100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 18, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAGE SEC

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAV.4 B 19. 1995

_A. t HEMCHGN AL

... SDAYa. a. OCT,+.'~i'. I+RB 1~UN

w

Satellite To Be Launched

' ----

(Continued from Page 1)
most effective instruments for re-
searching from a rocket is the kind
of information needed to Pffec-
tively design a satellite to be used
for research at h'gher levels.
Aim for Accuracy
Their most important job was
making eleetronie equipment tnaG
could accurately determine air
pressure and temperature in the
upper atmosphere from the rush
of air past the rocket's pointed
nose in the brief time of its flight.-
Techniues learned will be val-
uable in the establishment of a
satellite 2i f miles above theearth,
Spencer said.
Another resew ch group, in the
°RI's Rocket Propulsion Labora-
tory at Willow' Run, has 'een

The satellite would be taken up
by a rocket and left in the atmos-
phere to circle the earth. Both
techniques for effective recording
oquipment in the satellite and
methods of efficient rocket firing
are therefore important.
Also connected with rocket re-
search .s the Aircraft Prop ilsion
Laboratry at Willow Run. This
group studies combustions, fluid
flow, detonation waves, fuel spray
efficiency and the effect of radio-
activity or fuel combustion.
Greek Petitioning
Greek Week petitioning will last
until Oct. 24 at 5 p.m. in the

searching for improved methods Interfraternity Council offices, ac-
of ignitir.g propellants in rocket cording to Chuck Weir, '57.
engines, and for better ways of General chairmanships for both
controlling the performance of Greek Week and IFC Ball are open
rocket eugines during flight. for petitioning.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
PHYSICISTS
Let ARMA talk with you about YOUR future
in the
Dynamic and Challenging Field of
Electro-Mechanical Instrumentation
See Your Placement Officer for
Time and Place
The Date is Wednesday, October 19
K, E

Keio Press
Gives News-
In English
By CATHERINE RAMBEAU
A Japanese counterpart of The
Daily is The Mita Campus, a news-
paper printed in English by stu-
dents at Keio University in Tok-
yo.
Organization of the completely!
Japanese-staffed newspaper is
similar to many of the American
college papers, with several re-
porters serving under a complete
editorial board.
However, unlikedmany college
papers in this country, the news-
paper is under the complete re-
sponsibility of the student editors.
All Local News
An unusual aspect of the month-
ly is its attention to local news.
No world news is included in its
pages. A large amount of space
is devoted to intellectual activi-
ties such as debating, scholarship
awards and news from various de-
partments of the University.
The sports side of the news has
not been overlooked by Keio re-
porters; but it is written with al-
most alarming honesty.
Referring to an approaching
baseball game, the sports editor
says "these matches will be an
easy victory for Keio, because Tok-
yo University is still having trouble
trying to get out of the cellar."
Articles Less Objective
News articles in The Campus are
written less objectively than most
college papers in America, with
the editorial "we" used frequently.
A report by Tamako Yagai on the
World University Service is en-
tirely in the first person, and is
written so subjectively that the
reader wonders if it is true.
Makeup differs slightly in the
Japanese paper. Headlines are
smaller, and 'the paper employs a
tabloid fold, similar to a maga-
zine. Stories are generally short-
er, and the photographs are small-
er and rather scattered.
But the excellent English usage
throughout the paper is impres-
sive. The few mistakes are unim-
portant when it is realized that
the Keio students have published,
edited and written a newspaper in
what is to them a foreign langu-
age..
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

SURGEON GENERAL:
Country Must Support
Public Health: Scheele

By ERNEST THEODOSSIN
"If public health is to grow it
y should do so at the demand of the
public," Surgeon General of the
nation's Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare, said yes-
terday.
Speaking on "The Modern Pub-
lic Health Movement" to a crowd
I of 150 people at the public health
school, Dr. Scheele cited the diffi-
culty of affecting a public health
practice over the objections of
'many communities.
"In the case of fluoride satura-
tion of water, we find people who
are unwilling to accept the bene-
fits of this practice and who will
vote to have it stopped," he said.
"This, of course, is a real problem
which the public health practi-
tioner must overcome."
Polio Vaccine Contrasted
With something like Salk polio
vaccine, "when the vaccine was
announced here in Ann Arbor last
'April 12, there was almost univer-
sal demand," he contrasted.
Dr. Scheele said that as new
industries and inventions change
the course of modern life, there
is an increased need for public
health and for expansion of tech-
niques through research.
"We will always be limited
MIEA Meeting
Closes Today
The third annual regional con-
ference of the Michigan Educa-
tion Association will conclude to-.
day.
The conference opened yester-
day With a general session in Hill
Auditorium. After the meeting,
MEA members from Washtenaw,
Jackson, Lenawee and Monroe,
counties attended group meetings
to discuss common problems and
hear speakers on professionalism,
politics and travel.
Today's speakers for the group1
meetings include: James W. Lewis,'
vice-president for student affairs;'
Clifford Erickson, dean of the edu-
cation school at MSU, Ralph Saw-
yer, dean of Rackham School of
Graduate Studies, and Henry J.
Gomberg,. assistant director of
Michigan Memorial Phoenix Pro-i
ject.

