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October 26, 1955 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-10-26

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six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1955

SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1955

Gremlins?
NEW YORK (A')-The case of
the shifting mail box has post
office inspectors working over-
time.
The box, designed to accept
parcels as well as mail, is sta-
tioned at the southeast corner
of 10th Ave. and 50th St.
But somehow each night
from Oct. 14 to 19 it got over
to the southwest corner, and
two. sturdy mailen had to lug
it back. There has been no
movement since inspectors be-
gan watching from a secret
vantage point.
Program For
SGC Tryouts
Starts Today
Students interested in working
on Student Government Council's
Administrative Wing will meet at
4:15 p.m. today in Rm. 3F in the
Union.
Students will sign up for a two-
week orientation program for try-
outs. During this period the
structure of student government,
'hat it expects to do and what
the tryout can contribute to it will
be discussed.
Wing members will be placed on
the committee of their choice fol-
lowing the orientation program.
They have their choice of the
Council's three ,standing commit-
tees: Public Relations Committee,
Campus Affairs Committee and
the Human and International Wel-
fare Committee.
Wing members also help with
research projects, office work and
have the opportunity of working
up to top positions in any of these
fields.
In accordance with the new
structure of the Wing, students
may advance to subcommittee
chairmen after working as com-
mittee members, and then be eli-
gible for appointment to one of
the four chairmanships: wing co-
ordinator, personnel director, ori-
entation director and office mana-
ger. These positions are appointed
by the SGC Executive Committee
with the approval of the Coun-
cil.
Everyone is invited to attend
the tryout meeting. SGC presi-
dent Hank Berliner, '56, will be
present to outline SGC's actions
for the coming year and to answer
any questions. Also on hand will
be Public Relations Committee
schairman Bill Adams, '57; Campus
Affairs Committee chairman Joel
Tauber, '57; and Humani and In-
ternational Welfare Committee
Chalrman Bob Leacock, '57.
Miss Greer
To Appear
Frances Greer of the School of
Music will give a faculty recital at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Miss Greer will begin her pro-
gram by singing several songs of
the 18th century, and Mozart's
"Rondo, Al desio."
She will sing as the highlight of
the evening, Falla's "Seven Popu-
lar Spanish Songs" which display
Palla's concern with the tradition-
al Spanish folk idiom, and which
stem from ancient Moorish and
oriental sources.
' Miss Greer will also sing several
Debussy songs and other selections
by Gliere, Sargent, and Worta.
Formerly leading soprano with
the Philadelphia Opera Company

and the Metropolitan Opera, Miss
Greer has done considerable con-
cert work on personal tours and as
9 soloist with leading symphony
orchestras in this country.
'U' Accident Victim
In 'Fair' Condition
John T. Fawcett, one of the
three University students involved
in an automobile accident just
outside Grand Rapids Friday is
reported in "fair" condition at
Butterworth Hospital.
David Tietsort, 20 years old, of
Muskegon, lost his life as the car
hit an embankment just outside
'Grand Rapids on US-16.
Released from the hospital ear-
lier today was James W. Church,
18 years old, of Muskegon.
The three were on their way
home for the weekend.
We Pay CASH
For What You
Know!
You can earn from $25 to $1000
just for 'what you already know.
AMERICAN YOUTH ABROAD, one
of the largest low-cost student
travel services is now offering an
amazing opportunity for an alert
student who likes money.
There's no selling involved. All

SGC Duties
To le Told
To Trainees
By BILL HANEY
Student Government Council
will begin its program for training
candidates for SGC tomorrow.
Seventeen candidates will be
prepared to fill the nine seats open
on SGC.
In speaking of the purpose of
the training program, Larry Char-
boos, '57 BAd, publicity chairman,
said, "Because of the extended
area that SGC encompasses it
seems not only desirable but neces-
sary that all candidates have a
better than average knowledge of
operation, functions and purposes
of SGC."
The major part of the training
revolves around four special meet-
ings and attendance of SGC meet-
ings.
Meeting Tomorrow
The first meeting is at 4 p.m.
tomorrow in the Quonset Hut A.
SGC officials and members will
explain the principles of individual
election campaigns, election rules,
and parliamentary procedure.
The second meeting, scheduled
for Oct. 31, will feature SGC presi-
dent Hank Berliner, '56, who will
talk on the relationship of SGC to
the rest of the campus and the
history of SGC and its predeces-
sor, Student Legislature.
When asked his conception of
the system of candidate training,
Berliner said, "the candidate
training program is designed to
acquaint the potential SC mem-
bers with the basic principles of
student government.
'Candidates Must Understand'
"The candidates must under-
stand what student government
is, not only to conduct an intelli-
gent campaign, but to be a full
contributing member of the coun-
cil.
"First we will try to answer the
question: Why does student gov-
ernment exist?
"Second, we shall attempt to
outline the objectives of student
government at Michigan, discuss-
ing SGC's position in relation to
other campus organizations.
"Finally we will try to acquaint
candidates with how SGC is at-
tempting to achieve its objectives.
"A successful candidate training
program will insure qualified SGC
members, an intelligent campaign,
and an informed campus."
The third special meeting will
be an open forum Nov. 1 with
Dick Good, '56, SGC treasurer,
acting as moderator.
Daily Questionnaire
Good said he intends to use
questions from The Daily Ques-
tionnaire to sound out the ideas
of the candidates on the import-
ant issues of the day.
Good mentioned the purpose of
the meeting was not just to see
how aware the trainees are of
what is going on around campus,
but to give them experience at
taking over a discussion, handling
it in an orderly fashion and at the
same time express clearly what-
ever opinions they have.
The fourth and final candidate
meeting is scheduled for Nov. 2.
The topic for discussion will be
the Administrative Wing of SGC.
The purpose and structure of
the Wing and SGC's memberships
in such organizations as the Na-
tional Student Association will be
discussed.
Candidates will also be required
to attend one regular meeting of

SGC.
Publicity chairman Charboos
pointed out that incumbents are
not required to take part in the
candidate training program.
'U' Student Guest
On Ann Arbor TV
Helena Szatkiewicz, '57, will be
the guest of speech department
television on "Dateline Ann Arbor"
at 6:45 p.m. today, over WPAG,
Channel 20.
Miss Szatkiewicz will explain how
her travels helped her to become
proficient in seven languages.
John Reed, publicity chairman
for the United Church Canvas,
will also speak on activities of the
Protestant Churches in Ann Ar-
bor.

FLY OR DRIVE?
Veteran Now Constructing
Combination Auto-Plane

POSITIONS OPEN:
SGC Aids Campus Life

v.

e

SAN DIEGO, CALIF. ()-A pri-
vate plane designed to operate off
land or water-or be driven like
an ordinary automobile-is being
built here by a World War II
Marine flier who was the first man
to test the Navy's vertical takeoff
plane in flight.
Stone Donates
Finance Data
The trust company movement
in the United States is the subject
of material presently in the Mich-
igan Historical Collections at the
University.
The material, a gift; of Ralph
Stone of Detroit, is an addition to
what Stone has also given telling
how Detroit was able to recover
financially from the 1929 stock
mnarket crash,
A University Regent from.1924-
1940, Stone is the oldest living
trust man. He is a retired execu-
tive officer and present director
of the Detroit Trust Company.
An 1889 graduate of Swarthmore
College, Stone also attended the
University where he was manag-
ing editor of The Daily,
and editor-in-chief of the Michi-
gan Law Journal.
t Since 1927 he has been a trustee
of the several Cranbrook Instit-
utions.

He is J. F. (Skeets) Coleman,
and he has incorporated some of
the features of the vertical takeoff
plane in the new combination
auto-plane.
Called the Aeromarine, the new
craft has a Delta wing of 43 de-
grees sweepback. Coleman became
familiar with the Delta wing's ad-
vantages as engineering test pilot
for Convair's division of General
Dynamics Corporation, assigned
to the vertical takeoff fighter, de-
signated by the Navy XFY-1, but
better known as the Pogo.
A 215-horsepower Franklin en-
gine driving ,a pusher propeller
mounted above the wing, aft of
the cabin, will power the Aeroma-
rine. It will have a range of 800
miles on 80 gallons of fuel and a
top speed of 225 miles an hour.
Cruising speed, with a payload of
four to five passengers, will be 200
miles an hour.
Coleman says the 2,500-pound
plane will be able to lift itself off
after a run of only 800 feet..
"The primary consideration in
the Aeromarine was to design a
good airplane that could operate
off land or water," Coleman says.
"Adapting the plane to operation
as a medium performance car was
secondary. We were satisfied with
a 50-mile-an-hour top speed on
land because anything more might
have interfered with its perform-
ance as a plane."

The race is still wide open fore
five positions on Student Govern-
ment Council.
Candidates will find the Coun-
cil, besides being a governing
body, is interested in many other
phases of campus life.
Working with foreign students,
various study committees of the
University such as the Housing
Study Committee and Student
Conduct Study Committee, help-
ing various organizations to
strengthen their groups on cam-
pus, supervising the exchange pro-
gram with the Free University of
Berlin, and revising and studying
the orientation program are just
a few of the areas in which the
council operates.
Three Standing Committees
SOC has three standing com-
mittees: Public Relations Commit-
tee, International and Human Re-
lations Committee, and the Cam-
pus Affairs Committee..
The Public Relations Commit-
tee attempts to keep the campus
informed as to the workings of the
Council, solicits student opinion
when the need arises, and is in
charge of setting up a speakers'
bureau to inform the campus on
specific subjects.
The committee also collects

ideas from other Big Ten schools
for student government and takes
charge of all-campus elections to
the Council. The International
and Human Relations Commit-
tee works closely with the Inter-
national Student Association to
improve the foreign student pro-
gram at the University.
Initiate Projects
Initiation of projects and the
study of more immediate prob-
lems of the student body in an at-
tempt to find ways to improve stu-
dent life on the campus comes un-
der the Campus Affairs Commit-
tee. Projects such as improving
pep rallies, registration and orien-
tation programs, the Student
Book Exchange, Cinema Guild
and faculty evaluation keeps the
student on this committee well in.
touch with campus problems.
Book Exchange, and faculty evalu-
ation keeps the student on this
committee well in touch with cam-
pus problems.
SOC, as a recognized body of
student government by the Re-
gents, has the power to recognize
student activities and groups, co-
ordinate and delegate these activ-
ities to be carried on by the var-
ious recognized campus groups, to
orient student opinion and to
voice campus opinion.
Working In Many Areas 4
At the present time the Council
is working in several areas of im-
portance to the campus: housing,
driving regulations, rushing pro-
cedures and student conduct.
The student will be able to work
with faculty, administration and
other students in solving, and
studying campus issues.
Petitioning for candidates will
continue until 5 p.m. today when
they are due in Rm. 1020 Admini-
stration Building.
Elections will be held Tuesday
and Wednesday, Nov. 15-16.

44

SGC PRESIDENT HANK BERLINER WITH EXECUTIVE
SECRETARY MRS. RUTH CALLAHAN PLAN THE AGENDA

4
*

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)
Service Helper Meal Jobs available now.
Apply Residence Halls, 1056 Administra-
tion Bldg.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS-
Representatives from the following
will be at the Engrg. School:
Mon., Oct. 31
Westinghouse Air Brake Co., wilmerd-
ing, Penn.,- B.S. in Aero., Elect., Ind.,
Math., Physics and Science, and B.S.
& M.S. in Mech. E. and Mechanics for
Research, Development, Design, Sales
and Staff. U.S. citizens.
Udylite Corp., Detroit, Mich. -- all
levels in Chem., Elect., Mech., Metal.,
and E. Mechanics for Research and
Design.
The Texas Co., Bellaire, Texas - all
levels Chem. E., PhD in Mech., M.S. &
PhD in Physics, Nuclear & Elect, for
Research, Development, and Produc-
tion.
Stauffer Chem. Co., Chauncey, N. Y.-
all levels of Chem. E. for Research and
Development.
Los Alamos Scientific Lab., Los Ala-
mos, N. Mex.-all levels in Aero., Chem.
E., Civil, Construction, Elect., Instru-
mentation, Materials, Math., Mech., E.
Mechanics,,Metal., Nuclear, Physics, and
Science for Summer and Regular Re-
search, Development, and Design. U.S.
citizens.
Linde Air Prod. Div., Union Carbide
& Carbon Corp., Tonawanda, N. Y.-
PM only-PhD in Elect. for Research,
Development, and Sales.
Tues., Nov. 1
The Trane Co., various locations-
B.S. & M.S. in Aero., Chem. E., Civil,
Elect., Ind., Metal., and Mechanics;
B.S., M.S. & PhD in Mech. E. for Re-
search, Design, Development, Produc-
tion and Sales.
Mallinckrodt Chem. Works, St. Louis,
Mo.-B.S., M.S. and PhD in Chem. E.
for Research, Development, Design, and
Production. U.S. citizen.

