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September 30, 1955 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EIGHT

Tm- MICMGAN DAILY

to VI ASS cwuv w"'art OA *AL4

EIH HEMCIGA AL

RIDFAY, SEPTMBER 30 19~35

iATERMAN'S BOOK:
Says Christ Answer to World Problems

3

By ETHEL KOVITZ
"Men have never learned to live
together -- only to conquer those
they don't like," said Prof. Leroy
Waterman, professor emeritus of
semitics.
"Unless men find the solution
to problems -of human relation-
ship, civilization has no hope," he
continued. "With atomic power
we will destroy ourselves."
In his latest book, "The Histori-
ed-A Aesus - Hope of Mankind,"
Prof. waterman suggests looking
to the teachings of Christ for the
answer to mankind's problems.
Only Solution
"He is the only person who has
presented a solution to the prob-
lems of human relationships.
Other religions do not hope for a
reign of God on earth. They are
all hopeless about scolving the
problems of human life and look
to a reign of God only in after-
life."
"Confucious believed that by
good education people could be
taught to live in harmony," Prof.
Waterman continued. "But he

PROF. WATERMAN

never
would
did."

furnished a formula that
bring this about, as Christ

"Jesus makes great demands on
man' in human relations. Man
must live by the theory that every
person is his neighbor. In the

New Student Relations Group
Discusses Proposed Charter
4

New Testament this theory is
made universal; it does not apply
only to the chosen people, as in
the old testament."
Starts Publication
In his book, beginning publi-
cation today, Prof. Waterman also
stresses understanding the Histor-
ical Jesus -- "the person as he
lived."
"Many scholars would say that
one can't get to the historical
Jesus because he's buried under
conceptions formed. after his
death," Prof. Waterman said.
However, he believes it is essen-
tial to find the real person be-
cause until then "there will be no
agreement among Christians as to
what his requirements are."
"All sects think they're right,"
he said. "Yet since they differ
so, they can't all be right. We
must find the answer in Christ's
own words and deeds. As it stands
now his words are contradictory."
Universal God
Of the different conceptions,
Prof. Waterman favors the idea of
"a universal righteous and loving
God in contrast to a stern God."
Since 1945 Prof. Waterman has
been a University extension lec-
turer on the Bible. He was also
one of the translators of the Re-
vised Standard Version of the
Bible and the author of several
books.
This fall Prof. Waterman will
teach an extension course entitled
"The Bible Within the Bible."
Opening session is scheduled for
7:30 p.m. on Monday, October 3.
Classes will be held in Rm. 131 of
the School of Business Adminis-
tration Building.
Teachers Leave
For Higher Pay
INDIANAPOLIS (IP) - Low sal-
aries, a too-heavy load of extra-
curricular duties, and lack of job
security were given as the main
reasons for quitting by school
teachers who left the profession
last year, the State Department
of Public Instruction said yester-
day.
Answers given in a survey con-
ducted by Wilbur Young, state
superintendent of public instruc-
tion, included some from teach-
ers who said they could make more
money as insurance agents and
mail carriers.
One teacher told of being dis-
missed three days before the end
of the school year after teaching
for eight years in the community
and making plans to build a home
there.

Ip

I

i

The Student Relations Com-
mittee of the Development Coun-
cil met yesterday to discuss a pro-
posed charter of organization.
Eugene Hartwig, '58L, last year's
student representative on the
committee, outlined the charter
proposal for Development Coun-
cil officials and student members.
Main points of the charter were
a list of purposes of the commit-
tee and membership consisting of
two student members of the Board
of Directors of the Development
Council, representatives, from the
five student housing organiza-
tions, three representatives from
Senior Board and two or three
members-at-large.
Tapping Questions Scope
During the discussion of the
Student Relations Committee as
listed in the charter proposal, T.
Hawley Tapping, General Secre-
tary of the Alumni Association
questioned the scope and func-
tion of the committee.
As conceived last year the com-
mittee would function to raise the
student interest in their local
alumni clubs and Development
Council work after graduation,
and to carry out Development
Council programs on the student
level. Student Government Coun-
cil president Hank Berliner, '56,
informed the group of a new SGC
committee aimed at sending stud-
bnts to address alumni groups, and

Jane Howard, '56, mentioned the
Senior Board intended to work in
a similar area.
Problem Halts Discussion
Discussion then centered around
the problem of whether the Stud-
end Relations Committee should
coordinate such activities or
should limit itself to promoting
the Development,Council only.
Not able to reach a conclusion,
the group adjourned until Wed-
nesday. Chairman Donna Netzer,
'56, appointed a sub-committee to
incorporate new ideas brought out
in the discussion into another
charter for approval by the com-
mittee.
After receiving final approval
from the committee, the charter
will go to SGC for recognition and
t~len to the Board of Directors of
the Development Council.
Operetta Try-outs
To Begin Today
The Gilbert and Sullivan So-
ciety is holding tryouts for the
chorus and leads for their next
production "The Gondoliers."
The tryouts will be held from
7:30 through 10:30 p.m. today and
Saturday in the League. Sunday
the times will be 2:00 through 5:00
p.m. and 7:30 through 10:30 p.m-.
The room will be posted.

y)
,"1

.4

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

SlUDEN/T&t ll/OKYI*OODLE TIMFJ6AF4N!
Got a Lucky Droodle

000000
BOWLING BALL
FOR CENTIPEDE
Ann Bosler
Sarah Lawrence

in your noodle?

&enditkn and

S;

L

Hundreds and hundreds of students earned $25 in Lucky Strike's Droodle
drive last year-and they'll tell you it's the easiest money yet.
Droodles are a snap to do-just look at the samples here. Droodle
anything you want. Droodle as many as you want. If we select your
Droodle, we'll pay $25 for the right to use it, with your name, in our
advertising. And we always end up paying for plenty we don't use!
Send your Droodle, complete with title, to Lucky Droodle, P. O. Box
67A, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Include your name, address, college and class.
Please include, too, the name and address of the dealer in your college town
from whom you buy cigarettes most often.
While you droodle, light up a Lucky, the cigarette that tastes better
because it's made of fine tobacco . . . and "'It's Toasted" to taste better.
DROODLES, Copyright 1953 by Roger Price

.4

BLANK VERSE
John Vancini
Boston College
rC

a K/
- ----------

"IT'S TOASTED"

to taste better!

.,

®A. T. Co. PRODUCT OF cA wa n X/tlff I AMERICA'S LEADING MANUFACTURER OF CIGARETTES j

Alb

i

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