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February 12, 1956 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-12

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THE MCHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1956

TIlE mCHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 12. 1956
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RUSSIA WINTER CHAMPS:
U.S. Pucksters Surprise in Olympics

By DAVE GREY
Russia's winning of the 1956
Winter Olympics "unofficial team
title" by a wide margin last week
was certainly no surprise.
The United States' sixth place
finish in the competition at Cor-
tina D'Ampezzo, Italy, was also
pretty much as expected, but the
fine second-place showing of the
U.S. hockey team was one of the
Games' highlights for the Ameri-
can representatives.
Ikola "Best Goalie"
Big upset came when Johnny

Mayasich from Minnesota sparked
the 4-1 win over defending cham-
pions, Canada. Star goaltender in
the key victory was Michigan's
Willard "Ike" Ikola, who was lat-
er to be named "outstanding
goalie" from the six competing
countries.
Another ex - Wolverine, John
Matchefts, was the "big offensive
gun" in the 9-4 rout of Czecho-
slovakia.
American supremacy on skates
also was particularly encouraging
with the one-two-three sweep of

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VALENTINES

the Men's Figure Skating event,
won by Hayes Alan Jenkins from
Colorado College, Colo.
Albright Outstanding
The only other gold medal win-
ner for the United States was in-
jured but heavily-favored Tenley
Albright, who won the Women's
Figure Skating crown by a nar-
row margin over 16-yr.-old Carol
Heiss.
It was the showing of the
hockey squad, however, that was
the most unexpected. This was
the same team which Michigan
bowed to in Detroit, 4-1, on Janu-
ary 11.
Show-down game for the hockey
title came when Russia and the
United States met in the next-to-
the-last game in the round-robin
tournament. The Big Bear came
out on top, 4-0, but Ikola was
outstanding in a losing cause.
With only five minutes of play
remaining in the game, the
U.S.S.R. was able to expand a
narrow 1-0 lead into a 4-0 rout
of the tired American sextet.
Hockey Standings
Standings for the hockey com-
petition saw Russia (5-0), United
States (4-1), Canada (3-2), Swed-
en (1-3-1), Czechoslovakia (1-4),
and Germany (0-4-1).
Vnofficial point totals and
number of gold medals for the
leading countries follow: 1-Rus-
sia (121-6), 2-Australia (781/2-4),
3-Finland (66-3), 4 - Sweden
(62-2), 5-Switzerland (55%/2-3),
6-United States (54%'/2-2), 7-Nor-
way (47-2), 8-Italy (371-1), 9-
Germany (24-1), 10 - Canada
(16-0).
Denver Drops
Four Icers;
Coach Quits
Joe Kilbey, star University of
Denver forward and the team's
leading goal-getter this season,
was among four players dropped
from the squad recently by the
Pioneers' Coach Neil Celley for
breaking training rules.
Kilbey, in 14 games this season,
had fired ten goals and had a
hand in five others,for 15 points.
A senior, he had tallied a total
of 53 times du'ring his first two
years.
Celley said he was dropped for
"detrimental conduct on the ice."
Another to get the axe was
sophomore netminder Dave Broad-
belt. In ten games, he had lim-
ited the opposition to Just 2.5
goals per game.
Then, in an about face, Celley
himself handed in his resignation
last week. Denver is presently
lodged in fifth place in the West-
ern Intercollegiate Hockey League
with eight points.
Celley graduated from the Uni-
versity of Michigan in 1950 and
played hockey here under Coach
Vie ' Heyliger as an undergradu-,
ate.

RUSSIA'S IVAN TREGUBOV, left, and former Michigan Stater
Weldon Olson of the United States scramble for the puck during
the recent Olympic hockey match between their two nations.
Russia won the game, 4-0, on its way to copping the Olympic and
world's ice championship.
Seventh Grid Tilt Added
To '56 Home Schedule

Michigan football fans will have
an opportunity for the second con-
secutive year to see seven home
games, it was announced between
semesters.
Schedule plans originally called
for only six tilts at the Michigan
Stadium, but Northwestern's re-
quest to move its game, October
20, to Ann Arbor was granted by
the Wolverines.
This allows the Wildcats to
maintain their policy of playing
not more than five games at home
in one season. Earlier, the Illi-
nois-Northwestern game site had
been switched from Champaign to
Evanston,
With a seventh encounter at
home, the Wolverines will have

an excellent chance to break their
season's attendance mark which
was nearly erased last year.
Rose Bowl principals. UCLA and
Michigan State open Michigan's
1956 card on September 29 and
October 6, respectively, in Ann Ar-
bor. Three more home tilts fol-
low before the Wolverines make
their first road trip of the season.
Army appears, October 13, fol-
lowed by Northwestern, October
20, and Minnesota, October 27.
Traveling to Iowa City to play
the Hawkeyes, November 3, Michi-
gan returns home to meet Il-
linois and Indiana, November 10
and 17, respectively, before end-,
ing the season against Ohio State
at Columbus, November 24.