City of Cincinnati, Civil Service Com-
mission & Dept. of Personnel, Cincin-
nati, Ohio-B.S. in Civil, U.S. citizens,
for Design and Construction.
Studebaker-Packard Corp., Detroit,
Mich.-all levels of Mech. for Research,
Development, and Design.
Tues., & Wed., Oct. 1 & 2
Chance Vought Aircraft, Inc., Dallas,
Texas-all levels in Aero., Mech., Civil,
Elect., and Math, for Research, Design,
and Development.
Nat'i Cylinder Gas Co., Louisville, Ky.
-all levels in Chem., Civil, Elect., Con-
struction, Ind., Instrumentation, Mater-
ials, Math., Mech., Metal., and E. Mech-
anics for Research, Development, Design
.and Sales. U.S. citizen.
Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.-all levels in Aero., Chem.,
Civil, Elect., Industrial, Instrumenta-'
tion, Math., Mech., Metal., Naval and
Marine, Nuclear, Physics and Science,
Engrg. Mechanics for Research, Develop-
ment, and Design.
For appointments contact the Engrg.
Placement Office, 347 W. Engrg. Bldg.,
Ext. 2182.
Representatives from the following
will be at the Bureau of Appointments
this week:
Wed., Oct. 26-PM only:
National Security Agency, Washing-
ton, D. C.-men and women, any degree
with Language, Math. or Physics majors
and B.A. level in General Liberal Arts
fields with minor in Language, Math.,
Statistics, Physics, or the Physical
Sciences.
Thurs., Oct. 27
N.S.A.-interviewing men and women
with the qualifications listed above.
Swift & Co., Hdq., Chicago, 111.-men
in Bus Ad or LSA for Sales, Purchasing,
Administration, Accounting & Clerical,
Research'and General Trainees. MORN-
ING ONLY.
For appointments contact the Bureau
of appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
Ext. 371.

~1

DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Story-
GAIL GOLDSTEIN
Pictures-
CHUCK KELSEY

A
V
4

PROMOTING GOOD RELATIO NS WITH FOREIGN STUDENTS
IS PART OF THE COUNCIL'S JOB

. 4

_,
1

ESPECIALLY FOR YOU

A full year's subscription to any
one of these three great weekly
magazines at these reduced prices
. . . for college students only. Take
TIME, The Weekly Newsmagazine,
for less than 6 a week ... or LIFE,
America's favorite pictorial, for less
than 8t a copy ... or SPORTS ILLuS-
TRATED, the first national sports
weekly, for less than 8ยข an issue.
The purchase of one magazine does
not require the purchase of another;
your special student prices are good
for all or any of these three weeklies.
Sign up today at the campus book-
store or with your college agent.

$3.0
* 0
SO
X4.00

x
.,
.
,
.

COLLECTING TICKETS FOR A CINEMA GUILD SGC TREASURER DICK GOOD EXPLAINS PARTICULARS
PERFORMANCE OF THE NEW STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDINg

fI

4.

L

TO

SENIOR WOMEN

Majoring in Business Administration
New and exciting careers for college women are opening up in
the Customer Contact, Administrative, and Personnel fields of
telephone work at Michigan Bell.
We can now offer a wide variety of excellent positions to
college women with good scholastic records who have majored
in Business Administration.

f'

.. .'... .~c 4V~U~ -

. I

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