i

... the development
of NUCLEAR AIRCRAFT

l

DR. LEONARD A. SCHEELE
... more hygiene classes.
somewhat by scientific knowledge.
to do research. But there are some
checks and balances, and these re-
late to public acceptance," he
added,
Broader Mission
"Practitioners of professional
medicine in private- employment
tend to see themselves in relation
to the single patient. We must
reecognize public health as a
broader mission," he said.
Dr. Scheele pointed out that
One of our constant calls must be
there is increased need for mental
health institutions, particularly
organizations that can accommo-
date borderline cases or that can
work with children.
He said he favors increased in-
struction of hygiene in the na-
tion's school systems and the
training of professional people
whose exclusive function is to un-
dertake such education.
Highway .Safety Important
"There are many practitioners
who would confine public health
to sanitation and communicable
diseases. But we can't ignore these
other responsibilities."
A quiet-spoken man, the serious
surgeon general added that high-
way safety was an important part
of public health. He compared the
11 nationwide deaths from polio
in the first six months of this
year with the 150 deaths result-
ing from automobile accidents in
Los Angeles during the first week
in September.
"With very little being done
about this from a health stand-
point," Dr. Scheele said that traf-
fic accidents were one of the
country's major health problems.

GRflDUI4TES
There is a
ONE WEEK EXTENSION
on the making of
GRADUATION PICTURE
APPOINTMENTS
at the
Student Publications Building
Tuesday through Friday
from 3:00 to 5:30 P.M.
Ensian Picture Proofs may be
returned 12:00 to 5:00 P.M.
and 7:00 to 9:00 P.M.

at
Ass
Cori
Oppj
field
miss
othe
Nati
com
aviat

CONVAIR--FORT WORTH
an integral part of General Dynamics
poration, CONVAIR offers you an
ortunity to enter the Applied Nuclear
[ or the fields of supersonic aircraft,
iles, weapon systems and
r developments in the
on's aerial defense and
mercial
ion.

Career opportunities for Engineering and Physics
Graduates at CONVAIR are attractive b~cause of
the wide diversification of fields, the excellence of
working conditions, and the assurance of financial
reward.
A CONVAIR representative will visit your school Oc-
tober 24. For information contact your Placement
Office or write to H. A. Badley, CONVAIR Engineering
Personnel Dept., Fort Worth, Texas.

................... ..........
.aw..d+....+..L:'tt.C~~~~~.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....ww. .'"4nf.«,...... ..i.. a.,.. ' .... .NWw" w .t'4 «:
YOUR
CLOTHES KNOW!;
that the
Best Laundry Service
in tS
*1:
WES TINGHOUSE
LAUNDROMAT
Fast Service -Efficiency-- Low Prices
2-DAY SHIRT SERVICE
Dry Cleaning
510 E. WILLIAM
Around the corner from the Student Publications Building
. . . . .. . . .. .. V
;.. . . . . . . . . . . .. i. ;:.y".. . ...;.}}i-:.. rr."r. .. . +,.v. :.: s. ':

Subscribe to -
The Michigan Daily

Co

NVY

A I R

A 'DIVISION OF GENERAL DYNAMICS CORPORATION
FORT WORTH, TEXAS

CONVAIRt
(SAN DIEGO)
Will be on Campus Oct. 26 and Oct. 27
TO INTERVIEW
ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL, AERONAUTICAL
ENGINEERS ABOUT TO GRADUATE
At Convair, in beautiful, smog-free San Diego, California, you will
find the diversity of challenging, far-reaching projects that offers you
the unlimited career opportunity you seek.
This is young country, beautiful, exciting country - the very heart
of the busy, vital aircraft and missile industries. And good, young
engineers are needed now to grow with new, long-range aircraft and
missile programs.
You will find the Convair Engineering Department a genuine "engi-
neer's" engineering department -imaginative, energetic, explorative.
You will discover the very latest engineering equipment, excellent
working conditions, salary, personal job advantages, and opportunities
for continuing education.
Remember these facts about Convair: Convair was awarded the
Nation's first production missile contract and the first production
contract for supersonic all-weather interceptors.
Convair has the greatest diversity of aircraft engineering projects
in the country, including high performance fighters; heavy bombers,
large flying boats, transports, trainers, seaplane fighters, vertical take-
off aircraft and guided missiles.
Convair has a completely integrated electronic development pro*
gram devoted to advanced development and design on missile guid-
ance, avionic projects, radar systems and special cathode ray tubes.
Now you are invited to get full information about your career at
Convair. Talk it over with our Convair Engineers on your campus soon.
GRADUATING CIVIL ENGINEERS interested in the field of aircraft
structure are also invited to apply.

LWWM-

The36thUnionOpe
Needs
ngers ..Actrs .,,Dancers

A

A

Tryouts Oct. 19-21 From

3-5

I

Call 2-4431, Opera Extension from 1-5 P.M.
For Audition Appointment Oct. 17-19

Graduate degree candidates in Engineering, Mathematics or Physics are invited
to discuss Convair opportunities in the general field of advanced engineering
analysis and design.

1

, I
CONVAIR ENGINEERS WILL INTERVIEW ON YOUR CAMPUS
OCT. 26 and OCT. 27

II

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan