100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 30, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ALLY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30,1955

MSU Game Recalls 1938 Contest kt E' t

"V._

FOREST EVASHEVSKI
. only the beginning

coach, young personnel-even new
helmets. But it went farther than
these tangibles. For it also mark-
ed a new era in Michigan football
-the magic era of Harmon, Eva-
shevski, Kromer, and later, West-
fall, Ceithaml and Wistert.
B e f o r e the eagerly-awaited
classic started, the gay M. S. C.
cheerleaders paraded confidently
around the gridiron's edge, bear-
ing a coffin mockingly labelled
"Michigan".
As for the game, few words
could be put into usage 'which
would properly convey the spirit
of furious propensities which the
M i c h i g a n squad demonstrated
that day.
It became clear that the Wolv-
erines' determination would not
and could not be overshadowed by
mny other force on the field. The
leader of this mighty onslaught
would be a 19-year-old speedster
from Lorain, Ohio, named Paul
Kromer, who went on eventually
to become one of the "greats" of
Michigan's football tradition.
Kromer Stars
This husky little halfback not
only scored both of Michigan's
touchdowns and contributed most
of the Wolverines' 188 - yard
ground attack, but also pounced
alertly on a blocked extra-point
attempt and scampered it over the
goal line while the Spartan sup-
porters looked on in outrage.
But Kromer wasn't the whole
show. The line blocked and tackled
with inspired authority. A wily
young German lad from Detroit
named Evashevski launched a
brilliant grid career, quarterback-
ing in rugged fashion. He allowed
she other backs to do the running
and passing while engaging in
his favorite pastime of plowing
into would-be tacklers.
It was a pretty happy afternoon
for Michigan, to say the least.
The proud throng of Michigan
rooters watched with elation as
their unbeatable machine of Blue
ripped off an unforgettable 14-0
win, for they knew that another
fabulous chapter in Michigan ath-
letics was just beginning.

BILL MaOPHEE, MICHIGAN RESERVE CENTER, IS ONLY
WOLVERINE GRIDDER OUT FOR AN INDEFINITE LENGTH
OF TIME.
Wolverines End Workouts
In Preparation For Spartans
,p

eously at Division and Maynard
on Liberty Street. Repeated bar-
rages of the tear gas, together
with warning cries of "Here comes
the cops!" continued the move-
ment of the mob back to State
and North U.
. At this point, police pointed the
gas directly at the students, who
fled, eyes streaming, to another
fire in front of the Union. Another
barrage of gas plus a fire hose
induced the crowd to flow down
State Street to Ferry Field, where
a roaring fire-to-end-all-fires ac-
companied a final session of sing-
ing and cheers.
And the display didn't end there.
On the following afternoon-Oct-
ober 1, 1938-82,500 spectators
choked the mighty bowl at the
maddened search of the hides of
the haughty "Aggies".
New Era Begins
As mentioned previously, it was
a rejuvenated band of Blue that
charged onto Michigan Stadium
that October afternoon -n e w

Varsity spirit continued to gain
momentum yesterday as Coach
Bennie Oosterbaan sent the team
through its final workout before
the Michigan State game tomor-
row.
Despite a light rain, the second
this week, Michigan gridders did
everything but an actual scrim-
mage. Emphasis was again placed
on familiarizing the defense with
the Spartans' offensive pattern,
while there also was a thorough
review of Michigan plays.
The line worked on blocking as-
signments, with signals being call-
There will be a meeting at
5:15 p.m. this afternoon at the
Intramural Building for all
men interested in officiating
I-M touch football games.
--Rod Grambeau
ed out by Assistant Line Coach
Bob Holloway from the quarter-
back position. The backs and ends
stressed pass plays into the flats
and over the center,
Pass Defense
Again the white-shirted reserves
gave the first team a workout on
pass defense.
The last contact drills worked
on punting assignments and the

4

kicking of extra points with Ron
Kramer as the key figure.
After a somewhat slow start this
week, the Wolverines now seem
ready to go. The seriously injured
list is encouragingly small. Only
reserve center Bill MacPhee, who
was hurt in last Saturday's game
after only a few minutes of action,
is expected to be out of operation
for an indefinite period of any
length. The word is out that Tom
Maentz might be back in action
after the Army or Northwestern
game.
Shatusky Impressive
One of the . most impressive
parts of recent practices has been
the strong left-footed punting of
reserve halfback Mike Shatusky,
a junior. The 25-year-old ex-
serviceman from Menominee,
Mich,. was booming solid punts
yesterday that would equal 50-55
yards from the line of scrimmage.
One of his boots thundered an
estimated 80 yards in the air.
Press men from various parts of
the country from leading maga-
zines and newspaper are beginning
to appear at the Wolverine drills.
Despite the added publicity,
Oosterbaan's forces continue to
work out with only one thought
in mind-this Saturday's game.

I

.,,

,+!

r

I

CHOMIAL Urilf.N

CONCERTS

1lI

ZINKA MILANOV,Soprano ................ Tuesday,October 11
Queen of the Metropolitan
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Charles Munch, Conductor ................ Monday, October 2
THE CLEVELAND. ORCHESTRA
George Szell, Conductor .............6..... Sunday, November

4
6

NATHAN MILSTEIN
World Renowned

Violinist .......... Monday, November 14

SHAW CHORALE AND ORCHESTRA
Robert Shaw, Conductor ................
t so n w5 s[ 1 rA W~fNMuAu//

Tuesday, November 22

VIENNA CHOIRS OY (2:30 P.M.Y.. . ... Sundqy, Ja
TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Sir Ernest MacMillan, Conductor ..... .- Wednesday, Fel
ARTUR RUBENSTEIN, Pianist .............. Thursday,
Eminent Artist

nuary
bruary

15
22

March 11

VIRTUOSI DI

ROMA .

Italy's Best
WALTER GIESEKING,
Outstanding Artist

.. ......... ............. Tuesday, M arch 13
Pianist ........... Monday, March 19

I

SEASON TICKETS: $17.00, $14.00, $12.00, $10.00
SINGLE: $3.50, $3.00, $2.50, $2.00, $1.50
EXTRA CONCERT SERIES

4

OBERNKIRCHEN CHILDREN'S CHOIR
Edith Moller, Conductor ................. Monday, October
PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA OF LONDON

17

Herbert von Karajan, Conductor ....... Wednesday, November 9
BOSTON POPS TOUR ORCHESTRA
Arthur Fiedler, Conductor .. *.......*..... Sunday, January 8
MYRA HESS Pianist................. Wednesday, February 15
Distinguished British Artist
TERESA STICH-RANDALL, Soprano .......... Friday, March 9
American Who Conquered Europe

"4

:t

SEASON TICKETS:
SINGLE TICKETS:

$8.50, $7.00, $6.00, $5.00
$3.50, $3.00, $2.50, $2.00, $1.50

I I i

All concerts will be held in Hill Auditorium, and will beain at 8:30 P.M.,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan