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November 06, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TSE MlC GAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOV ER 9, I9

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 6.1955

_. __., ..., ...p.,.... ,, .., ..,....

U' Scientists
tud y Rare
Mood Ills
Two University medical scien-
;ts have devised a method of
covering a rare blood disease in
tients who don't know they are
Ak.
Prof. Walter D. Block and Dr.
'hn Rukavina of the department
dermatology and syphilology
und a family of 66 .people who
)peared to be carriers of the
sease called familial primary
stemic amyloidosis.
While some members of the fam-
7 had already begun to develop
tward symptoms of the disease,
hers did not know or suspect
ey had it. Blood studies revealed
e-clinical symptoms of the di-
ase in children from three to 18
ars of age.
Here were human beings who
ere young on the outside but old
1 the inside. The doctors spec-
ated that by the time these
iildren reached their late twen-
es, they would probably develop
inful hands, diminished vision,,
rhaps even heart ailments.
The principal significance of the
udy is its contribution to the
eld of genetics. According to one
the investigators, the technique
ed in this study demonstrates
at hypothetical or suspected
ses of inherited disease now
ight be confirmed biochemically.

Organization
Notices

11

Congregational-Disciples. Guild: To-.
ight, speaker, Prof. Robert Blood on
Design For Marriage," 7:00 p.m., Con-
regational Church.
* * s
Graduate Outing Club: Meets every
unday at 2:00 p.m., northwest entrance
o Rackham Building. Wear old clothes.
Hillql Foundation: Chorus meeting-_
ehearsals, 7:00 p.m., tonight, Main
hapel, Hillel. New members invited.
Sunday Supper, Club: 6:00 p.m., fol-
wed by record dance, Hillel.
Student Zionist Organization: Meet-
ag, discussion of Zionist philosophers,
:00 p.m., tonight, Hillel.
La Petite Causette: Nov. 7, 3:30-5:00
.m., Rumpus Room, League.
* * *
Le Cercle Francais: Professor Spurlin
ill speak, Nov. 8, 8:00 p.m., League.
Lutheran Student Association: Dedi-
ation recital by Prof. Robert Noehren,
rganist. Tonight, 7:00 p.m., Lutheran
tudent Chapel at Forest and Hill.
* * .
Michigan Christian Fellowship: Lane
all, Reverend Verduin, "Revelation of
od to Man, Jesus. Christ," Campus
-apel, 4:00 p.m., today.
Newman. Club : general. meeting and
ovie, tonight, 7:30 p.m., Newman Club
enter.
Initiation Party: Tonight 7:00 p.m.,
ewman Club Center, all members are
aged to attend.
BRA Polk Dancing: Nov. 7, 7:30-
:00 p.m., Lane Hall recreation room.
program of Italian dances will be
atured beginning at 8:00 p.m. Mem-
ers of Il Circolo Italiano are especially
:Lvited.
Unitarian Student Group: Tonight,
:30 p.m., Dr. Herbert Smith, Chairman
fDramatics at Albion College, will
>eak on "Role Playing Techniques,"
emonstration, Unitarian Church.
* * *
Wesley Guild: "Trip to Albion," semi-
ar in Pine Room--9:30 a.m., supper
t 5:00 p.m. Leave for Albion 5:30 p.m.
Westminister Student Fellowship: To-
ay, 6:45 p.m., Presbyterian Student
enter, topic, "Why Bother."

Bull!
COMACCHIO, Italy (P) - A
rampaging bull stormed into
the soccer field and chased off
the entire red-Jerseyed Co-
macchio team.
After the bull was led away,
blind folded, the Comacchio
eleven came cautiously back and
beat St. Giuseppe, 2-1.
Closed-Circuit
Television Age
Shows Abilities
NEW YORK (AP)-What is it that
watches the baby, catches shop-
lifters, helps the doctor, the
preacher and the teacher, and
even keeps an eye on the gambling
tables in a certain Reno establish-
ment?
Why, television, of course. Clos-
ed-circuit television.
Closed Circuit Age
Rather quietly, with a word here
and a hint there, the closed-circuit
TV age has suddenly descended,
upon us. What is closed-circuit
television? Don't bother with the
technicalities. Just think of the
TV camera as an extension of
human vision, able to perceive and
transmit to selected viewers miles
away or in the. next room scenes
and information that cannot oth-
erwise be readily seen.
Time, Effort, Money
"This is the point," says John
R. Howland. "If I can see in that
other room it's going to save me
time or effort or money."
Howland is general sales man-
ager of a television products in-
corporation, of Michigan City, Ind.,
a major producer and pioneer in
closed-circuit TV. A year ago there
were about 100 such installations
in the country. Today there are
about 1,500. By the end of 1956
there will be 5,000, says Howland.
Accomplishments
Here are not, just some of the
things closed-circuit TV is capable]
of doing. Here are some actual
accomplishments:
Department stores in certain-
cities have installed cameras
which keep an unobtrusive eye on
shoplifters. Banks are using the
system to speed signature verifica-
tion and customer balances be-
tween drive-in tellers' .offices and
centralized accounting divisions,
In hospitals closed-circuit TV
keeps a watchful eye on baby areas,
narcotics cabinets, and even back
doors.°
In a Reno gambling casino
there's a camera installed in a
chandelier to mle sure that the
proper money ends up in the prop-
er pockets.
The Biggest
Litle arnShop nn
in the
State of Mlichigan
has everything for
knitting.
Open 9-5:30 DAILY
Yamcraft Shop
S 10 Nickels Arcade
6or. oe. o'ooe==cr"o

Speech Department To Give
'Good Woman of Setzuan'

Seeing a female lead in a play
is easy enough to accept, but see-
ing her play a male role as well,
adds complication.
In the speech department's next
play "The Good Woman of Set-
zuan" by Berthold Brecht, the
"good woman" Shen Te and the
male "alter ego" she assumes show
the audience the interaction of
good and evil in society.
.The Good Woman of Setzuan"
is a parable in a Chinese setting.
The story .concerns three gods
who come to' earth seeking good-
ness in human beings. They start
their search by looking for some-
one to offer them hospitality for
the night.
The only person who offers them
lodging is Shen Te, a Chinese
prostitute. She later proves to be
the only human being who is
completely good. The gods reward
her with a store and money. The
rest of the story centers around
the people and crises Shen Te
meets.
Brecht, a contemporary German
dramatist experiments with an un-
usual approach in didactic theater.

With speeches to the audience,
witty evchanges, mock naivete and
Chinese conventions, Brecht adds
a new and different tempo and
texture to his theme.
The play is considered to be a
difficult one to produce for mod-
ern audiences. Since the heroine
plays not only herself but her
male cousin, Brecht faces the dan-
ger of creating illusion rather than
truth. However, he treats the
parable as an epic and concentrates
on characterization, without
thrusting pathos or anger on his
audience.
"The Good Woman of Setzuan"
will be presented Wednesday
through Saturday in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater. All seats
are reserved. Tickets will be on
sale in the Lydia Mendelssohn box
office tomorrow and Tuesday from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Wednesday
through Saturday from 10 a.m. to
8 p.m.
Tickets cost $1.50, $1.25 and 90
cents. Student admission is 75
cents Wednesday and Thursday.
' Performances are at 8 p.m.

As Seen in COSMOPOLITAN
- 4

I I

Ship& n Shopre
primitive print,
spicy colors,
stitched front
398 -
On y
" i : " .
^ "rw ti 4 -.
-'

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F0 OR F iN
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IN THE
UNDER-CUP j
DEFINITELY YOURS
e,9e RAS
BY HOLLYWOOD-XAXWELL
Yes, it's the wire . . . supple
and p a d d e d, underscoring
each cup . . . gives you new

1/

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DRESSES-THIRD
THE FASHION FLOOR

..

I I

!.

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