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November 03, 1955 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

nrnm
LIRE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1955

-- -------- M I H G N D A L H R DA , N V M BRL1

Disposal Method Needed
For Radioactive Wastes

,

Peacetime disposal of radioac-
Dr. Shilling asked.

Some of theI

tive waste material is as important
as protection against the effects
of the atomic bomb.
More than 50,000 gallons of
radioactive liquids will be washed
down the drain daily within the
next 45 years, Dr. Charles W.
Shilling, of the Atomic Energy
Commission said yesterday.
"The question is, what drain?"
-N
DIAL NO 2-2513
s 'IA EE T

. . 11111, n r .

I

"Phenix City, Alabama, was
doing a $100,000,000 annual
trade in sin and crime.
EadLI magazine
"The wickedest city in the
United States."
"...a thieves' retreat...a
hoodlums' paradise."

"hotter" isotopes may take 600
years to decay or weaken enough
that they may safely be dumped
into a drinking source.
Dr. Shilling, speaking at the op-'
ening session of a training course
on radioactive liquid wastes, nam-
ed several possible atomic "dumps."
Possible methods for disposing
of radioactive liquid wastes in-
clude putting them in caves, aban-
doned mines, and underground
caverns, as well as burying the
material in sealed containers at
the bottom of the sea.
If the waste is in gas form, it
might be released directly into the
atmosphere. If its intensity is
high, it may be stored for awhile
and later released.
Solids contaminated by radia-
tion may be burned, storing the
ashes until they are safe enough
to dump into streams. The main
method-for disposing of low-in-
tensity radioactive liquids is dump-
ing them directly in streams.'
Dr. Shilling also discussed pos-
sible secondary uses of the discard-
ed material, such as for fuel in
heating homes, for sterilization of
food and drugs, and for treating
diseases in place of the x-ray.
He also estimated that 41 tons
of fission products will be gener-
ated annually by the year 2000.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

I

See It 7/
The whole blistering story
authentically filmed in Alabama
...the way it happened[

'U Architect
Coordinates
Construction
By KEITH DeVRIES
"A job of co-ordination" is what
Lynn W. Fry, '17 A&D, Supervis-
ing Architect of the University,
terms his work.
On a University building project
he acts as intermediary between
outside architects and the school
for which the building is to be
constructed.
After receiving a report from the
school's committee on require-
ments for space and utilities, Fry
and his staff go over the report,
clarifying it where necessary and
altering it wherever budgetary and
other considerations require. The
report as finally cleared is given
to the architects as the basis for
their plans.
From then on Fry works closely
with these architects to make cer-
tain original plans are carried out.
Hardly any of the actual de-
signing of buildings is done in
Fry's office. "We hire architects to
do that work," he says, "not
choosing them like contractors on
the basis of the lowest bid, but on
the basis of experience, type of
architecture specialized in, and
quality of past work."
One of the few restrictions on
the architectual style of build-
ings is that each should "reflect
what is accepted as the best in
present-day architecture." Thus
the buildings on the North Cam-
pus would be much more unified
in design than those on the main
campus if only because many are
being constructed at the same
period.
Fry says, "Plans for landscap-
ing, locations, colors and mater-
ials of buildings will guarantee us
a more homogeneous area no mat-
ter what future designs may be."
He left a private Ann Arbor
firm in 1942 for his present post.
Alec Guiness
Visiting U.S.
HOLLYWOOD (IP)-Alec Guin-
ness, star of delightful English
comedies, is still surprised that so
many people in this country rec-
ognize him.
The 41-year-old Briton is here
on his first Hollywood visit, hav-
ing been lured to play opposite
Grace Kelly in "The Swan." It's no
surprise to Hollywoodians that he
is recognized here, since his films
have been immensely popular.
But to Guinness, a shy, modest
chap, it is amazing.
He said there is some confusion
in the public mind about his films.
Enthusiastic fans attribute every
foreign-made comedy to him. On
location in Asheville, N. C., an
admirer said he was grand in
"Mr. Hulet's Holiday," which
starred Jacques Tati.
The actor, who has performed
"Hamlet" and other classics, said
that he fell into the comedy mold
somewhat by accident.
"It was a coincidence that I hap-
pened to make two comedies in a
row-'Lavendar Hill Mob' and 'The
Man in The White Suit,'" he re-
harked. "Both of them.were popu-
lar in this country. So more fol-
lowed.
"If I hadn't been careful, I

would have been playing nothing
but comedies and would soon be
dead and forgotten. But I have
been stubbord and insist on doing
other things."
Film To Be Shown
The Astronomy Department will
show a color film, "The Story of
Palomar," 8 p.m., Friday in room
2003 Angell Hall.
Prof. Freeman D. Miller of the
Astronomy Department will speak.

Ground Crews Clean Up
After Displays,Games

Not everyone was completelyv
happy over last Saturday's Home-
coming displays.
To the University's grounds de-
partment the displays meant a
Monday spent hauling away the
debris of papier mache and wooden
frames from dormitory lawns.
Similarly the Michigan State
football game, an eagerly awaited
event for many, fails to generate
quite the same enthusiasm for the
grounds department men. As the
weekend draws near, they become
apprehensive of scraping layers of
green paint from class memorials,
recalling previous year's games.
Summer is Busy
Aside from special occasions like
last weekend, summer is the bus-
iest period for the department, ac-
cording to its supervisor, Samuel
H. Wylie. In the summer almost
continuous watering and grass cut-
ting is necessary in the huge areas
under department case. Included
in their work are north and main
campuses, the grounds of all dor-
mitories and the Observatory at
Portage Lake.
Snow removal too is a big pro-
ject in winter, with miles of Uni-
versity walks and streets to be
kept clear.
"While the department is not
currently encumbered by any of
these tremendous jobs there is
little let-up in the work to be
done," Wylie said. Labor is now
being concentrated on planting
and landscaping North Campus
Planting around the Northwood
Apartments is now nearing com-
pletion, while those near the new
Kresge Building has been finished.
Work on Main Campus %
Much of the present work on the
main campus consists of details to
be done before winter. Spring
College I

CLASSIFIEDS

bulbs are already being set out in
the League gardens and women's
dormitories. Shrubbery is getting
its final trimming and dead
branches are being removed befqre
they could become dangerous in
some future storm.
Ski Centers
Expectig
Sports Year
Michigan's 46 ski centers are
expecting their most successful
seasons this year, Michigan's State
Tourist Council of winter sports
reports.
Each year the number of winter
tourists has been increasing. This
year an estimated 400,000 will take
advantage of Michigan's facilities.
To meet demands of the many
winter sports enthusiasts Michi-
gan offers facilities for the ama-
teur and professional alike. Be-
sides skiing opportunities, there
are tobaganning, skating, ice-fish-
ing, and ice-boating facilities.
Various contests will be held
throughout the winter.
This winter many resorts will
feature special "ski week" vaca-
tion plans. Winter visitors will be
able to secure meals, lodging,
equipment and special instruction
in special one-price "package"
winter vacations.
Michigan will introduce three
new ski centers this season to meet
the growing demand. Located in
the lower peninsula, they include
the Au Sable Ranch and Ski Club
near Gaylord, Mio Mountain in
northeast Michigan, Glacier Hills
Ski Club near Bellaire and the
Grand Traverse region.

Roundup

Organization

THE
ALABAMA PULIZER
PRIZE EXPOSE
won by the
Columbus Ledger 1;
Extra
"BUNCO BUSTERS"
Color Cartoon
Sunday
"SUMMERTIME"

S.

Why Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., i
reads The Reader's Digest
.

By TED FRIEDMAN
It has taken nearly a year, but
the Daily Texan has finally un-
covered the real story of the mys-
terious dormitory prowler at the
University of Texas.
Girls at one of the campus dor-
mitories heard radio reports last
November of a patient's escape
from the Austin State Mental Hos-
pital. About 6 p.m. one of the
girls, dressed in levis and a man's
white shirt, wrapped her freshly
washed hair in a bandanna and
went out onto the porch roof to
dry it.
On impulse, she ran across the
roof and tapped on one of the
windows. The girl who was study-
ing at her desk by the window
dropped her book and ran down
the hall screaming "Crazy man!"
The cry soon spread all over the
entire second floor.
The girl on the roof had just
ducked back into her room before
the housemother came running to
quiet the hysterical girls and to
call the police.
* * *.
The coming surge of college en-
rollments is already a problem at
Cornell University, according to
Cornell President Deane W. Ma-
lott.
"If enrollment 'explosion' is a
proper term for what lies ahead,
the fuse is smoldering," Malott told
the university's Board of Trustees.
"It is becoming increasingly evi-
dent that Cornell cannot material-
ly increase in size without dam-
age to our academic standards."
The president stressed the need
for new financial resources to help
relieve these pressures. "Our tui-
tion is high," he said. "Too many
of our students become financial
casualties." Many students who
might have graduated with more
scholarship help do not."
- * *
A driving ban pas been put into
effect for all Freshmen at Colo-
rado University this year.
A study of first year students
indicated that more Freshmen with
cars are on academic probation
than those without.

