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October 07, 1955 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-10-07

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1955

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ONE HOUR A YEAR:
Desire To Teach Unfulfilled by President Hatcher

Reading Difficulties
Sometimes Inherited

WESTMINSTER

By DICK SNYDER
Once each year in Prof. Ben-
nett Weaver's English Bible class,
students hear a guest lecture -
the only one which President Har-
lan Hatcher finds time to give
during his duties as the Univer-
sity's top admninistrator.
"Naturally, I would like to de-
vote more than just this one hour
a year to teaching," says the for-
mer Ohio State English professor,
"but I guess I will have to list
this as an unfulfilled desire."
Since leaving his post as vice-
president of Ohio State in 1951
to become the eighth president of
Michigan, the 57-year-old educa-
tor, scholar and writer has found
himself assuming more and .more
of "the ever-growing responsibili-
ties connected with an ever-grow-,
ing university.
"However," he smiles, "I enjoy
it immensely."
Had Many Friends Here
Dr. Hatcher had many acquaint-
ances here while still at Ohio
State and had heard more than
a little of the University's stand-
ing in the educational field.
"Now after living at the heart
and center of it for four years, I
find it living up to all advance
notices.
"And yet," he adds; "I have dis-
covered many areas of strength
and greatness I had no way of
knowing before."
Terming Michigan a "model
state university," President Hatch-
er says, "The people of this state
have cherished and supported their
leading educational institution
better than has any other state.
An indefinable distinction is at-
tached to both faculty and pro-
gram here."
Praises Intellectual Inquiry
Comparing the University with
the often referred to "neighbors
to the northwest," he finds that
"one of our most precious aspects
is the intellectual inquiry which
takes place.
"On my first visit, I sensed a
different atmosphere-subtle, elu-
sive, yet signifying in a real sense
that this is an important institu-
tion."
During four years at Michigan,
JJr. Hatcher has announced plans
for physical expansion of the Uni-
versity-both on the present cam-
pus and on the new North Cam-
pus.
He has seen the Phoenix Project
campaign top its goal by more
than a million dollars. Use of
money from this memorial fund
has brought acclaim to the Uni-

OFFICIAL ASSISTANTS-Assisted by his children, Anne Linda,
9, and Robert Leslie, 11, University President Harlan Hatcher,
author of several books, catches up on some .of his writing at

his education at Ohio State Uni-
versity. He received a Doctor of
Philosophy, degree there in 1927,
did post doctoral work at the Uni-
versity of Chicago and spent some
time in England, France and Italy,
during his studies.
Formerly OSU Veep
He advanced from instructor to
assistant professor to professor of
English at Ohio State. In 1944
he became dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences and in 1948 was
chosen vice-president. '
The nationally-known educa-
tional leader has received honor-
ary degrees from Michigan as well
as Bowling Green State, Butler,
Miami, Ohio State and Ohio Wes-
leyan Universities; the Universi-
ties of Akron; Cincinnati, Ken-
tucky, Pittsburgh, and Toleda, Al-
bion and Michigan State Colleges
and the College of Wooster.
The greying University President
modestly describes his interest in
education as "natural."
Interested in Great Lakes
Probably Dr. Hatcher's most
noted hobby is centered around his
interest in the history and de-
velopment of the region of the
Great Lakes.
This enthusiastic interest has led
to the publication of several well-
received books on his native state
of Ohib and the surrounding re-
gion ,including "The Buckeye
Country;" "The Great Lakes,"
"Lake Erie," 'The Western Re-
serve" and "A Century of Iron
and Men."
. "During my first years at Mi-
chigan, the publishers of 'The
Great Lakes,' a story of the great
heartland of America, tried to get
me to revise and continue the
book. They finally became either
discouraged at or more under-
standing of my new time-consum-
ing activities."
His interest in the Great Lakes
region has led to a growing asso-
ciatiQn with the St. Lawrence Sea-
way Commission.
Remembering another associa-
tion-his long association with
Ohio State-the President con-
sented to make a prediction on
the outcome of this fall's Michi-
gan-OSU football game.
"My first year here I saw us
wallop my former associates, and
the next year when we journeyed
*to Columbus the tables were turn-
ed. Last year and the year be-'
fore, too, the games were won by
the team playing on its own
field."
With a twinkle in his eye, Dr.
Hatcher concluded optimistically,
"Michigan's at home this year!"

home.
versity for its research on peace-
ful purposes of atomic energy.
'U' Advances in Many Fields
Under his direction, the Uni-
versity has advanced in etjuca-
tional developments including ex-
panded curriculums, new programs
in foreign studies and an increase
in use of educational television.
He points to "the increased stu-
dent participation in what had
previously been one-sided deci-
sions." He is particularly en-
thusiastic over student-faculty-ad-
ministration committees on mat-
ters such as plans for the Student
Activities Building and calendar
change proposals.
Cites New Office
He believes "real progress has
been made in the area of student-
administration relationships by
the appointment of Mr. Lewis as
Vice-President for Student Af-
fairs.
Discussing the much-debated is-
sue of size of a university, Presi-
dent Hatcher emphasizes that
"the University's first job should
be to preserve the present educa-
tional qualities. We must be

aware that there is no particular
virtue in size.
"But, let us realize that Michi-
gan .at every stage of its existence
has been one of the largest insti-
tutions in the country. At the
same time it has been one of the
best."
"When thinking of size, we must
first visualize qualified students
and qualified faculty, and then
physical plant. Since 'there is no
evidence to suggest that there is
a shortage of the first two items,
we must plan for expansion of the
third."
Administrative Setup Decides
The President emphasizes that
the decentralized administration,
with a majority of the responsi-
bility on the deans of the indivi-
dual schools at the University,
plays the decisive role in the mat-
ter of size.
"For instance,' if the Law School
reaches an enrollment beyond
which, in its dean's opinion, a de-
cline will take place in quality of
education, then we will hold en-
rollment at this point."
Dr. Hatcher was born in Iron-
ton, Ohio, and received most of

Some children may have inher-
ited an inability to read.
"Familial Reading Disability,"
by Dr. Arthur L. Drew, associate
professor of neurology at The Uni-
versity Medical School, in the cur-
rent issue of the U-M Medical Bul-
letin, provides some evidence for
inherited reading difficulties.
Some children, as well as ad-
ults, are poor readers because of
obvious brain' damage, according
to Dr. Drew.
But, he declares, after the ac-
quired cases are accounted for,
such as result from wounds, in-
fections, and nerve center degen-
eration, there are those poor read-
ers who seem to run in families.
The neurologist suspects fam-
ily influence in certain types of
problematic reading, and he sup-
ports the growing view that some
reading difficulties are geneti-
cally determined.
Dr. Drew feels that not enough
emphasis has been placed on the
neurological implications of poor
reading.
He writes, "The current tenden-
cy in this country appears to be
to view reading as a pedagogic,
psychiatric or psychological phen-
omenon in some way unrelated to
the central nervous system."
Mauer Talks
On 'Ginimick'
Professor Wesley H. Maurer,
chairman of the Journalism de-
partment spoke to the Bay City
Kiwanis club yesterday of the
danger of "mis-informing" news-
papers.
Mauer said, "Newspapers whose
columns are filled with trivia,
calamities, crime and yokel gim-
micks, sold under the false label
of 'news of our times', are leading
their readers into the calamitous
position of being unable to accept
change."
Maurer felt that basic to all the
function of the newspaper in the
community were the protection
and extension of our liberties, the
fostering of peace, and the nour-
ishing of good will.
"The newspaper," he said, "in
reporting the affairs of courts,
governments, schools, churches,
industries, and recreations, pre-
pares us for the understanding and
acceptance of social routines
which guarantee peace."
Peace and good will, he stated,
are fostered by the honest pre-
sentation of facts, information,
and insights which explain and
provide for peaceful adaptation to
inevitable changes in our society.
"If we are misinformed or even
inadequately appraised of signifi-
cant happenings, our security is
threatened."
The knowledgeable editor, he
said, encourages peace and good
will through the accentuation of
the positive, the significant, the
normal, the good and the fine.
"Fortunate, indeed," he stated,
"is the community whose news-
papers report honestly and com-
petently what is truly happening
to us and to our brothers.
"For it is through this service
that we not only can save our-
selves but guide our own destiny
as well."
Field To Head ;
Panel Discussion
Professor John V. Field of the
Journalism department will head
a panel discussion of ."Problems
of School Publications" at the
Michigan Education Association
convention in Marquette today.

Some reading experts, states Dr.
Drew, even go so far as to dis-
miss heredity entirely as a factor
in poor reading. In so doing,
however, these specialists fail to
provide a suitable explanation for
the existence of reading handicaps
which crop up in families.
Dr. Drew describes a family situ-
ation in which there were three
cases of serious reading disability,
a father and his two sons. De-
spite remarriage by the father
before the birth of the second
son, the three males exhibited ser-
ious reading handicaps.
Dr. Drew says, "The 23-year
old son was barely literate, and the
father and the 16-year old son
were almost totally unable to
read."
Tests showed that the subjects
were normal mentally, and that
there was no evidence of nervous
system disease.
Davis Notes
Enrollment
Diversities
A total of 1,226 students from
70 separate political entities are
enrolled at the University, accord-
ing to James M. Davis, director of
the International Center.
This is an increase of more than
12 per cent over the 1954 total,
Davis pointed out.
"The sharpest increase is in
students from the Far East, par-
ticularly from Burma and Ko-
rea," stated Davis. He noted
large increases in the numbers of
students coming from the British
Commonwealth, Near East, and
Latin America
There are less students from
Europe and Africa, declared Davis,
while students from Saudi Ara-
bia and Nepal were present for
the first time in several years.
In spite of the housing prob-
lem, Davis commented, all except
15 of the students have found
permanent accommodations.
Canada has the largest number
of students with 233, followed by
India, 88; China, 80; Philippines,
59; Turkey, 54; Japan, 46; Vene-
zuela, 46; Korea, 39; Iraq 37, and
Germany, 37
Shiel Explains
Permit Issue
Francis C. Shiel, manager of
Service Enterprises, said the Uni-
versity makes no differentiation
between academic and non-aca-
demic personnel in the issuance
fof parkingpermits for University
'cotroledspace.
All full-time employes, regard-
less of position, are eligible for
permits. In practice, Shiel said,
more permits are issued than there
are actual spaces, thus getting
maximum use of the space by al-
lowing for turnover.. Two choices
in parking space are offered, the
20 dollar annual permit and a per-
mit allowing parking in metered
spaces.
As explained by Shiel, there is
no priority or system of prefer-
ences set down by the University
which would dictate to whom the
permits go.
E

RAVEL: Bolero, La Valse

TCHAIKOVSKY:

Romeo and Juliet, Marche Slav,
"1812" Overture

LISZT: Les Preludes, Mazeppa

DEBUSSY:

La Mer, Iberia

CESAR FRANCK: Symphony in D Minor, Le
Chasseur Maudit

VIVALDI:

Four Concerti, Gloria

BEETHOVEN: Symphonies Nos. 2, 4, 5 and 8
DVORAK: Symphony No. 5 in E Minor,
("New World")
CHOPIN: Concertos No. 1, and No.2 for Piano
SCHUMANN: Concerto in A Minor
BACH, J. S.: Concerto No. 1, Concerto No 2
for Violin
ISAAK, H.: Choral Music

HI-Fl

2.991

LP's

SCH UBERT:

Piano Sonata in A Minor, Piano Sonata
in E Flat'Major

SCARLATTI: Sonatas for Harpsichord

WILBYE:

Madrigals

I.

VAUGHAN AWILLIAMS: The Wasps, Old King Cole
RIMSKY-KORSAKOFF: Scheherazade
CHARPENTIER: Midnight Mass
BACH: English Suites, French Suites
CRESTON: Symphony No. 1, No. 2
RESPIGHI: Pines of Rome, Fountains of Rome
MOZART: Concerto for Piano No. 21 in C Major
and 26 "Coronation" -
BRAHMS: Symphony No. 1
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 6
PROKOFIEFF: Scythian Suite
BACH: Cantata 140 "Sleepers Awake"
TEJERA: Joys and Sorrows of Andalucia
BEETHOVEN:. Concerto No. 4
"CANTE FLAME NCO" Anthology-Vol. 1 and Vol. 2
BEETHOVEN: Sonatas-"Appassionata,"
"Moonlight," "Pathetique"
RIMSKY-KORSAKOFF: The Great Russian Easter,
"Antar" Symphonic Suite
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 7
HAYDN: Symphonies Nos. 95 and 100
MOZART: Piano Concertos Nos. 19 and 20
BEETHOVEN: Concerto No. 5 ("Emperor")
BACH': Brandenburg Concertos
SCHUMANN: Liederkreis, Frauenliebe und Leben

U

s

0

0

LOOK AT ALL THE CHECKERED FLAGS
CHEVROLET'S COLLECTED!
Drive with care...EVERYWHEREI

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CINCINNATI, 0.
FLAT ROCK, MICH.
JEFFERSONVILLE, IND.
DARLINGTON, S.C.
HAMMOND, IND.
DETROIT, MICH.
The safer car wins.a
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the winning car
NOW'S THE TIME TO BUYI
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Evey checkered flag signals a
Chevrolet victory in official 1955 stock car
competition-not only against its own field
but against many American and foreign
high-priced cars, tool

Let's translate these victories into
your kind of driving. You've got to-
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the tracks. And that means safer
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No lonesome tlefcovers:
when
ou
Why send out mis-matched
'letters (they make a poor
impression), when you can
always match paper and
envelopes with Eaton's,
.'Open Stock. They're pack.'
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