100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1955 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER2, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACE TIMEE

PAGE THREE

4

Phi(
Wolverine
l Notes
Injuries have hit Michigan
again.
Latest additions to the season
long list are the Wolverines' top
two tailbacks, Terry Barr and Jim
Pace. Both are hobbling around
the practice field because of ankle
sprains . . . Pace received his in
t the Iowa game, running back a
punt. He wasn't able to run on the
ankle in practice earlier this week
Barr's condition isn't quite
as bad as that of Pace. '
Ed Shannon will miss practices
until later this week due to the
death of his mother. Shannon will
attend the funeral today at Chi-
By The Associated Press -

lams

Upset

SAM,

12-6

SIEIEDS

a

Phi Delis Top Lambda Ch*
DU Shuts Out Theta Delts

By JIM THURMAN
The quarter finals of the social
fraternity first place playoffs
found Phi Gamma Delta upsetting
Sigma Alpha Mu, 12 to 6 and Phi
Delta Theta downing Pi Lambda
Phi, 14 to 2.
All five of the games played at
South Ferry Field yesterday took
on appearances of slap-stick-com-
edies. The field was literally a sea
of mud and the players slipped,
stumbled, fell and slid through
their motions. The Alpha Tau
Omega-Sigma Chi was the only
game postponed.
A gambling Phi Gam squad and
a cautious Sammie team played to
a muddy standstill until late in
the first half. It was then that
Phi Gamma Delta's passer, Jack
Wheeler dropped back and threw
long to Gene Honeyman who gath-
ered it in and slid into the end
zone. The try for point was no

"ONE OF THE BEST guards I've ever coached," is the way Jack
Blott describes junior Dick Hill. The chunky 195 pounder has
anchored the right side of Michigan's line for two years with a
tremendous consistency of play that often time borders on the
brilliant.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16..
17.
18.
19.

Team W L
Maryland 7-0
Oklahoma 6-0
Michigan 6-04
Mich. State 5-1
UCLA 6-1
Notre Dame 5-1
West Virginia 6-0
Georgia Tech 6-1
Navy 5-1
Tex. Christian 6-1
Ohio State 4-2
Texas A&M 5-1-1
Miami, Ohio 6-0
Auburn 4-1-1
Mississippi 6-1
Southern Cal 5-2
Kentucky 4-2-1
Syracuse 3-2
Army 4-2

F'
74
54
63
7
3
1
16

2

Total
1884
1852
1774
1312
1213
1207
869
597
305
282
161
135
91
79
70
35
29
27
23
20

r

'I

pnrbe'e.. .

DICK HILL

I

I,,

20. Mississippi St. 6-1

cago, but is expected to be ready to
Saturday.
Two Michigan football alumni,
Ted Topo' and Lowell Perry, are
in the news again . . . Topor, a
linebacker on the 1952 team, sign-
ed with the Detroit Lions to re-
place Jim Ricca who was put on
the waiver list... Perry, who
holds two Michigan pass catching
records, was named by the Wash-
ington Post and Times Herald as
the outstanding service player of
the week after sparking the Boll-
ing Air Force Base team to a 42-7
victory over Fort Monmouth.

By DAVE GREY
Dick Hillris probably one of the
most underrated linemen in the
country today.
The husky junior has been de-
scribed by Line Coach Jack Blott
as "the best guard" he has ever
coached. And Blott has been turn-
ing out top linemen for over 25
years. This would place Hill in a
class with Dominic Tomasi and,
other greats of the Michigan cen-
ter forward walls.
What qualities make outstand-
ing football players like Hill?
All-Around Guard
Few linemen are as consistently
tough on both offense and defense
as the 5'10", 195-pounder. Hill is
fast, quick in his reflexes, and a
"true fighter."
For two years on kick-offs alone,
Number 69 has usually been the
first man down field. His speed
makes him a great asset in draw-
ing out of the line to lead inter-
ference. He is one of the sharpest
blockers on the team.

good but at the time it seemed
unimportant. One touchdown gains
enormous size on a dark, rain
filled afternoon such as yesterday.
SAM Scores
The Sammies took advantage of
a loose Phi aerial in the second
half and put together a drive, the
climax coming in the form of a
pass, from Warren Wertheimer to
Hal Barrett, for six points. The
try for point was no good.
With four minutes remaining the
game broke open. Wheeler took a
Sigma Alpha Mu punt on his ten
yard line, and behind beautiful
down-field blocking, raced down
the sidelines for the winning score.
Sigma Alpha Mu, champions for
the past two I-M fraternity foot-
ball seasons, have finally had their
crown taken away from them.
George Rich passed the Phi
Delts into the finals as they drop-
ped Pi Lambda Phi from the ranks
of the unbeaten. Rich threw for
both of the Phi Delt's touchdowns,
hitting Dick Little and John Sayles
for the tallies. The Phi Delts took
their lead early and were never
in any real danger.
Pi Lam's Get Two
Barry Joseph scored Pi Lambda
Phi's two points by trapping Rich
behind his goal line for a safety.
Delta Upsilon shut out Theta
Delta Chi in the second place play
off, 13-0. Art Wible opened the
scoring for the DU's when he re-
ceived a Theta Delt punt and re-
turned it forty yards for a touch-
Boxing class will start at
7:30 tonight at the Sports
Building.
--Earl Riskey
down. The second score came when
Jim Sergeson passed to Bob Adams
in the end zone.
Dick Stevenson threw three
touchdown passes and caught an-
other ashe lead Phi Kappa Tau
to a 26-13 win over Tau Kappa
Epsilon. Stevenson pitched to Dale
Baker, Paul Thibault and Tom
Mazanec for scores ald received
a pass from Mazanec for the
fourth. The Tekes' touchdowns
were scored by Ron Sandilands
and Bruce Clemenz.
Sigma Nu won over Phi Kappa
Sigma via the forfeit route and
the game between Sigma Chi and
Alpha Tau Omega was postponed.

With careful observation, one#
will notice that Hill is defensively
in or near almost every play. Blott
again rates him as one of the top
defensive guards he has ever seen.
As the ball is snapped from center,
one can see- Hill charging low to
the ground and applying defensive
pressure through the middle.
Few Tackles Possible
Michigan's defensive alignment
is not conducive for the center of
the line to make many tackles, and
this might be one explanation of
why Hill is as overshadowed as he
is. Iowa, for example, ran few
plays through center or to the left
last Saturday. When they did, the
deadly pair of Hill and Al Sigman
stopped the backs cold.
Opponents have learned to stay
away from the right side of the
Michigan defensive line.
Hill has also been described as a
player with a "great heart." He
plays a hard-driving game every
minute on the field, and his pres-
ence can't help but be felt. He will
even admit himself that he some-
times does as much running as a
backfield man.
Hill came to Michigan after

making second team All-State
while playing for Tolleston High
School in Gary, Ind. Football has
always been his major sport inter-
est. As a sophomore last year, his
devotion to the game earned him
almost 220 minutes of game action
-an "almost unheard of" high
figure for a first-year lineman.
Noteworthy in the 21-year-old's
history is his ability to avoid in-
jury. Hill claims that he has been
"pretty lucky," but a good part of
his success can be attributed to
fine conditioning and being thor-
oughly familiar with fundamentals
of the game. A temporary back in-
jury early in high school has been
the only slowing factor of his
career.
Hill canbe spotted easily from
the grandstand by two secondary
means. First, he is usually "on the
go" all the time. Secondly, he is
one of the few players on the team
who still prefers the old-style,
snug-fitting leather helmet to the
more-modern plastic head protec-
tion.
Hill is respected by his team-
mates as being one of the "nicest
guys" on the team and also one
of the very best.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Have you found 2 notebooks
and a chem problem book in your
bike? Put in wrong bike about a week
ago. Please call NO 3-1511, ext. 103,
Adriana Cooper. )59A
LOST-Shaeffer pen -- blue with gold
band. Please call Jerrie Gross at NO
3-1522, ext. 104. )60A
LOST-Blue framed glasses in blue felt
case. Reward. Phone NO 1-561 Ext.
78. )57A
STRAYED Boxer pup, 1% yrs., male,
brown, reported to have played entire
third quarter Iowa game, loves col-
lege b'oys, I want him back Please.
NO 2-6230 Evenings, NO 3-1511 Ext.
261, Mrs. Carlos Lopez. )58A
FOR SALE
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
IKOFLEX with 2.8 lens, used $75
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University Phone NO 8-6972
)60B
POLAR BEAR RUG-Red felt lined,
head fully mounted, newly pro-
cessed. $250. Call NO 2-9903. )59B
MEISSNER FMAM Hi-Fi tuner and am-
plifier; Webster Chicago 3-speed
changer, G.E. V. R. Cartage; G.E.
Speaker $175. Phone NO 3-2249. )B-54
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords6.88; Sox,
39c; Shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )4B
STUDENT ROOM
RUG SPECIAL
9x12 cottons, all colors, priced
on sale now at $29.95
SMITH'S CARPET STORE
207 E. Washington NO 3-5536
)53
COOKED and cleaned select cocktail
shrimp for the party, get-togethers at
Washington Fish Market, 208 E. Wash-
ington, NO 2-2589. Free delivery. )3B
USED CARS
ONE OWNER 1948 ENGLISH AUSTIN;
low petrol consumption; parking
made easy; good tires; heater; $200.
Phone NO 2-4285 after 5:00 P.M. )51N
1936 FORD Tudor-Excellent mechani-
cal condition. $60. Call Tony Trittipo,
NO. 2-2531.
'50 PLYMOUTH 4 door sedan. R & H.
Very good shape. $250. University
Oldsmobile. 907 N. Main St. NO 3-
0507. )47N
'49 FORD CLUB COUPE. Very, good
shape. Local owned, $250. University
Oldsmobile 907 N. Main St. NO 3-
0507. )48N
'51 KAISER, R. & H., Hydramatic.
White sidewalls, 2-tone, car is in
very good condition. $145. University
Oldsmobile. 907 N. Main St. NO 3-
0507. )49N
47 HUDSON. Excellent shape. Best of-
fer. NO 2-2076. )44N

USED CARS
ONE OWNER CAR, excellent motor and
tires. R&H & Spot. $75. Bud Twin-
ing's Gas Station, Packard and Hill.
)40N
49 CHEV. 2 door, black. R&H. Sharp.
$295.00. University Oldsmobile, 907 N.
Main 8t. NO 3-0507. )N
1949 FORD Tudor, six-cylinder, good
condition, 90 W. Joy Rd. Call NO
2-2664. )25N
'49 OLDS, Super 88, cream convertible.
Red leather seats, hydramatic, ra-
dio, heater, new top, white walls.
$350. Call after 6:30, NO 3-1279. )19N
1949 OLDSMOBILE Super 88 sedan, ra-
dio, heater, hydramatic, $350: 1950
Ford Convertible, new tires, new top,
beautiful condition, priced right.
"You get a better deal" at Fitzgerald
Jordan, Inc., 607 Detroit Street. NO
8-8141. )2N
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED TO BUY-Boy's used light-
weight bike. Call 29682 between 6 &
8 P.M. )1K
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING' - Thesis, Term papers, etc.
Reasonable rates, prompt service.
830 South Main. NO 8-7590. )15J
TYPING -- Thesis, Term papers, etc.
Reasonable rates, prompt service. 836
South Main, NO 8-7590. )15J
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)4J
PROFESSIONALS -- Improve your
speaking ability. Individual and class
training. Phone NO 3-1531, Ext. 296.
WOMEN students interested in voice
lessons call NO 3-8075. )14J
WASHINGS-Alsio ironings privately.
Specializing in cotton dresses. Free
pick up and delivery. Phone NO 2-
9020. )9J
HI-FI Components and Service Audio-
phile, net prices. Telefunken Hi-Fi,
AM-FM shortwave radios. Service on
all makes of radios and phonographs.
Ann Arbor Radio and TV, 1217 S.
University. Phone NO 8-7942. 1%
blocks east of East Eng. )lJ
SERVICE SHOP. 1217 S.A. Studio. 1317
S. Univ. )1J
RICHARD MADDY-VIOLINMAKER
Fine, old certified instruments &
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )2J
PERSONAL
NOVEMBER brings specials to Good
Housekeeping, Hi-Fidelity, Popular
Mechanics, in addition to our regs:
Time, Life, Reporter, Fortune, Sports
Ill, Sat Eve Post, US News, News-
week, Nation, New Republic, and La-
dies Home Jr. Student Periodical
NO 2-3061. )37F
REPRESENTATIVES of Easterling Co.
Inc., will be conducting interviews on
Oct. 10 from 8:30 A.M.-12:00 noon in
Room 38 at Michigan Union. Those
interested in careers and opportuni-
ties in sales; and in local sales ex-
perience are invited to apply in per-
son. )39F
SAY HAPPY BIRTHDAY the different
way. Send friendly greetings to
friends by advertising in the MICH.
IGAN DAILY CLISSIFIED Sedtion.
HELP WANTED '
HELP WANTED-Food Service helpers.
Meal jobs available now. Apply Mich-
igan League. )35H

