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October 22, 1955 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-10-22

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PAGE SVC

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATU RWAY, MEE 1 0,1999

BANDUNG CONFERENCE:
Cousins Discusses 'Information Crisis'

Junior College Students
Hold Round Table At 'U'

By BETTY SCHOMER

"The security and freedom of
the American people depend on
their ability to know."
Speaking to the Michigan Asso-
ciation of Junior Colleges at Rack-
ham yesterday, Norman Cousins,
editor of the "Saturday Review"
discussed "The Information Crisis
in America" with particular refer-
ence to the East.
Stressing tht "we do not yet
know enough," Cousitis used the
recent Asia-African Conference
which he attended as an example.
"The only harm done to the Unit-
ed States at Bandung was the
harm we caused ourselves, by our-
selves."
Emphasizes U.S. Opposition
Emphasizing the opposition of
the U.S. to the conference, Cousins
said that "in spite of what Ameri-
ca thought, this conference was
not a sounding board for world
Communism." Criticizing lack of
adequate coverage of the event,
Cousins said that "the only thing
wa~ were looking for at Bandung
was a brawl because brawls make
news."
He described the opening speech
of the conference in which "The
Midnight Ride of Paul Revere"
was read, commemorating the
180th anniversary of the famous
event. "No event was more mean-
ingful to their needs than the
ride of PaulRevere ... if we had
truly remembered what happened
180 years ago, it would have been
impossible for us to miscalculate
Bandung," Cousins said.
'"Our first frontier is in Asia and
Africa," said Cousins. Asia and
Africa represent the majority ...
if one more populous nation, such
as India or Pakistan, were to go
under or over then, for the first
time, Communism would speak for
a majority of people.
Need 'Ear of America'
'The aim of world Communism
is. to leave the United States all
dressed up with its atomic bombs
and no place to go,' he said. "What
is needed is not so much a Voice
of America as an Ear of America.
We need to sit back and listen once
in a while."
Cousins maintained that there
M chigras
Places Open-
T1"o Students
Petitions are still available for
the Michigras Central committee
in the Union Student Offices, the
Women's Athletic Building, Bar-
bour Gymnasium and the Under-
graduate Office of the League.
Positions which must be filled
are two chairmen for decorations,
parade, booth, programs, publicity,
tickets and refreshment com-
mittees, and one chairman for the
concession, finance and poster
committees.
One student will also be selected
as secretary and another as head
of publicity for The Daily.
Petitions are due at 5 p.m. Mon-
day in the Student Offices of the
Unions.
The League Undergraduate Of-
fice is open at all hours.
kAcacia Wins
IFC Award
A trophy given to the fraternity
pledge class with the highest scho
lastic achievement was awarded
to Acacia for a 28.7 average last
semester.
The award was presented at the
IF pledge convocation held Wed-
nesday night. A three foot tro-

phy, it is offered by the Sigma Chi
Foundation.
Last spring's achievement marks
the fourth time Acacia has won
this award. They held it in '51,
'52, and the spring semesters of
'54 and '55.
organization
Notices
First Baptist Church: Oct. 23, Guild
Bible Class, Parables of Jesus, 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service, Rev. Loucks speaking
on "Thy Kingdom Come," 11:00 a.m.
Guild, Rev. Lloyd Averill, Dean of
Chapel at Kalamazoo College, speaking
on "Recharging Your Spiritual Battery,"
6:45 p.m.
*, . *
Episcopal Student Foundation cor-
dially invites you to attend the Forman
Opening Reception at Canterbury
House. 218 N, Division Street. Oct. 23,
3:00-5:00 p.m. and 7:00-9:00 p.m.
9 * *
Folk Dancing: Oct. 24, 7:30-10:00 p.m.,
Lane Hall recreation room. Instruction
for every dance. Beginners are welcome.
s* *
Folk Sing: Oct. 23s 8:30 p.m., Stevens
Co-op House, 816S .'Forest.
* w *"
Michigan Union Tryouts: Oct. 26,
7:15 p.m.. Room 3-S. Michigan Union.

Representatives from nine Mi-
chigan junior colleges visited the;
campus yesterday to discuss mu-
tual problems and to study student
activities at the University.
Called the Michigan Junior Col-
lege Council Round Table, the
group assembles once a semester
at the various junior colleges to
exchange ideas and to work out
possible solutions.
In charge of the fall Meeting,
Don Smith of Jackson Junior Col-
lege arranged for the group to
visit Ann Arbor because they, were
especially interested in the Stu-
dent Government Council. He
made complete arrangements for
the one-day meeting.
The group of about 50 students
met with members of SGC in the
Union to discuss problems of par-
ticipation in student activities, stu-
dent constitutions, student activi-
ty financing and aspects of the
National Students Association.
Fritz Glover, '56, chairman of
Joint Judiciary, and Jim Dygert,
'56BAd., City Editor of The Daily,1
also participated in panel discus-
sions concerning judicial and
newspaper relations. n
Composed of representatives;

from student governments and ac-
tivities of the participating schools,
the Round Table sought advice
from University student leaders
that would help them at the jun-
ior college level.
Tom Malin of Flint Junior Col-
lege was elected president of the
organization for the next year.
Following the afternoon session,
the group toured the campus.
Participating schools were Jack-
son, Alpena, Traverse City, High-
land Park,/ Port Huron, Grand
Rapids, Flint, Dearborn and Ford
Junior Colleges.
ICC Vote Rejects
House Purchase
Inter Cooperative Council mem-
bers voted last night to reject pur-
chase of a house located at 509
South Division.
Two other pieces of property are
still being considered for purchase
by the ICC.
A Development subcommittee
was set up to determine the pos-
sibilities of subsidizing the cost of
a house.

U' Honors
Courses Aid
Top Students-
Prizes, scholarships and honors
curricula in the University offer
specialized and intensive study and
reward for students.
The honors curriculum, enabling
top students to graduate with hon-
ors in their field of study is offered
in eleven departments.
Seminar-type classes, extra out-
side reading, and private consul-
tation on individual student pro-
jects are general features of the
courses.
Students maintaining a B av-
erage in their field of concentra-
tion may enter the honor courses
during the junior year.
Prizes and scholarships for out-
standing students are also offered
with the programs. Examples of
these are the Sims Honor Schol-
arship in Economics with a stipend
of $500, the Bronson-Thomas
Prize for an undergraduate in Ger-
man and the William. Jennings
Bryan Prize in political science
given to a student in the political
science graduating class.

The Second Choral Union con-
cert, featuring the, Boston Sym-
phony Orchestra, will be present-
ed by the University Musical So-
ciety at 8:30 p.m. Monday in Hill
Auditorium.
The symphony's program will
include Berlioz's "Fantastic Sym-
phony,""Haydn's "Symphony No.
102" and Ravel's "Daphnis and
Chloe."
Ticket information may be ob-
tained at the offices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society in Burton
Tower.
The Boston Symphony has ap-
peared annually in Ann Arbor for
more than a quarter of a century
and at intervals before that time
since 1890.
Charles Munch, its maestro for
the past five years, will conduct.
Born in Strasbourg, hig lifetime
has been devoted to music-first as
a violinist and since 1932 as a
conductor.
The Boston Symphony came into
existence through the enterprise
of a young Boston banker, Henry
IU Higginson.
In 1881, Higginson engaged the
best musicians he could find in
Europe and a young conductor

Boston Symphony Orchestra
To Perform At Hill Concert

named Georg Henschel. In 1900,
the Orchestra moved into its own
auditorium, Symphony Hall.
Among the symphony's conduct-
ors have been such names as
Muck, Rabaud, Monteux and
Koussevitzky.
'U' Press Prints
Elizabethan Book
"The Elizabethan Journals" by
Prof. G. B. Harrison, of the Eng-
lish department, has just been
made available by the University
press.
The volume is compiled from
state papers, records and chroni-
cles.
Stressing human interest, court
'news, society chatter, anecdotes,
wisecracks, obituaries, theater
gossip and medical misinforma-
tion, the book is a synthetic diary
of Elizabethan England.
Daily Classifieds
Read anid.Use

--Courtesy-University News Service
NORMAN COUSINS... Sit back and listen

are "three diseases from which
mass communication media suf-
fer": (1) passion for the inside
story; everyone tries so hard to be
exclusive; (2) craving for a
brawl; (3) not enough emphasis
given to long range events that
make history.
. Speaking of the uniqueness of
western man, Cousins pointed out
that, generally, we are concerned
with Western man, Western ideas
and Western civilizations. We are
not made sufficiently aware of
the increased diversity of both the
Duff To Lead
Arthritis Talk
"The Clinical and Biochemical
Aspects of Arthritis" will be dis-
cussed by the Second Kresge Medi-
cal Research Seminar Monday at
4:45 p.m.
The purpose of the newly or-
ganized seminar is to co-ordinate
laboratory findings concerning ar-
thritis with patient care.
Dr. Ivan F. Duff, physician-in-
charge of the Arthritis Research
Unit, will moderate the seminar.
Prof. Saul Roseman, of the biolo-
gical chemistry department, will
assist him.
The seminar will be held in the
University K r e s g e Conference
Room.

