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September 21, 1955 - Image 22

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Michigan Daily, 1955-09-21

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A MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,1955

ETWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,1955

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The Campus Churches
Welcome You!
Activities for Church Night (Sept. 23)
the Friday of Orientation Week
and for Registration Weekend .. .

I

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UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(1511 Washtenaw Avenue)
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Friday, Sept. 23: Six o'clock buffet supper for
freshmen and transfer students, followed by so-
cial evening. Phone NOrmandy 3-5560 for
reservations.
Sunday, Sept. 25: Two worship services, at 9:30
and at 10:45.
Sunday, Sept. 25, 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper and Program. No reser-
vation needed.
ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH
and the EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis, Social Director
Wednesday, September 21-
7:00 A.M.-Holy Communion
Thursday, September 22-
7:00 A.M.-Holy Communion
Friday, September 23-
12:10 P.M.-Holy Communion
Sunday, September 25-
8:00 A.M.-Holy Communion'
9:00 A.M.-Holy Communion
11:00 A.M.-Morning Prayer and Sermon
8:00 P.M.-Evening Prayer
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Corner-of Hill Street and Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Friday, September 23-
6:00 P.M.-Supper for New Students fol-
lowed by on Open House
Sunday, September 25-
9:00 A.M.-Matins Service
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study
11:00 A.M.-Worship Service
6:00 P.M.-Supper and Program
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Sunday Morning Service
September' 25
5:00 P.M.-Sunday Evening Service
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday Testimonial Service
A free rading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street, where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday
evening from 7 to 9 p.m. and Sunday after-
noons from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
A welcome is extended to all freshmen.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Phone NO 5-4205 - Office Phone NO
8-7421
10:00 A.M.-Morning Worship, Rev. Verduin
7:30 P.M.-Evening Service, Rev. Verduin
We extend a hearty welcome to all students.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.-Sunday Service
7:00 P.M.-Student Guild Meeting
Friday, September 17-There will be a supper
for new students at 6:30 P.M.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Students from Christian Churches and students
from Congregational Churches unite in a co-
operative student program:
Sunday Evening: Meeting at the Congregational'
Church, 7:00 P.M.
Tea at the Guild House every Tuesday, 4:30 to
6:00 P.M.
Friday, September 17 at 6:00 P.M.-There will
be a complimentary supper for new students at

the Congregational Church.
DISCIPLES STUDENT CENTER. .. 524 Thompson
H. .. Pickerill, Director
Sue Gillespie, Associate

FIRCT CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. Williams Streets
Rev. Leonard Parr, Minister
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Students from the Congregational Churches
and students from Christian Churches unite
in a cooperative student program:
Sunday Evening: Meetings at the Congregational
Church, 7:00 P.M.
Tea at the Guild House every Tuesday, 4:30 to
6:00 P.M.
Mid-Week Meditation in Douglas Memorial
Chapel, Thursday, 5:00 P.M.
Friday, September 17 at 6:00 P.M.-There will
be a complimentary supper for new students
STUDENT CENTER ... 524 Thompson
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Sue Gillespie, Associate
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Pastor and Student Coun-
selor
Friday, September 23 -
8:00 P.M.-Party and Square Dance for new
students.
Sunday, September 25 -
9:45 A.M.-Church School, Student Class in
Guild House, 502 East Huron;
11:00 A.M.-Church Worship
6:45 P.M.-A discussion group by the Roger
William Guild introducing the group to the
new students.
Welcome to all freshmen.
Our Church needs you and you need our Church.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Stte and Huron Streets, Phone NO 2-1121
William C. Bennet, Pastor.
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship Service
7:00 P.M.-Evening Worship Service
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.-Prayer Meeting.
A warm welcome awaits you here. Come and hear
the word of God.
THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY in Ann Arbor
presents a series of informal talks on Theoso-
phy every Thursday at 7:30 P.M. at 6561
Warren Rd. If interested call Miss Neutz, NO
2-6295, 736 S. State St., for reservation or
transportation.
Public is cordially invited.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street, Phone NO 3-4129
Dr. Herman Jacobs, Director
Ivan Bender, president of student community
Prof. William Haber, chairman, Advisory Com-
m ittee
Wednesday, September 21-
Make reservation for Oneg Shabbat on Friday,
and Freshman Brunch on Sunday at the Hillel'
table at registration.
Thursday, September 22-
Newcomers get-acquainted coke hour from 3 to
5 p.m. All Hillel student government mem-
bers will be on hand to greet new students.
Friday, September 23-
6:00 P.M.-Sabbath Dinner
7:30 P.M.-Services followed by Oneg Shabbat
Saturday, September 24-
9:00 A.M.-Morning Services
4:00 P.M.-Open House Preview followed by a
Havdalah Service
Suniay, September 25-
10:30 A.M.-Freshman Brunch
7 to 10:30 P.M.-Open House and mixer.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephanou
9:30-Matins Service.
10:30-Divine Liturgy.
11:00-Greek Sermon.
12:00-English Sermon.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST

530 West Stadium
(Formerly at -Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M., Bible Study, G. Wheel-
er Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work, Sundays 1 to 1:30 P.M.

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Anytime is coffee time at the
University.
Students begin hurrying to the
League, Union, local restaurants
and drug stores early in the morn-
ing, and continue this "extra-
curricular" activity far into the
night.
The "coffee break and "coffee,
date" have become campus insti-
tutions.
"Kill Time"
Some people kill time and inci-
dentally occupy themselves while
their coffee is cooling, by practic-
ing covering the liquid with a
layer of cream.
This feat is accomplished by
dripping cream on a spoon held
just above the coffee against the
inside rim of the cup.
To most University students, as
to most Americans, coffee is either
drunk in its undiluted form or
with cream,tsugar or a combina-
tion of both.
College Night
To Be Held
In Schools
In conjunction with College
Night, during which all the schools
and colleges of the University pre-
sent programs in honor of the
incoming freshmen and transfer
students during Orientation Week,
the School of Education will have
an informal "get-together."
The program, featuring a talk
by Prof. Howard McCluskey on
"The Role of the Teacher in Soci-
ety," will be held at 8 p.m. on
Wednesday, Sept. 21, at the Uni-
versity High School auditorium.
Faculty members and members
and officers of the Education
School Council will be introduced.
There will be an explanation of
the work of the Council and plans
for the coming year.
Refreshments will be served and
at the informal gathering, will be
an opportunity to talk with the
faculty and Council members.
The program 1 especially for
freshmen and transfer students, in
addition to all other students,
planning to enter education school
this f all.
All education school students
are welcome to get acquainted
with the newcomers.

Students Make Habit
Of 'Coffee Breaks'

i

In other countries, however,
coffee is prepared in what would
seem here to be elaborate forms.
"Cafe au lait" is prepared by
pouring coffee and hot milk sim-
ultaneously into a cup, making a
more nourishing drink.
Another French concoction is
especially suited for warm weather.
One egg is added to every six
cups of "cafe noir." The mixture
is then sweetened and frozen until
it attains the consistency of rich,
thick cream.
"Cafe a la Creme"
"Cafe a la creme" is prepared
by covering the black coffee with
a mound of whipped cream. This
is one of the favorite breakfast
drinks of the French.
Voltaire and Napoleon favored
a drink of coffee and milk with a
quantity of chocolate.
Many of the Turks are a great
deal ahead of students in any
coffee drinking race, since they
often consume 25 cups each day.
Muddy and Sweet
To keep the supply near at
hand, the "brew" is sold by ven-
dors in the streets. Turkish coffee
is muddy and sweet, and should be
sipped to allow the finely pulver-
ized grounds to settle to the bot-
tom of the cup.
Russian coffee makers mix their
coffee at parties to add an extra
"bang." Coffee is put into a punch
bowl and covered with a layer of
finely chopped apples and pears.
Intothis is poured some cognac,
and then a match is applied, to
give the drink the "extra finishing
touch."
In former times, the Russian
aristocracy squeezed lemon juice
into a strong coffee preparation
while on the other side of the
ocean, Mexicans enjoy their cof-
fee sweetened by a brown sugar
stick.
Union Dance
The Michigan Union will hold
the first of its Saturday night
dances from 9 p.m. to midnight
on Sept. 24.
Open to Union members and
their dates, the dance will fea-
ture the music of Red Johnson
and his orchestra.
An informal atmosphere pre-
vails ,with heels and "dressy"
dresses being standard wear for
coeds. These dances are held
every Saturday night, whenever
there is not some other big
event on campus.

Counselors
Give Advice
On Careers
Service Furnishes
Vocational Guidance,
Business Field Merits
By JAN JAGUSCH
Uncertainty about the choice of
a career or the relative merits of
various business fleids need no
longer be a problem for the Uni-
versity student.
The counseling division of the
Bureau of Psychological Services
is available to help solve dilemmas
of this type.
This vocational guidance serv-
ice is unique on campus and is
also free of charge. The confused
student can set the machinery in
motion by just making an appoint-
ment at the Rackham offices of
the counseling service.
First Step
The first step in the program
includes a 10 minute interview
with a staff psychologist to de-
termine the extent of the problem,
and whether it would be best
handled in these offices or at
another campus agency.
The student is then placed on a
waiting list until he has the oppor-
tunity for an hour interview with
a counselor. At this time the stu-
dent and his advisor decide whe-
ther tests will be practical for the
solution of the problem, and if so,
what typeswill be best suited for
the purpose.
After the tests the counselor
and student meet for an interpre-
tation of the results, using as many
interviews as are deemed neces-
sary to reach an adequate solu-
tion.
Long Waiting List
Because of the policy of taking
as much time with the student as
he needs, a long waiting list has
been built up.
Also included in the services of
the office is a collection of voca-
tional literature which is avail-
able at all times without appoint-
ment.
All the student has to do is
browse in the office to learn about
such things as: job possibilities,
business trends, salaries, and the
preparation needed for specific
professions.
If the desired information is not
found by the student, the office
will be glad to obtain it for him.
Miss Mary Eaton, psychometrist
at the Bureau, will discuss and
interpret the information for any
student who desires*additional
help.
Library Hours
The General Library and its
! numerous divisional libraries
hold regular hours throughout
the year: Monday through Fri-
day, 8 a.m. to 5 pm.; Monday
through Thursday, 7 p.m. to 10
p.m and Saturday 8 a.m. to
noon.
In addition the Business Ad-
ministration Library is open
from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Sun-
days. The other divisional li-
braries include education, nat-
ural resouces, natural science,
'social science, fine arts, musi
and engineering.

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THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman. Minister

11 PEEDE'i D CC VT IA \!h"i i n "ILA

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