HELP WANTED
MICHIGAN UNION
NIGHT CLERK - AUDITOR
1 A.M. to 8 A.M., Six nights per Week.
Apply at Manager's Office )31H
WANTED-Carriers for the Michigan
Daily Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call. NO 2-3241.
)29H
SECRETARY
National headquarters of college or-
ganization located at 1705 Washtenaw
has peranent opening for full-time
secretary. 35-hour week. Especially
desirable for one who seeks the quiet
and freedom of a small office. Salary
commensurate with experience and
ability. For appointment call NO
3-4617 days, and 2-1424 evenings. )33H
FULL TIME fully experienced men's
clothing salesman. Good starting sal-
ary plus commission plan. Apply
Dixie Shop. 125 W. Michigan Ave.,
Ypsilanti. )34H
PART-TIME HELP. 20 to 25 Hours
Weekly. Porter Work. Phone NO 2-
5614. Afternoons or evenings. )36H
OPPORTUNITY to live near campus
with young family for girl who will
help evenings. Private room. Phone
NO 2-1040. )19H
CAR HOPS wanted to work nights 5
to 1, good pay, meals, uniforms, and
transportation home furnished; full
or part time. 18 years or over. Milk
Maid Drive In '3estaurant. 3730 Wash-
tenaw. NO 8-7146. )16N
WANTED--cab drivers. Full or par
time. Apply 113 S. Ashley, Ann Arbor
Yellow and Checker Cab Company,
phone NO 8-9382. OnH
GOLF
FALL SPECIALS
Regular $8.00 irons $3.77
Regular $12.00 woods $5.99
Play Golf Now. Course Open Thru
November.
Scenic Municipal Golf Course
1519 Fuller Rd. near North Campus
)2 A
HIGH WAY ZOO-

U

TO DAYICIU

Dial NO 2-2513
for program
information

BROWNS IN FIRST PLACE ALONE:
Bears Climb As They Whip Rams

The OCTOPUS
This is the busy boy who is alway.
reaching for something whilehedrive
-the car roof, a cigarette, the lighter;
the road map, the coat on the back
seat, the popcorn bag and, at times,
even the steering wheel. This big Iji
U all arms, qnd needs morq.
WAVONAL, SAFIY O&ItM
DIAL NO 2-3136
From half a world away

By JIM BAAD
The Chicago Bears are definitely
on the move and the Cleveland
Browns are settling into their
customary first place position that
they seem to enjoy every year.
These are the outstanding ob-
servations that can be drawn from
last weekends games.
The Bears, meeting their biggest
test since they started winning
three weeks ago, crushed the first
place Los Angeles Rams, 31-20.
This definitely makes Chicago a
possible title contender despite its
late start as they have lost only
one more game than the Rams,
and will get another crack at Los
Angeles later in the season. '
Colts, Rams Tied
The loss also knocked Los An-
geles from the, undisputed right

to first place that it enjoyed last
week. They are now tied with the
Baltimore Colts, who conquered
Green Bay Saturday night, 14-10.
The Colts now have a 4-2 record
at the season's half-way point and
have definitely proved themselves
a top notch team-not the celler
dweller they were supposed to have
been.
The Cleveland Browns are about
the only team who has refused to
break tradition. They were sup-
posed to win this year, and
throughout the scramble of upsets
and fallen powers, the Browns
have been steadily winning. Con-
sequently, after wrapping up their
fifth victory of the year, edging
the Chicago Cardinals, 26-20, they
find themselves now in their old,
comfortable position at the top of
the Eastern Division heap.

The Pittsburgh Steelers, tied
with Cleveland a week ago, left
the Browns by themselves due to
a surprising 24-0 trouncing by the
Philadelphia Eagles.
Offensive Power Shown
The San Francisco 49ers and
the New York Giants each put
on a great show of offensive power
as the 49ers whipped the winless
Detroit Lions, 38-21, and the
Giants snowed under Washington's
Redskins, 35-7.
The Lion line opened up like a
seive to the San Francisco backs,
pointing very vividly to what is
wrong with the Lions this year.
Y. A. Tittle ran his halfbacks and
fullback on play after play through
the center of the Detroit line.
The Lions' troubles seem to lie
in no Les Bingaman and no Thur-
man McGraw, not in a weakened
offense.
New York again put on an offen-
sive surge, as it did two weeks ago,
but these have been the only two
games in which they could come
up with any of their forecasted
power. Having lost four games
already, their chances for a title
bid are exceedingly weak.
Games to especially watch for
next weekend are Green Bay at
Chicago and San Francisco at
Los Angeles. A Chicago win,
which is more than probable, and
a Los Angeles loss, which is just a
little probable, would throw the
Western Division into another big
tie and put Chicago in the best of
positions to move ahead.

CRESCO'S

..

DISTINCTIVE NEW
HORIZONTAL

THE

CORDUROY
~w

Velvety corduroy
ribs run around in
the smartest circles
- horizontally in-
stead of vertically.
Different ..e. smart
* . . good-looking!
In eight handsome
new colors. Mix-
match this hand-
some CRESCO cas-
ual coat with several
slacks and you'll
have a whole ward-
r o b e of different
outfits at a modest
price. $1750

We Pay CASH
For What You
Know!

1

You can earn from $25 to $1000
just for what you already know.
AMERICAN YOUTH ABROAD, one
of the largest low-cost student
travel services is now offering an
amazing opportunity for an alert
student who likes money.
There's no selling involved. All
you do is send AYA names of stu-

i

I

I

I -~ I I

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan