100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1955 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,1955

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

P GL .' ..

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i CAVE' iJLJ KVMjg

«

CHARLESTON-Any student can learn to dance the Charleston
as well as many other dances at the League sponsored classes.
Classes are held for both beginners and advanced persons, as well
as for students attending in couples or alone.
X League Classes Offer
andCng InstriUCtions

Many Places
For Studying
Now Open
Study Halls Available
In College Buildings,
At Union, Lane Hall
Freshman entering the Univer-
sity will be very pleasantly sur-
prised to find so many interesting
and modern places for studying.
Anything from small homey
lounges to large rooms of modern
design can be found.
Rooms in the Union, League and
Lane Hall are available in addition
to the General Library and many
divisional libraries and study halls.
The League offers a place for
women to study with their dates in
the third floor hall and in the
Henderson Room on the same
floor. The atmosphere is informal
with comfortable chairs, couches
and tables. Smoking is also per-
mitted in this room.
Open to women only is the
League Library on the third floor.
This room is also arranged infor-
mally and offers a chance for coeds
to remove their shoes while con-
centrating on their books.
For breaks between studying,
the League has coke and soft drink
machines as well as the Round-Up
room in the basement. There is also
a television set available.
Union Study Hall
The Union offers a study hall
for men and their dates. Two
rooms are equipped with tables
and chairs, and coke machines
and telephones are nearby. Smok-
ing is allowed in the hall.
Lane Hall is equipped with a li-
brary which has regular hours dur-
ing the semester. The room is fur-
nished with tables, comfortable
chairs, couches and has a fire-
place.
A branch of the General Library,
it has a large number of books,
basically religious reference books.
There are also many periodicals
and magazines along religious and
human relation lines.
Divisional Libraries
The General Library and its di-
visional libraries have sources for
specialized fields. These are locat-
ed in the individual college build-
ings such as education, natural re-
sources, fine arts, music and engi-
neering.
One of the most modern of cam-
pus study facilities is in the Busi-
ness Administration Building. A
large number of periodicals are
kept there.

By JAN JAGUSCH
Men's Glee Club
University history was made by
the 40 member Men's Glee Club
when a year of sponsorship of
campus activities paid off in the
first visit to Europe in its 96 year
existence.
June and July were spent by
the men in giving 16 concerts in
six European countries.
Sponsorship of Norman Granz'
"Jazz at the Philharmonic," Fred
Waring's Pennsylvanians, Gilan-
tics and a combined concer; with
Ohio State we part of the
Club's busy year.
Directed by Prof. Phillip A.
Duey of the School of Music, the
group ranks as the second oldest
college glee :club in America. It
is composed of graduate and un-
dergraduate members from every
college in the University.
Past memoers of the organiza-
tion include Thomas E. Dewey,
former governor of New York, and
Stuart Churchill, a tenor soloist
with Fred Waring's Pennsylva-
nians for many years.
The club has sung coast to
coast, from New York City to
Portland, Ore., since its begin-
ning. It has appeared under the
sponsorship of alumni clubs, con-
cert organizations, civic and serv-

50 voice group culminated last
year's spring tour with an appear-
ance in New York's famed Carne-
gie Hall.
Beside appearing in the East,
the Singers also make extensive
tours throughout Michigan and
parts of Ohio.
The personnel of the organiza-
tion is made up, in general, of ad-
vance voice majors and graduate
students from the music school.
Prof. Klein remarked about the
group, "The presence of the Mich-
igan Singers on campus affords
gifted students the opportunity to
participate in a group worthy of
their abilities and competence' as
musicians."
The organization's most recent
appearance was in the Class B an-
nual high school Music Festival
sponsored by t h e Michigan
Schools Vocal Association held in
Ann Arbor.
SRA Affairs
conducted

Musical Groups Play
Important Part at 'U'

I '!

On the University campus danc-
ing is one of the most enjoyed so-
cial activities. So for this reason
the Michigan League is offering a
series of dance classes.
Instruction is given at all levels
and everyone can find a class to
suit his own particular need,
whether he is a beginner or an ad-
vanced dancer. The beginning
classes give the student a solid
background in the fundamental
steps such as fox trot, waltz, rum-
ba and tango.
Intermediate classes are offered
to coeds and men who know fun-
damentals, but want to learn more
steps.,In the advanced class dance
techniques and style are the center
of concentration. Then there is an
exhibition group for the more pro-
ficient dancers.
Free for Coeds
All classes are free to coeds. Any
woman interested in learning new
steps and meeting new friends can
act as a hostess at the singles
classes or may come to one of the
doubles classes with a partner.
A small fee is charged to men at
the beginning of the series.
Classes this fall will once again

be under the direction of John Ur-
banic, former dance instructor in a
Detroit studio.He will teach stu-
dents the steps of the mambo;
the dance which is currently pop-
tlar on campus.
Added Attraction
An added attraction for both
coeds and men is the Date Bureau
which functions in connection with
the doubles classes. Those interest-
ed in having blind dates may sign
up for this service at the beginning
of the classes.
League dance classes for the fall
semester will begin Monday, .Oct.
10, and continue for eight weeks.
They are scheduled as follows for
the fall semester: Monday-ad-
vanced doubles from 7:15 to 8:15
p.m. and exhibition group from
8:30 to 9:30 p.m.; Tuesday-sin-
gles from 7:15 to 8:15 p.m. and
couples from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m.;
Wednesday-singles from 7:15 to
8:15 p.m. and intermediate doubles
from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m.
There will be a mass meeting for
everyone interested in the classes
on Wednesday, Oct. 5, in the
League Ballroom.

At Lane Hal

I

ice groups
partments.
It also
spring of
songs for
company.

and school music de-
made a record last
a medley of college
a major recording

Choral Union
One of the University's musical
groups, Choral Union, reigns as
one of the oldest permanent chor-
al groups existing in the country.
Established in 1879, over 20,-
000 persons have sung in it, and
many of the over 300 present
members are grandchildren or
great - grandchildren of early
members.
The collaboration of four lo-
cal churches for a performance
of Handel's "Messiah" was the
spark that ignited the idea that
eventually grew into the present
organization.
Features of the group's season
are participation in the Univer-
sity's May Festival in the spring
and presentation of the "Messiah"
every December.
Since the May Festival's origin
in 1894, the organization has sung
at two or three concerts every
season.
Choral Union has performed all
of the great oratorios, many of the
operas adapted for choral use
and a variety of other works dur-
ing their 75 year existence.
Lester McCoy, conductor, holds
auditions each fall during the ori-
entation period for prospective
members.
Michigan Singers
Many concert appearances on
campus and tours through other
parts of the country have high-
lighted the Michigan Singers' sev-
en years on campus.
Directed by Prof. Maynard
Klein of the School of Music, the

By SANDRA CUTLER
Lane Hall, the home of the Uni-
versity's Student Religious Associ-
ation, stands for brotherhood,
equality and freedom.
Its doors are always open and
any student on campus is wei-
come.
Within the building are nu-
merous facilities which help to
make possible the activities of
SRA, including an extensive li-
brary of religious books, a music
room, a dark room, an auditor-
ium, and rooms for conferenares,
meditation and recreation.
SRA Activities
S q u a r e dances, intercultural
outings, publications, coffee hours,
and work camps are some of the
activities that Lane Hall sponsors.
One of the highlights of the
year is the annual debate of
"Ethics-by God or Man." Last
year religious leaders of Judaism,
Protestantism, and Catholicism
spoke, and their speeches served
as a basis for seminars, house dis-
cussions, radio programs and per-
sonal interviews.
DeWitt Baldwin, coordinator of
religious affairs, said, "Courses of-
fered interdepartmentally in the
field of relig on and the trial
cams us inter-religious program
brought together under the lead-
ership of Lane Hall staff provide
an ever widening laboratory of ex-
perience."
Religious Understanding
"It is hoped that through these
stddents may understand their
own religion better, and grow to
appreciate similar values found In
the other religious systems of
the world."
The functions of the Student
Religious Association are two-
fold. It acts as the agent by which
22 organized religious groups or
guilds of the campus cooperate
with each other, and it serves as
a religious fellowship.

I'

MODERN FURNISHINGS:
Little Rooms Used for Listening, Study

Since their dedication last Janu-
ary the Barbara Little music lis-
tening rooms in the League have
become a popular place for study-
ing, relaxing and listening.
The three soundproof listening
rooms, located on the third floor of
the League across from the League
Library, are decorated in attractive
color schemes all in a modern style
with .harmonizing furniture and
draperies.
Each room has its own distince
tive color scheme and furnishings.
Color Schemes
Room "A" is decorated in quiet
muted tones of brown, beige and
lime. Room "B," done incolors of
black, grey and shocking pink,
features ultra-modern furniture.
Restful shades of rose, grey and
green are found in Room "C."
For those students, both men
and women, who wish to listen to
the records of their choice the
listening rooms offer an outstand-
inig collection of long playing clas-
sical music.
The student is able to choose
from a wide selection of operas,
ballets, Shakespearean plays and
poetry.
Music Literature{
Since the collection contains
most of the records used in the
music literature courses, Room "C"
has been set aside for the exclusive
use of music literature students.

Lists of available records are
posted in the hall outside the
rooms. Students wishing to hear
specific records simply ask the
League Librarian to play them on
the central turntable and have the
music piped into a particular room.
The listening rooms are dedi-
cated to the memory of the late
Barbara J. Little who died in an
automobile accident in the summer
of 1951 following her graduation.
Varied Activities
Miss Little, chairman of Wo-
men's Judiciary Council in 1950-51,
was a principle figure in the estab-
lishment of the Joint Judiciary
Council.
She was also on the executive
board of the Women's Senate,
Women's League, Council, Student
Affairs Committee, Board of Rep-
resentatives, Scroll and Panhel-
lenic Rushing Chairman in 1949-
50.
Funds for the soundproof ing,
painting, draperies, rugs, lamps
and furniture of the listening
rooms were obtained from the
Leaguesactivities of 1952 and 1953
such as Frosh Weekend, Sopho-
more Cabaret, Junior Girls Play,
Senior Supper and the Summer
Session.
Local Contributions
These funds were supplemented

by special contributions from in-
dividuals and a $200 gift from Del-
ta Delta Delta, of which Miss Lit-
tle was an alumna, for purchasing
the furniture in Room "B." A pic-
ture and memoriam of Miss Little
also appear in this room.
The listening rooms will oe open:
Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m.
to noon, 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and
7 p.m. to 10 p.m; Friday, 9 a.m.
to noon and 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
and Sunday, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and
7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

l
i
I

Daily Classifieds Bring Quick Results

I

r7

---_.

THE QUARRY, Inc.

Welcomes You to the Michigan Campus

. . presenting THE FINEST in

NATIONALLY-KNOWN BEAUTY AIDS

C7 -

v" =_ i

WELCOME TO THE CLASS OF 1959
AND FORMER STUDENTS

VISIS US FOR ALL YOUR
NEEDED ACCESSORIES
" BATES BEDSPREADS & DRAPES
* DRESSER SCARFS
' LAUNDRY BAGS
. SHOE BAGS
o SMALL THROW RUGS
w BATH TOWELS & WASH CLOTHS
" BLANKETS
t SHEETS & PILLOW CASES

/t
7
. T
z
!NMI #

Our Treatmen Line includes . . .
ELIZABETH ARDEN
HELENA RUBENSTEIN
REVLON
FRANCES DENNEY
Choose from our
Importd Fragrance Line . .
GUERLAIN
CARON

YOUR REGISTRATION Is Incomplete
Until You've Opened Your Student's
CHARGE LCCOUNT
No Red Tape ... Just Show Your I.D. Card
302 SOUTH STATE STREET
Clothes Headquarters for Michigan Co-eds
HOME of
ANNE FOGARTY DRESSES
ETON BRITISHER BLAZERS
HAYMAKER SHIRTS
EVAN-PICONE SKIRTS
DALTON CASHMERES
WONDAMERE SWEATERS
GEORGIA KAY SEPARATES
and fashions from many other famous

I

i

III

. .. and many other quality cosmetics.

11

iill

11 1

I

{

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan