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October 05, 1955 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-10-05

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILYa

12Aiv

_~

VAUEHRE

Podres Sets Down

Yanks in Final Game of Series

Hodges Drives in Both Runs;
Amoros Stars Defensively

(Continued from Page 1)
and losing pool was just about
$100,000.
Podres Holds
Time after time it seemed the
Yanks must break through Podres,
working with three days rest after
his fine third-game victory.
In the third inning the Yanks
suffered a cruel break when, with
Phil Rizzuto on second and Bil-
ly Martin on first, McDougald
grounded to third. Rizzuto, slid-
ing into third under the threat
of a force play, was hit by the ball
for an automatic out.
A fielding lapse by the Dodgers
opened the gates again in the
fourth when Duke Snider, going
after Yogi Berra's high y, was
scared off by the charging Gilliam
from left. Snider held up at the
last second, letting the ball drop
untouched for a freak double.
Yanks Fail Again
Once again the Yanks were un-
able to jam through the opening
as Hank Bauer, Bill .Skowronand
Bob Cerv went down in order.
Still the Yanks kept coming
back, nibbling at Podres but never
able to get a full slice of him.
Rizzuto,.playing a record-break-
ing 52nd series game, opened the
eighth with a single. After Martin
flied out, McDougald bounced a
single off Don Hoak's shoulder at
third. But Berra lifted a soft fly
to right with Rizzuto forced to
hold third. Hank Bauer struck out.
Byrne didn't allow a hit until
the fourth. Then Campanella, who
had gone 0 to 12 in the Stadium,
slammed a double to left. Furillo
was thrown out by Rizzuto, Campy
moving to third. Hodges then lined
a1-2 pitch into left for the first
big run.
Skowron Errors
Brooklyn almost broke the game
wide open in the sixth. Reese

opened with a single and the
Yanks' Skowron let Byrne's peg
get away from him for an error
as he tried to tag the bunting
Snider.
Campanella also bunted, moving
up the runners with his sacrifice.
Manager Casey Stengel ordered
Byrne to fill the bases with an in-
tentional pass to Furillo. Bob Grim
succeeded Byrne. Hodges drove a
deep fly to Bob Cerv in center and
Reese romped home easily. That
ended all the scoring.
Finally

A TO, LCA,
Beat Foes
In IwM11Play
By ED BERNREUTER
Launching this season's social
fraternity touch football compet-
ition, Alpha Tau Omega turned
in a smashing 29 to six victory
over a hapless Trigon seven.
Charlie Gunn was almost the
whole show for ATO, as he went
over twice and threw touchdown
passes to Tom Boyle and Bill
Booth for two more.
Lambda Chi Alpha also had a
field day, while swamping Theta
Xi, 27-0. Most of the scoring took
place in the second half, with Hal.
Cruger and Fran LeMire each tos-
sing two touchdown passes.
One Score Enough
With only thirty seconds re-
maining to be played Chi Psi man-
aged to put across their only
touchdown, which gave them a
7-0 victory over Sigma Phi Epsi-
lon. Both squads showed a strong
defense through almost the en-]

BROOKLYN AB R
.Gilliam, if, 2b ..4 0
Reese, ss .......4 1
Snider, cf ......3 0
Campanella, c ..3 1
Furillo, rf ......3 0
Hodges, lb .....2 0
Hoak, 3b........3 0
Zimmer, 2b ....2 0
a Shuba ....... 0
Amoros, if .....0 0
Podres, p ....,...4 0
Totals......29 2
NEW YORK AB R
Rizzuto, ss ......3 0
Martin, 2b ......3 0
McDougald, 3b ..4 0
Berra, c ........4 0
Bauer, rf.......4 0
Skowron, 1b ....4 0
Cerv, cf........4 0
Howard, If .....4 0
Byrne, p ...2 0
Grim, p ......0 0
b Mantle ......1 0
Turley, p .......0 0
Totals .......33 0
a Grounded out for Zi
6th

O A
2 0
2 6
2 0
5 0
3 0
10 0
1 1
0 2
0 .0
2 1
0 1
27 11
O A
1 3
1 6
1 1
4 1
1 0
11 1
5 0
2 0
0 2
1 0
0 0
0 0
27 14

Wolverines
Rate Second
In Grid Poll,
By The Associated Press
Maryland, well out in front in.
the national football ratings after1
only three games, faces a real bat-1
tle from here on.
It isn't the battle to win games
that troubles Jim Tatum's mighty;
Terrapins, but one to avoid being
forgotten.
The Terps have finished the
toughest part of their schedule-
Missouri, UCLA and Baylor-in a
gratifying fashion. From now on
they'll play mostly in their own
Atlantic Coast Conference witha
two outside games that apparent-
ly didn't pose any serious prob-
lems. And in the ACC, still so
young that there's no round-robin
schedule or official championship,
Maryland doesn't meet its most
important rival, Duke.
Meanwhile Michigan, a solid
second in this week's AssociatedI
Press poll of sports writers and}
broadcasters, takes on sixth-rated
Army Saturday, then plunges into
the Big Ten title race, where every
game is a tough one and each vic-
tory makes a big impression.
So far Maryland has been suf-
ficiently impressive that the Terps
garnered 88 of 185 first place votes
and a total of 1,568 points to
Michigan's 27 firsts and 1,223
points. Oklahoma, with 13 firsts
and 1,146 points, edged out Geor-
gia Tech for third place with No-1
tre Dame, Army, UCLA, Texas
Christian, Wisconsin and South-
ern California completing the top
ten.
L i k e Maryland, Oklahoma's
Sooners will be hard pressed to
remain in the spotlight. They
play Texas, always rugged.
Team W L F Tot.

NEW YORK OP-The Brooklyn
Dodgers cut loose Tuesday in their
dressing room after winning the
World Series as no other baseball
club has done in recent years.
There was shouting and back-
pounding. cheering and smiles,
hand shaikng and embracing --
Tennis Entries
This Thursday evening the
entries for the men's tennis
tournament close. E nt r i e s
should be handed in at the I-M
office.
and it was spontaneous, genuine,
and totally unabashed.
Heroes Singled Out
Five heroes were singled out:
Johnny Podres, the superb pitcher;
Sandy Amoros, whose catch of

Dodgers Show Exuberance
After First Series Victory

Yogi Berra's high pop to left field
corner saved the day when he
turned it into a double play; Gil
Hodges, who drove in the two all-
important Dodger runs; Manager
Walt Alston, who did what no
other Brooklyn manager could do
in winning baseball's biggest prize;
and Duke Snider, the slugging
center field star.
"That Podres - that Amoros,"
catcher Roy Campanella shouted.
"He never shook me off on any-
thing I called for all day except
the last pitch of the game .I
wanted a fast ball. He wanted a
change-up."
Campanella roared with laugh-
ter. A changeup it was, and Elston
Howard grounded out to Reese.
Read The Classifieds

BILL KOLESAR, the Wolverines' second string tackle, will be
sidelined for the remainder of the season with a bad knee.
With Kolesar out, the tackle positions, rated as Michigan's
weakest position, will probably be further weakened.
Eleven Prenae o

tre game.
Another shut-out game was Phi .
Delta Theta's 14-0 defeat of DeltaI
Upsilon. The DU's showed little,
spark offensivly but put on a

immer in

b Popped out for Grim in 7th.'

pretty fair defensive performance, By TOM BEIRLE
as they held the Phi Delts to two The injury-riddled Wolverine
TD's. Pete Tillotson and Andy gridders yesterday started an all-
Samosuk did the scoring. out preparation for the invasion
Tau Delts Win of the Black Knights from West
Earl Terman's pass to Aaron Point this Saturday.
Podhurst in the closing minutes One of the biggest jobs was test-
Iing replacements for tackle Bill
All men interested in Fresh- Kolesar who suffered a bad knee
man basketball please report to injury- in the Michigan State
the I-M building today at 3:30 game. The injury, "which will
p.m. Please bring own equip- more than likely require surgery"
ment. according to trainer Jim Hunt,
-Dave Strack will sideline Kolesar for the season.
The tackles, regarded as Michi-
gan's weakest link at the beginning
gave Tau Delta Phi a 6-0 win over of the season will be considerably
Kappa Sigma. Both squads showed weakened by the loss of Kolesar
some defensive power, but Tau who was one of two lettermen
Delta Phi applied their scoring guards returning.
might at the most opportune time. Replaced by Heynen
Beta Theta Pi outplayed Phi Playing number two man behind
Kappa Sigma as they posted an Jim Orwig, Kolesar will be re-
18-6 win. placed by Dick Heynen with Carl
Other games found Alpha Epsi- Kamhout moving up behind Hey-
Ion Pi just edging past Phi Kappa nen.
Tau, 7-0. Theta Delta Chi also End Tom Maentz continued
won a close 7-0 decision over Delta working out with the squad as
Kappa Elsilon. the reserves ran Army plays

against the varsity defense. Oos-
terbaan indicated he is just wait-
ing for the doctor's OK and that
Maentz should be ready to go
against Northwestern, and might
possibly see action against Army.
Jim VanPelt is another question
mark in the varsity lineup and is
awaiting the doctor's verdict as
to how soon his knee will be in
shape.
Baldacci Watches
The other battered and bruised
Wolverines should be well enough
healed to see action Saturday. Lou
Baldacci, limping slightly, watch-
ed Dave Hill, Ed Shannon, and
Earl Johnson work from the full-
back position during yesterday's
drills.
Jim Bates and Jerry Goebel,
number one and two centers re-
spectively, both were at practice
despite badly banged up legs and
ankles. Halfback Terry Barr,
sporting a badly bruised shoulder
will also be ready to go against
the boys from the banks of the
Hudson.

Brooklyn ... 000
New York ... 000

101 000-2
000 000-0

'I

Maryland ......3
Michigan ......2
Oklahoma .......2
Georgia Tech ..3
Notre Dame ....2
Army.. 2
UCLA....... ...2
Texas Christian 3
Wisconsin ......2
Southern Calif. .3

0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0

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11
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1146
1108
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FACULTY AND
ADMINISTRATION

i
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STUDENTS

Second Ten

A NEW OPPORTUNITY TO READ
"All The News That's Fit to Print"
in
The New York Times
at
SPECIAL CAMPUS RATES
for the entire University community
DELIVERED to you the SAME MORNING
it's printed in New York!
DAILY AIR EDITION
of the New York Times
Delivered right to your dorm desk or University Department
desk between 8:00 and 9:00 A.M. the same morning it's
printed. Newsstand daily rate 7c per copy. COST TO
YOU--5c.,
Subscriptions this semester:
Monday through Saturday-67 copies ............... $3.35
Special! Every Monday (when there's no Michigan Daily)
12 copies . ......... ....... $.60
Look at the New York Times in the Library and then subscribe
THE SUNDAY NEW YORK TIMES
Brought to you hours earlier than ever before in Ann Ar-
bor . . . between 1:30 and 3:30 every Sunday afternoon.
DELIVERED TO YOUR DOORSTEP within 1 mile of
campus, or room in men's residence hall per copy-only 30c
1 1copies-3.30
In a women's residence hall-delivered to the desk
per copy-25c
11 copies-2.75
Here's America's greatest Sunday newspaper, including sepa.
rate sections for the main news, drama - music - art -
travel; business and finance; sports; news of the week in re-
view; the Times book review; Times Magazine; and more!
Delivery of all subscriptions commences Monday, October 10.
Prices quoted do not include the examination and vacation
periods. Full school year subscriptions are available. The New
York Herald Tribune is also available at 7c per copy and on
Sunday at the same prices as the New York Times.
r, .- - - - - - - ---- - - - -..-..--... _ ..,. .- ._ ... .. ...,. ...._
Cut out & Send Subscription Order to: Enclosed Find1
GERARD SMETANA Q Check or Money Order 1
STUDENT NEWSPAPER AGENCY Payable to Student 1
551 SOUTH STATE ST. Cespaper Agency
ANN ARBOR, MICH. O Please Bill Me1
I would like to have the following editions of the New York
Times delivered to me beginning Monday, October 10th' ctthese1
Ispecial Campus Rates.
COLLEGE YEAR
SEMESTER Excluding Summer
nl 3.35 Daily Air Edijtio~n. MondrA,,... tk. Z,.f,. 7 Sts. 1 n-

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ED MEADS

11

West Virginia ..2
Navy ..........2
Duke .........2
Auburn ........2
Miami (Fla.) ...1
Clemson .....3
Purdue .........2
Washington ....3
Kentuck ......2
Stanford ...... .2

0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1

13 380
289
3 176
66
61
55
26
1 24
22
16

'
F

By DAVE GREY
"Ed Meads is a fine, dependable
leader, and a good all-around line-
man."
These straightforward words
from Head Coach Bennie Ooster-
baan tell the spirit behind Michi-
gan's 1955 football captain. The
modest, respect-gaining guard
from Oxford, Mich., follows in the
recent tradition of fine Wolverine
center-of-the-line captains.
Week's Grid Picks
Entries for this week's grid pick
contest must be mailed or handed
in by 5 p.m. Thursday evening.
Address entries to "Grid Picks,"
The Michigan Daily, Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, or bring them
to the main desk of the second
floor of the Publications Building.
This week's 15 top football tilts:

Center Dick O'Shaughnesy was1
captain-elect in 1953, while scrap-
py Ted Cachey led the 1954 squad
from the guard position.
Sets Fine Example
Meads, a *21-year-old senior in
Lit. School, is not what one would
term as a "colorful" player; his
strength lies in his determination
and ability to set a fine example
for others. He moves equally well
to the.left or right and is con-
sistently good on both offense and
defense.
Originally a guard on the fresh-.
man team, Meads was switched
over to the tackle slot in his
sophomore year and then back to
guard, where he saw 306 minutes
of action as a junior. This time-
played total ranked him third-high
on Michigan behind Ron Kramer
and stalwart tackle Art Walker.
Meads' rise in status as a varsity
lineman is an unusual one, con-
sidering that he broke his arm as
a freshman and practiced only
eight days that season.
Pre-Med Student
A four sport man - football,
basketball, baseball, and track -
in high school, Meads has always
dreamed of attending Michigan
and studying to be a doctor. He
needed little coaxing from his
father, a former 'M' man him-
self and now a dentist. Meads

plans to enter Medical School here
next year.
It took the clean-cut, 195-
pounder little time to fit into the
Michigan tradition. Schooled in
the fundamentals of the T-forma-
tion, Meads made the necessary
switch over to the single wing. He
now swears by the latter system as
coached by Oosterbaan as being
more powerful.
He does admit, however, "It
takes longer to master the tech-
niques in the single wing." He
believes that this is one reason
that the Wolverine coaches do not
usually play too many sophomores.
Praise for Coaches
As a representative of the 1955
team, Meads has nothing but
praise for all his coaches. Ap-
proximately 80 per cent of his
personal teaching came from Line
Coach Jack Blott, who is " . .
tops in my book .. . He gives you
a chance to prove yourself."
He strongly feels that the next
game coming up is going to be the
toughest. "Each weekend is really
a battle."
As a seasoned veteran, he has
also learned to be basely con-
scious of 97,000 excited fans and
that the other team on the field
is the only object. Press writers'
"thoughts of Rose Bowls" are only
words.

CHUCK MEYERS
and his Orchesfra
Available for your
dancing pleasure
Phone Ypsilanti 3384M

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New York

- _

IF,

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Army at lichigan
Cornell at Harvard
Indiana at Iowa
Georgia at Louisiana State
Notre Dame at Miami
Stanford at Michigan State
Pitt at Navy
Minnesota at Northwestern
Illinois at Ohio State
Wisconsin at Purdue
Clemson at Rice
Missouri at Southern Metho-
dist.
Oregon State at UCLA
Southern Cal. at Washington
Mississippi at Vanderbilt

It's Clear Cut that the
Crew Cut is the Mode
" FLATTOPS
" CREWS
" PRINCETONIANS
" COLLEGIANS
The Daseola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

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