Notices
Congregational-Disciples Guild: Mid-
week Meditation Vesper, today, 5:00-
5:30 p.m., Douglas Chapel, Congrega-
tional Church.
s * *
Foresters' Club: "Forestry in For-
mosa," illustrated, today, 7:30 p.m.,
2054 N.S. Bldg.
* s s
Hillel Foundation: Administrative
Council meeting, 7:15 p.m., today, Li-
brary, Hiilel.
Friday Evening Sabbath Services:
7:15 p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbatt,
Hillel.
Saturday Morning Sabbath Services:
9:00 a.m., Hilel.
Trip to Detroit to see "The World
of Sholom Aleichem," Nov. 7. For res-
ervations, call NO 2-4129.
S* *
Industrial Relations Club: Today,
7:30 p.m., Mr. Tom Spitler, Director of
Industrial Relations at Argus Cameras
Inc., subject, Labor Relations in a
Non-Union Company," Student Coffee
Lounge, Bus. Ad., Discussion period and
refreshments will follow.
* * *
Inter-House Council: Judiciary con-
ference, Rm. 3-B, Union, 7:30 p.m. All
chairmen of Residence Halls judiciaries
are invited to attend and discuss com-
mon problems.
International Center and Interna-
tional Students' Association: Tea, to-
day, 4:30 to 6:00, International Center.
La Petite Causette: Nov. 4, 3:30-5:00
p.m., Rumpus Room, League.
* * *
Lutheran Student Association: Dr.
Gerhard Lenski continues his discus-
sion on "Science and Religion," today,
7:15 p.m., Lutheran Student Center,
Forest and Hill.
* s s
Modern Dance Club: today, 7:30 p.m.,
Barbour Gym, newcomers welcome.
* * .
Newman Club: Record dance, Ga-
briel Richard Center, Nov. 4, 9:00-12:00.
Old Time Jazz Society: "Jazz In The
Beginning," M. C.-Eugene Gray, Con-
ference Room No. 1, Michigan League,
today at 7:30 p.m.
* * *
Westminister Student Fellowship:
Work Party-painting and sewing, Nov.
4, 8:00 p.m., work will continue
through Saturday, Presbyterian Stu-
dent Center.
Wolverine Honor Guard: Today, 7:30
p.m., 3rd Floor Gym, University High
School.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M Saturday
Phone NO 2-3 241
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Have you found 2 notebooks
and a chem problem book in your
bike? Put in wrong bike about a week
ago. Please call NO 3-1511, ext. 103,
Adriana Cooper. )59A
LOST-Blue framed glasses in blue felt
case. Reward. Phone NO 1-561 Ext.
78. ) 57A
FOR SALE
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
IKOFLEX with 2.8 lens, used $75
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University Phone NO 8-6972
)60B
POLAR BEAR RUG-Red felt lined,
head fully mounted, newly pro-
cessed. $250. Call NO 2-9903. )59B
MEISSNER FMAM Hi-Ft tuner and am-
plifier; Webster Chicago 3-speed
changer, G.E. V. R. Cartage; G.E.
Speaker $175. Phone NO 3-2249. )B-54
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88; Sox,
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )4B
STUDENT ROOM
RUG SPECIAL
9x12 cottons, all colors, priced
on sale now at $29.95
SMITH'S CARPET STORE
207 E. Washington NO 3-5536
5B
COOKED and cleaned select cocktail
shrimp for the party. get-togethers at
Washington Fish Market, 208 E. Wash-
ington, NO 2-2589. Free delivery. )3B
USED CARS
ONE OWNER 1948 ENGLISH AUSTIN;
low petrol consumption; parking
made easy; good tires; heater; $200.
Phone NO 2-4285 after 5:00 P.M. )51N
1936 FORD Tudor-Excellent mechani-
cal condition. $60. Call Tony Trittipo,
NO. 2-2531.
'50 PLYMOUTH 4 door sedan. R & H.
Very good shape. $250. University
Oldsmobile. 907 N. Main St. NO 3-
0507. )47N
'49 FORD CLUB COUPE. Very good
shape. Local owned, $250. University
Oldsmobile, 907 N. Main St. NO 3-
0507. )48N
'51 KAISER, R. & H., Hydramatic.
White sidewalls, 2-tone, car is in
very good condition. $145. University
Oldsmobile. 907 N. Main St. NO 3-
0507. )49N
47 HUDSON. Excellent shape. Best of-
fer. NO 2-2076. )44N
USED CARS
ONE OWNER CAR, excellent motor and
tires. R&H & Spot. $75. Bud Twin-
ing's Gas Station, Packard and Hill.
)40N
49 CHEV. 2 door, black. R&H. Sharp.
$295.00. University Oldsmobile, 907 N.
Main St. NO 3-0507. )N
1949 FORD Tudor, six-cylinder, good
condition, 90 W. Joy Rd. Call NO
2-2664. )25N
'49 OLDS, Super, 8, cream convertible.
Red leather seats, hydramatic, ra-
dio, heater, new top, white wals.
$350. Call after 6:30, NO 3-1279. )19N
1949 .OLDSMOBILE Super 88 sedan, ra-
dio, heater, hydramatic. $350: 1950
Ford Convertible, new tires, new top,
beautiful condition, priced right.
"You get a better deal" at Fitzgerald
Jordan, Inc., 607 Detroit Street. NO
8-8141. )2N
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED TO BUY-Boy's used Ight-
weight bike. Call 29682 between 6 &
8 P.M. )K
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - Thesis, Term papers, etc.
Reasonable rates, prompt service.
830 South Main. NO 8-7590. )15J
TYPING - Thesis, Term papers, etc.