Ruling Deals.
Stiff Blow
To Michigan
Collegiate hockey-playing days
are over for Mike Buchanan and
Wally Maxwell.
Official word from the Big Ten
Conference on the suspension of
the two Michigan stars was an-
nounced last Tuesday.
"The eligibility committee of the
Western Conference in reviewing
the cases of Mike Buchanan and.
Wally Maxwell, University of Mi-
chigan hockey players, has con-
cluded that they were in viola-
tion of Conference regulations in
that they accepted expense money
for outside competition while still
in high school and, therefore, are
ineligible for further intercollegi-
ate competition."
Loss Will Be Felt
The Wolverines will feel the
loss of Buchanan and Maxwell in
the WIHL drive ahead. Coach Vic
Heyliger summed up the compli-
cate dsituation as "a sudden and
terrible blow."
Although the Big Ten will meet
next month in East Lansing on
March 2-3, no further $ action or
appeal is planned at present.
No formal action as to forfeit-
ing of games in which the two
stars played has been taken or
seems likely. The Wolverines are
still in the thick of the fight with
Colorado College and Michigan
Tech for one of the top two play-
offs spots in League play.
Faculty representative Marcus
Plant, who with Athletic Director
H. O. "Fritz" Crisler first reviewed
the cases, presented the Big Ten's
verdict to the University Commit-
tee on Eligibility this past Thurs-
day.
Buchanan, a defenseman, played
on last year's NCAA champion-
ship team; while sophomore Max-
well was one of the Wolverines'
leading scorers earlier this season.

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Landstrom, Wallingford Lead Wolverines
In Record-Shattering Michigan AAU Relays

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Some pace-setting performances
by both the hosts and their guests
highlightedthe annualiMichigan
AAU Relays at Yost Field House
on Friday, Feb. 3.
Top performers from inside the
state and out, high school, col-
lege and athletic club, helped pro-
vide the local gentry with one of
the most colorful events of the
Michigan winter sports season.
Three Michigan entries set AAU
and field house' records. Sopho-
more pole-vaulting phenom Eeles
Landstrom bested the old mark-
set last year by himself-of 14'
5", with a 14' 5%" vault.
Ron Wallingford, the Wolver-
ines' able captain, broke the 1000-
yard run precedent, although he
is known primarily for his two-
mile efforts. Capt. Wallingford
improved upon the old record of
2:14.5, set by teammate Peter

Gray in 1954, with a 2:14.2 clock-
ing.
M' Wins Sprint Medley
The exciting sprint -medley re-
lay event-consisting of a 440, a
pair of 220's and a half-mile --
found Michigan again bettering
a previous standard - this one
having been held by the Michigan
State quartet of Gosper, Buggs,
Brabham and Jarrett, which man-
aged to do 3:33.7 in 1954. The
Maize and Blue foursome of Grant
Scruggs, Dick Flodin, Bob Rude-
sill and Gray did it in 3:31.4.
However, perhaps the highlight
of the meet from a spectator
standpoint was the sensational
performance turned in by Doug
Stewart, a lithe Australian high-
jumper now enrolled at Michigan
State. His leap of 6' .8 5/16"
broke the old mark of 6' 6 ", be-
longing to Michigan's coach, Don
Canham. Canham's record jump
was executed in 1940. Fortunate-
ly for Big Ten high-Jumpers,
Stewart exhausted his collegiate
eligibility while competing in his
native country.
In the field events, besides
Landstrom's and Stewart's fine

showings, a personal record was
turned in by Michigan's Dave Ow-
en in the shot put. Owen, in nos-
ing out the ex-Olympic star, Bill
Bangert, heaved the 16-1b. ball
55' /)".
The two-mile relay also proved
successful for the home team. The
foursome of Laird Sloan, Robin
Varian, Wallingford and Gray
whipped past second-place Michi-
gan State in 7:56.5.
Tom Hendricks surprised for the
Wolverines in the 65-yard low
hurdles by finishing'a strong sec-
ond to Miami of Ohio's Tirril Bur-
ton.
Keilstrup Second in Mile
In the mile, Wheaton (Ill.) Col-
lege's Jim Hanchett won over Mi-
chigan's Geert Keilstrup in a close
one in 4:19.9. The Wolverines'
crack mile-relay team of Rudesill,
Varian, Flodin and Scruggs fin-
ished out the evening's events by
copping the university mile relay
in 3:20.2. A rousing ovation was
accorded Scruggs, last year's cap-
tain, whose fine anchor leg was
his last race as a Michigan ath-
lete. He graduated at the end
of the first semester.

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