East and the West.
Disorders Came From West
Infrequently we might recall
that the prime disorders of our
own time, Nazism and, Commun-
ism, came from the West, not tlU
East, Cousins said.
He suggested the possibility of
a lateral (selecting certain key
years in world history and the
position of countries important at
that time) rather than a vertical
(tracing one country from its be-
ginning up to the present) ap-
proach to history.
Responsible for bringing a group
of Hiroshima girls, disfigured by
the atomic bomb explosion, to the
United States for medical care,
recently Cousins described the dif-
ficulties that were involved.
Show Skepticlism
Some feared that the girls would
become homesick, that they could
not adjust to American living and
would become political liabilities,
exploiting communism.
However, just the opposite has
been the result. The girls have
adopted the U.S. as their second
home and the venture has done
much in promoting good will for
the U.S. in Hiroshima.
In a question period after his
talk, Cousins commented on the
U.S. position in Communist Chi-
na. "It is dangerous to admit
Communist China to the UN at
the present time; it's a matter of,
waiting some time until it works
out."

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ST MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen
ter.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M. Friends Meeting,
10:45 A.M. Sunday School.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:001:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, Eugene
A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship: "Frontiersmen
of World Order." Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 - 10:30 A.M.-Two discussion groups--- ;
one on the Sermon on the Mount - in the
Study Room. The other on the Teachings of
Jesus-Pine Room.
5:30 P.M.-Supper and fellowship.
6:45 P.M. Worship and program. Dr. William
Baker, Presbyterian University Pastor will
speak on "Revolution and Reconciliation."
7:30 P.M. Fireside Forum-(Granduate Students,
and Post-College age) Discussion on the Bahai
Faith. Youth Room.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, O p e n
Daily.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and Williams Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
All departments of Church School including nur-
sery, 10:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 10:45. Reception of members.
Dr. Parr will preach on "High Moment." A
Coffee Hour will follow the service.
Pilgrim Fellowship (High School); 5:30 p.m.
Student Guild, 7:00 p.m. Sue Gillespie will talk
on her summer's work in Palestine.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
Minister: C. H. Loucks
Student Advisor: Beth Mahone
Sunday, October 23:
9:45 Guild Bible Class Parables of Jesus.
11:00 Worship Service. Rev. Loucks is speaking
on "Thy Kingdom Come.
6:45 Guild. Rev. Lloyd Averill, Dean of Chapel
at Kalamazoo College, is speaking on "Re-
charging your Spiritual Battery."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor.
Sunday-9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services
10:00A.M. Bible Class.
7:00 P.M. LSA Meeting-Speaker, Rev. Everett
Bunck, "The Church Year."
Thursday 7:15 P.M. Discussion Series "Science &
Religion-Dr. Gerhard Lenski.

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone No 2-1121.
William C. Bennet,, Pastor.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sermon "The Ground of Atonement."
17:00 P.M. Sermon: "Boldness of Christ."
7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
We welcome each of you.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church -Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday from 9:00 A.M. on: Leadership Work-
shop, sponsored by the Gamma Delta chapters
In the Northeastern Region.
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "How To Cultivate
Good Habits."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. "Fireside Forum,"
conducted by the pastor.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service "Did the Reformers For-
get Something?"
7:00 Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Euseblue A. Stephonou
9:30-Matins Service.
10:30---Divine Liturgy.
11:00-Greek Sermon
12 :00--English Sermon.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Reverend Press --
"Our Christian Ability for World Community!'
4:00 P.M. Meeting for an outing at Whitmore
Lake.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the'
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday services at 8, 9, 11 A.M. and 8 PM.
Breakfast following the 9 A.M. service,
Formal Opening Reception at Canterbury House
3-5 P.M. and 7-9 P.M.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
191.7 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister.
Mrs. Gerald Bailey, Parish Assistant.
10:00,A.M. Unitarian Adult Group. Professor
Preston Slosson on "The Reformation.
11:00 A.M. Service of Worship-Rev. Edward
H. Redman preaching on: "The Story of World
Brotherhood."
12:00 Coffee Hour.
6:30 P.M. Unitarian Student Group. Rev. John
Morgan of Flint, Michigan and Rev. Edward
H. Redman as panel: "Issues of Liberal Reli-
gion." Transportation from Lane Hall and
Stockwell at 6:15 P.M.

TO BE
INTERVIEWED
QN YOUR
CAMPUS
As a division of General Dynamics Corporation,
CONVAIR occupies an important place in the long-
range development of the Nation's aerial defense as
well as commercial aviation. This assures excellent
career opportunities for professional accomplishment
and personal income.
CO N YA1 R
A DIVISION OF GENERAL DYNAMICS CORPORATION.
FORT WORTH, TEXAS

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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.

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