Reasonable rates, prompt service. 830
South Main, NO 8-7590. )15J
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)4J
PROFESSIONALS - Improve your
speaking ability. Individual and class
training. Phone NO 3-1531, Ext. 296.
WOMEN students interested in voice
lessons call NO 3-8075. )14J
WASHINGS--Also ironings privately.
Specializing in cotton dresses. Free
pick up and delivery. Phone NO 2-
9020. )9J
RICHARD MADDY-VIOLINMAKER
Fine, old certified instruments &
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )2J

BUSINESS SERVICES
HI-FI Components and Service Audio-
phile, net prices. Telefunken Hi-F,
AM-FM shortwave radios. Service on
all makes of radios and phonographs.
Ann Arbor Radio and TV, 1217 S.
University. Phone NO 8-7942. 1%
blocks east of East Eng. )1J
SERVICE SHOP, 1217 S.A. Studio. 1317
S. Univ. )1J
PERSONAL
CHEERLEADERS looking for tarpaulin
with "MICHIGAN" used at Minn. -
for Illinois game. Owner call NO 3-
2060 PRONTO! )F
TIME TIME TIME TIME
6c 6c 6c 6c
LIFE LIFE LIFE LIFE
8c 8c sc 8
Student Periodical NO 2-3061 )36F
REPRESENTATIVES of Easterling Co.
Inc., will be conducting interviews on
Oct. 10 from 8:30 A.M.-12:00 noon in
Room 38 at Michigan Union. Those
interested in careers and opportuni-
ties in sales; and in local sales ex-
perience are invited to apply in per-
son. )39F
SAY HAPPY BIRTHDAY the different
way. Send friendly greetings to
friends by advertising in the MICH-
IGAN DAILY CLA SSIFIED Section.
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVER NIGHT GUESTS-large pleasant
sleeping room. Twin-beds-next to
tie bath. Call evenings, NO 8-7493.
Clip and save for future use. )4D
HELP WANTED
MALE OR FEMALE salespeople to work
in Ypsi. jewelry store and gift shop.
Must have sales experience. Green
Jewelers. Ypsi. 1679. )37H
WITNESSES WANTED - Make money
for Christmas. Improve your speech.
Very few opportunities remaining. No
lawyers need apply. Standard fees
paid. Don't delay. Visit, write or
call. )40H
STUDENT WANTED to wash breakfast
dishes. Hours 10-12 a.m. Pay - meals.
Call Steward at NO 2-4410. )39H
KITCHEN HELP wanted. Two people
for Fraternity. Call NO 2-5649. )38H
HELP WANTED-Food Service helpers.
Meal jobs available now. Apply Mich-
igan League. )35H
MIHIGAN UNION
NIGHT CLERK - AUDITOR
1 A.M. to 8 A.M., Six nights per week.
Apply at Manager's Office )31H
WANTED-Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call. NO 2-3241.
)29H
SECRETARY
National headquarters of college or-
ganization located at 1705 Washtenaw
has peranent opening for full-time
secretary. 35-hour week Especially
desirable for one who seeks the quiet
and freedom of a small office. Salary
commensurate with experience and
ability. For appointment call NO
3-4617 days, and 2-1424 evenings. )33H
FULL TIME fully experienced men's
clothing salesman. Good starting sal-
ary plus commission plan. Apply
Dixie Shop. 125 W. Michigan Ave.,
Ypsilanti. )34H
PART-TIME HELP. 20 to 25 Hours
Weekly. Porter Work. Phone NO 2-
5614. Afternoons or evenings. )36H
OPPORTUNITY to live near campus*
with young family for girl who will
help evenings. Private room. Phone
NO 2.7040. )19H
CAR HOPS wanted to work nights 5
to 1, good pay, meals, uniforms, and
transportation home furnished; full
or part time. 18 years or over. Milk
Maid Drive in Restaurant. 3730 Wash
tenaw. NO 8-7146. )16N
WANTED-cab drivers. Full or part
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley, Ann Arbor
Yellow and Checker Cab Company,
phone NO 8-9382. )6H
GOLF
FALL SPECIALS
Regular $8.00 irons $3.77
Regular $12.00 woods $5.99
Play Golf Now. Course Open Thru
November.
Scenic Municipal Golf Course
1519 Fuller Rd. near North Campus
)28

CKARSH. OTTAWA
"Iam told that the Digest is now published in 12 languages,
and bought each month by more than 18 million people. By
strengthening understanding among individuals, the Digest
helps people of many different nations to share their ex-
periences and ideals. That is why I,for one, read the Digest
-and why I believe it helps create the conditions of world
peace which we all seek."- From a statement in November
Reader's Digest by the U.S. Representative to the United Nations.

Extra
"GOOD DEED DALEY"
CinemaScope Terrytune
Friday
"GENTLEMEN
MARRY BRUNETTES"

Read,
Daily
C lass ifieds

I

71I

In November Reader's
Digest don't miss:
26-PAGE CONDENSATION FROM $3.50 BEST-SELLER:
"CAPTAIN DREYFUS." "The Dreyfus Affair," in
which France branded an innocent man a traitor,
is perhaps the most celebrated miscarriage of jus-
tice in modern times. Here- in all its relentless 2
drama-is the story of the hysteria-ridden case
that placed a man, a nation and the very concept a
of justice itself on trial.
THE MAKING OF A WEST POINTER. A visit to the
United States Military Academy, where "they
give you a million-dollar education free-and jam
it down your throat nickel by nickel."
WHY WOMEN ACT THAT WAY. They are clumsy at
pitching and running,(their bones aren't built
like men's). But they stand cold better than men;
hear better, too-and change their minds just half
e as often! Scientific facts behind female behavior.

TONIGHT AT 8
isept L '( peech P,'e eh t4
FIRST LAB PLAYBILL
Rostand's comedy
"THE ROMANCERS"
..
Chekhov's Farce
"THE PROPOSAL"
inal Act from V erdi's Opera
"Al DA"
In Italian
,iru ,,uc crun.u e ,, e

RAMAW
A EMMR
f

11

Jean Anouilh's
THIEVES'
CARNIVAL

_. _. _ _ ..._ _. _. _. __. - -. _... _. A . _. _. _. _. _. ._.

A

P

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4Cinema quiW."

11

FINAL WEEK
Matinee Sunday, Nov. 6

Thursday and Friday at 7 and 9
RENE CLAIR'S
"I MARRIED A WITCH"
{ with

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