the animals developed lung
cancer.
"The danger is particularly
acute with ozone pollution," he
explained. "For example, when
the concentration gets to 1.5 parts
of ozone per 1,000,000 parts of air,
human life is in danger.
"Thus far, Los Angeles ozone
concentration has at one point
reached a concentration of one."
McCabe added that while the
pollution may not affect healthy
individuals very strongly, with
people having weak hearts or res-
piratory problems, the danger of
death is increased.
Speaking on "Public Health As-
pects of Air Pollution" in the pub-
lid health school auditorium, the
scientist cited the 1952 London,
Eng., atmospheric problem, where
the death rate rose to 4,000 cas-
ualties above normal.

zx tArchttec
Contemporary American church
design is the subject of an exhibit
on the first floor of the College of
Architecture and Design.
The exhibit will be held until
November 25. It is sponsored by
the Bureau of Church Building of
the National Council of Churches
in the U.S.A. and consists of
photographs of recently - built
churches. Some of the architects
whose designs are shown in the
exhibit have won awards in a
contest sponsored by the Church
Architecture Guild of America.
The locations of these churches
include cities and towns ranging
from. Connecticut to Hawaii; and
the designs include traditional
buildings as well as some forms
disregarding traditional concepts,
such as the Shrine of the Angels
at Grand Canyon, Arizona.
Students' Work Exhibited
" The first floor exhibit of con-
temporary churches is only one of
several in the building.
On other floors the work of the
students themselves is on display.
The work of architecture stu-
dents occupies the college's second
floor. This display consists of
public building designs, plans for
neighborhoods and communities,
and projects in city planning and
designing, which now represents
the nearby communities of Saline
and Ypsilanti.

ture Exnbtt
L
The third floor of the college
is devoted to exhibits of design by
students in the Art Department
of the college and features various
clock designs done by upper-class-
men.
Pencil Drawings on Fourth Floor
Introductory problems in art are
illustrated by pencil drawings on
the fourth floor. These drawings
are graphic illustrations of small
subjects, such as a piece of wood
or a fossil, and are lifelike repre-
sentations of the subject matter.
Book cover designs, paintings in
which various media are used, and
charcoal still-lifes complete the
display on the fourth floor of the
college.
Bertolt Brecht
Play To Open
"The Good Woman of Setzuan"
by Bertolt Brecht opens tomorrow
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
at 8 p.m.
Presented by the speech depart-
ment, Brecht's play takes place in
Setzuan, a contemporary Chinese
town. The story is a parable of
human good opposing evil in so-
ciety.
Tickets are on sale in the Lydia
Mendelssohn box o. . ce today

Studenits To Meet
Principals Here
High school principals and their
former students will get together
tomorrow and Thursday when the
University holds its 27th Annual
Principal-Freshman and Junior
College Conference.
Purpose of the Conference, ac-
cording to Chairman Clyde Vro-
man, U-M director of admissions,
is to promote a better understand-
ing of the needs of new students
at the University. This year's
theme is "The Instructional Pro-
gram."

DAILY
OFFICIAL
B ULLE TIN

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
SOCIAL GET-TOGETHER-Scientist Louis C. McCabe converses
with hostess in tea hour preceding his lecture on air pollution.
The Washington, D.C., Science Director cautioned that the
world's atmosphere is fast becoming dangerous for human
habitation.

(Continued from Page 4)
1956: Chemistry; Mathematics; Human-
ities; English; Physical Education;
Science; Drawing; Accounting and Busi-
ness Law; Commercial; Business.
Farmingdale, New York (State Univer-
sity of New York)-Teacher Needs for
February, 1956: Instructor-Electronics.
Rapid City, South Dakota (South Da-
kota School of Mines and Technology)-
Teacher Needs for February, 1956: Elec-
trical Engineer.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Bldg., No 3-1511, Ext. 489.

McCabe polntec out the im-
portance of the problem by adding
that Congress has appropriated
$5,000,000 for the study of air pol-

Recent Cornell Study Shows
Students' Values Unchanged

College students aren't dis-
oriented or confused individuals.
A recent sociological study by
Cornell University finds college
students follow the dominant
values of society and their elders.
The study of the attitudes, goals
and values of more than 7,000 stu-
dents on 12 campuses revealed that
college students adhere to the old-
est and most universal rights con-
cerning their basic human values
and democratic principles.
Questioned on attitudes in the
areas of occupational choice, edu-
cation, religion, courtship and mar-
riage and politics, the survey dis-
pelled support for alarmists who
feel the younger generation is rap-
idly departing from the standards
of their parents.
In occupational choice, students'
believe in choosing a job permitting
them to use their talents rather
than placing first emphasis on
money, status and prestige.
Place For Education
Recognizing the importance of
their opportunity to go to college,
the students felt it was the place
for education. They also felt that
what they were learning in col-
lege was worthwhile. They main-
tained, however, that the criti-
cism against "production - line"
teaching today is justified.
The study showed the tendency
Civil Service
New Civil Service examinations
are scheduled for engineering and
statistical draftsmen.
Written tests aren't required but
applicants must have had ap-
propriate experience or education
and furnish a sample of their
work.
Additional information and ap-
plication forms may be obtained
from post offices or from the U.S.
Civil Service. Commission, Wash-
ington 25, D.C.
FARMER'S
MARKET
Detroit Street
Open Wednesday and Saturday
for
Farm-Fresh Fruits, Vegetables,
Poultry and Eggs

on campuses is toward religion,
with 80 per cent of the samples
feeling the need for religious faith
or philosophy and only one per
cent admitting atheism.
The students valued highly the
fundamental need for the state to
guarantee the traditional demo-
cratic rights. They ranked such
privileges as the individual's right
to protection against illegal search
of his home higher than the privi-
leges which affect his personal
experience, as the right to earn
money and to have a minimum
wage.
Show Conservatism
In matters of dating and mar-
riage, the students were tradi-
tional and conservative. They
,consider dating in college as a
preparation for marriage and feel
children are a necessary basis to
marriage.
The group at Cornell who con-
ducted the study with the aid of
Carnegie Corporation grants for
the past six years, conclude that
students' attitudes coincide with
prevailing public standards.

lution, with about a nalf of the
amount going to scientific research.
"There is at present," McCabe
said, "no definite solution other
than watching the chemical con-
centration of the air."
In tracing the history of air
pollution, the scientist cautioned
that while it is not a new prob-
lem, it has seldom reached the
dangerous points arrived at in the
past few years.
The first record of air pollution
occurs with Pliney the Younger,
in an account of the eruption of
Mt. Vesuvius. But McCabe, in'
paralleling modern times with!
ancient, pointed out that not until
1930 do we have any record of
massive air pollution.
In that year Belgium suffered
a contamination that destroyed
both animal and human lives,
Plant Dangers
He cautioned that air pollution
is not only dangerous to humans,
but that it destroys animal and
vegetable life, the latter being par-
ticularly susceptible to sulfur
dioxide poisoning,
4 Any Name, Initial, Club or
Greek Letter Ring in Solid
STERLING SILVER
Beautiful rings (upto5 letters) s-
tomn designed to your finger size
then handcrafted from a block o
solid stV.,rling silver. $7 including tax.
Money back guarantee. Ladies' ring
is trim and feminine. Man's ring is
larger, heavier. 18-day p. p. delivery.
A Same ring in gold $45.00. Send exact
ring size, check or M.U. Free catalog.
~STRLING ARTISTS
BOX 504, IOWA CITY, IOWA

Experimental Physicists
Nuclear Physicists
Theoretical Physicists
Mathematicians
Metallurgical Engineers

Analytical Chemists
Inorganic Chemists
Physical Chemists
Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers (Electronics)

s
OF THE UN

Summer employment opportunities at the Laboratory are open to
approximately 100 graduate students majoring in various physical
sciences, and undergraduates receiving their degrees next June
who intend to continue their advance studies.
The program provides for well-paid summer work with renowned
scientists in one of the nation's most important and finest
equipped research laboratories.
Summer employees will become familiar with several phases of
vital scientific research and development activity related as closely
as possible to the individual's field of interest. This
experience will enable students to appraise the advantages of a
possible career at the Laboratory.
In addition to interesting work, employees will enjoy delightful
daytime temperatures and blanket-cool nights in a timbered,
mountainous area, only 35 miles from historic old Santa Fe.
Interested students should make immediate inquiry. Completed
applications must be received by the Laboratory not later than
February 1, 1956, in order to allow time for
necessary security clearance. Applicants must
be U. S. citizens.
.aent aMail inquiry to:
$intfc la rtr Department of Scientfi Personnel

Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

lIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO

_ _ __

A l1 A l r i r i r r :'w ..,. . w w' , . a Aft in Ali t r r .rr r 'i

I

-

f ENGINEERS AND

METALLURGISTS

I.

. -, ..'k.... w, as

Hamilton Standard Division
United Aircraft Coprto
Designers and Manufacturers of
JET AIRCRAFT EQUIPMENT
AND PROPELLERS
f JET FUEL CONTROLS
(Electronic & Hydro-Mechanical)
* JET TURBINE STARTERS
(Pneumatic & Combustion)
* HYDRAULIC PUMPS<
(Variable Displacement)
* AIR CONDITIONING
SYSTEMSk
(Air Cycle & Vapor)>
* PROPELLERS {
(for Turbine &
Piston Engines)
* CONTROLS & ACCESSORIES
FOR NUCLEAR ENGINES
Engineering Staff Continuously Expanded for the
Past 30 Years-and Still Growing.
Largest New Jet Aircraft Equipment Development
Program in Our History.
Local Graduate Study Program with R.P.I. Available -
Tuition Assistance.

INTERVIEWS
Thursday
November 10

University of
Southern California
University of Arizona
Tucson
University of California
Los Angeles

To those interested
in advanced academic study
while associated with
important research and development
in industry, Hughes offers
two separate,
practical programs.

HUGHES

COOPERATIVE

FELLOWSHIP

PROGRAM

FOR MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREES

This program is designed to enable outstanding
graduates in Electrical Engineering, Mechanical
Engineering or Physics to obtain the Master of
Science degree while acquiring experience in an
industrial research and development environ-
ment. The program is comprised of full-time
summer employment at Hughes under the guid-
ance of experienced scientists and engineers, and
part-time work at Hughes during the regular
school year arranged to permit the student to
maintain a half-time university schedule of
graduate study.
Tuition, books and fees will be provided by

Hughes. The income provided will enable the
participant to enjoy a reasonable standard of
living while pursuing his advanced studies.
Travel allowances will be made to those living
outside the area.
Applicants must be able to meet the entrance
requirements for graduate study at the University
of California at Los Angeles, the University of
Southern California, or the University of Ari-
zona. Because of the classified nature of the work
at Hughes, applicants must be U. S. citizens for
whom appropriate security clearance can be ob-
tained. As many as I5o awards will be made.

Application forms
and instructions
may be obtained
by writing
to Committee for
Graduate Study.

NOW
Is the time to go to Follett's
Bookstore for the most won-
derful selection of personal
Christmas cords in town. Fifty
lines to choose from. Get the
best-Get them at-
FOLLETT'S
State St. at N. University

4 -. .,!.0.-; .ft 0 * ® 0 * d 0 sf0 4".0ft S *S0 0 k t

THE

HOWARD

F L O WS H I * * * * *
FELLOWS HI PS

* - 0

HUGHES

IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Eligible for these awards are U.S. citizens who
have completed one year of graduate work in
Engineering or Physics and who can qualify for
graduate standing at the California Institute of
Technology for study toward the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy or post-doctoral work.
Each fellowship covers a twelve-month period
which includes a ten-week advanced develop-
inent project carried out during the summer at
Hughes Research & Development Laboratories,
followed by a full-time program of study and
research at California Institute of Technology.
Each appointment provides a cash award of
not less than $2,ooo, a salary of not less than
52,500. lus $1soo for tuition and research ex-

Gold Bond
Cleaners

For application
forms and
complete information,
address
correspondence to the
Howard Hughes
Fellowship Committee.

Modern Plant with Extensive Research Facilities.

1

'

;. ::
..
.::.

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan