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February 18, 1956 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1956

'U' Borrows
Atom Model
For Display
A model of a homogeneous nu-
clear reactor will be loaned to the
Department of Naval Architecture
and Marine Engineering February
28 to March 1, by the Newport
News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock
Company.
The Newport company, which
became active in shipbuilding in
1948, has constructed such ships
as the Forrestal, a 1036-foot air-
craft carrier, the Ranger, a similar
vessel, and the Atomic Mariner, a
nuclear powered cargo ship.
The homogeneous reactor pro-
ject is among five projects selected
by the Atomic Energy Cmmisson
aspart of its five year reactor
development program for civilian
power reactors.
- Design for Fabrication
Manufacture of the reactor
proper involved design for fabri-
cation, mock-up construction and
testing, and development of spe-
cial fabrication and welding tech-
niques both for stainless clad car-
bon steel.and zircaloy.
A homogeneous reactor system is
one in which both fuel and mod-
erfator are contained in a closed
system consisting basically of a
reactor, a pump, a pipe and a
heat-exchanger.--
The core tank is the heart of
the system where fissioning occurs
and heat is produced . This heat
is carried to the heat-exchanger
by the fuel-moderator solution
_._,where steam Is generated for the
turbine which drives the genera-
tor.
Nuclear Power Advantages
.Nuclear power for ship propul-
sion has two inherent advantages
over conventional systems because
a tremendous amount of energy
can be released from a minute
quantity of the nuclear fuel and
its fission requires neither air sup-
ply nor exhaust.
These advantages are of great
value to naval vessels since it
permits greatly extended range at
full speed and permits unhampered
operation of the power plant under
"water.
Te HNR model will be on dis-
play in Room 332 West Engineer-
ing. A representative of the build-
ers will be on hand to answer
questions.
Young Dems
te Staebler,
SWilams to U'
George Zuckerman, '58, acting
president of the Young Democrats,
announced the *organization plans
"to bring leading liberal spokes-
men to the campus during the
next semester."
Plans include Governor G.
Mennen Williams and Neil Staeb-
ler, State Democratic Chairman.
The Y.D. vice-president also said
the club is "hoping to sponsor
a mock political convention."
Through the convention, the club
can determine local student choice
for the Democratic nomination.
"The club is not committed to
any one- candidate," Zuckerman
explained, "although we have sup-
porters of Stevenson, Kefauver,
Williams and Harriman.
"The Young Democrats are now
faced with the responsibility of
being the sole liberal voice on this
campus," he continued. "Accord-
Ing to my own view-point, I would
say that students should not be
frightened by the current Demo-
cratic trends of moderation and
gradualness, as advocated by a

certain Democratic candidate.
"We hope members of our club
can contribute to furthering prog-
ressive policies for the future, in
line with basic New Deal-Fair Deal
philosophies-which have been
sadly lacking on the national
scene.
"The Young Democrats hope to
end the lethargy that has plagued
liberal activities for the last few
months," he stated.
Clinciy to Appear
Dr. Everett R. Clinchy, president
of the National Conference of
Christians and Jews, is scheduled
to appear on campus March 4-10
as the second speaker in the Reli-
gion Today series sponsored by the
University.
The main purpose of Dr. Clin-
chy's visit is informal contact and
discussion with students. He is
scheduled to deliver two lectures
on the subject "The Family of
Man."
Dr. Clinchy is president of
World Brotherhood, an organiza-
tion founded in 1950. Prominent
men representing several nations
participated in founding World
Brotherhood. Americans included
Henry R. Luce, Paul G. Hoffman
and Spyros P. Skouras, Frz-'ce
was represented by Paul Reynaud,
and Paul Henri Spaak, Belgium.

WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE-Providing aid to needy students all over the world, the WUS
is conducting a campus fund drive February 23-24. Nigerian students pictured here are shown using
a microscope which was provided by donations to- WUS. This organization aids exiled students,
builds dorms, equips classrooms and labs, constructs TB sanatariums and grants scholarhips and
loans. This financial aid is highly necessary because of the poverty of students abroad. For ex-
ample, forty percent of Pakistan's studehts will not finish college because they lack finaicial help.
Two of three student refugees interviewed in Germany live on less than $1 a day. Students are still
needed to man buckets during the drive scheduled next week. Anyone interested in participating may
obtain further information by calling Lane Hall today.
Medical School at MSU Proposed

Foreign
Fellowships
Available
If you are an American citi-i
zen with a bachelors degree and
are in good health you may be
eligible for several foreign gradu-
ate study scholarships announced
recently by the United States Stu-
dent Department of the Institute
of International Education in New
York.
Four scholarships are offered to
American students by the Austrian
government during 1956-57.
The awards may be used for
study at an Austrian university or
institution of higher learning in
history, social sciences, language,
and other liberal arts subjects;
Three fellowships named 'lien-
drik Willem van Loon," "Edward
W. Bok," and "Hendrik 'Aiton
Goenen," are offered by the Neth-
erlands government.
The fields of study open to stu-
dents include archaelogy, econom-
ics, technical and natural sciences,
agriculture and international law.
Successful candidates may study
at such institutions as the Uni-
versities of Amsterdam, teyden,
Gronigen and Utrecht.
Several opportunities for study
in Switzerland have been made
available by the American-Swiss
Foundation for Scientific Ex-
change.
The Universities of Basel, Bern,
Geneva, and Zurich offer tuition
grants which will be supplemented
by grants given by Swiss educa-
tional societies in appreciation of
American aid to Swiss students in
this country.
Fields of study open include ar-
chitecture, chemistry, engineering,
geology, physics, banking and in-
surance, as well as language and
literature.
The scholarships in any of the
three countries cover room and
board, expenses for the academic
year and tuition but require travel
expenses to be paid by the re-
cipient.
ThenFellowships, which are open
to both men and women, require a
B. A. degree with demonstrated
academic ability and capacity for
independent study. Only Austria
requires a knowledge of the
language.
Peale to lecture
Norman Vincent Peale, author
of "The Power of Positive Think-
ing" will appear at 8:30 p.m.
Monday in Hill Auditorium as the
sixth attraction in the University
Lecture Course.
DID YOU SEE THE
READER'S
(DIGEST
ARTICLE ON
DEC.1955 P. 157.159
Hamilton Business College
Phone NO 8-7831
State & William Sts.

By TED FRIEDMAN
At Western Michigan College in
Kalamazoo, a dormitory's plan to
boost dating has met with stagger-
ing success.
Hearing that large numbers of
girls rem-ained dateless on week-
ends, Walwood. Hall Dormitory
sponsored an advertisement in the
school paper to arrange dates for
girls who called in.
The men expected some reac-
tion, bit nothing like the deluge of
calls that followed.
In a short time, almost 150 coeds
had telephoned and 95 dates were
arranged.
Then, run out of men, Walwood
Hall put out an S.O.S. to other
men's dorms for help and finally
had to resort to sending in boys
from off-campus.
Nine thousand American stu-
dents studied abroad during 1954-
1955, the Institute of International
Education in New York reports.
Mexico led the roster having
1,395 United States students, with

Canada, Italy and the United
Kingdom following with 1,374,
1,084 and 1,009 respectively.
The survey, limited to students
having both United States citizen-
ship and permanent residence, re-
vealed they studied in a total of
47 nations and political areas.
Almost 59 per cent was enrolled in
European schools.
* * *
Engineering students have come
out with their own definition of
the female of the species.
At Southern Technical Institute
in Chamblee, Georgia, the "Tech-
nician" printed the following defi-
nition of the 'woman:
SYMBOL: WO
ACCEPTED ATOMIC WEIGHT:
120 lbs.
PHYSICAL PROPERTIES: Boils
at nothing and freezes at any
minute; melts when properly
treated; very bitter if not well
used.
OCCURRENCE: Found wher-
ever man exists.
CIEMICAL PROPERTIES: Pos-

sesses great affinity for gold, sil-
ver, platinum and precious stones.
Violent reaction if left alone. Able
to absorb great amounts of food
matter.
USES: Highly ornamental; use-
ful as a tonic in acceleration of
low spirits and as equalizer of the
distribution of wealth. It is prob-
ably the most effective income-
reducer agent known.
CAUTION: Highly explosive in
inexperienced hands.
The Associated Collegiate Press
reports the editor of Los Angeles'
Daily Trojan received a traffic
ticket for negligent driving at the
height of. the paper's safe driving
campaign.
* * *
At Kent State, the student paper
conducted a poll to find the most
popular feature.
Outranking news, football, mov-
ies and local columns, to the edi-
tors' dismay, they found Max
Shulman's advertisements in first
place.

p,

i

Come

to Church

College Roundup

rI

Sunday,

-6

EAST LANSING ()-"Extreme
interest" in a proposal that Michi-
gan State University develop a1
school of medicine was expressed
yesterday by the State Board of
Agriculture, MSU governing body.
Violent opposition to the pro-
posal was expected to come from
the University of Michigan The
University has prided itself on its
leadership in the field in the state
and nation and has been tradition-
ally opposed to MSU expanding
into its special fields such as law
and medicine.
MSU president John A. Hannah
rade the announcement " the
MSU interest in a medical school
following a meeting between the
State Board and a delegation of
six Lansing area physicians headed
by Dr. Frederick Schwartz of Lans-
ing.
"The group urged," Hannah re-
ported, "that if there is to be an
additional medical school operated
as part of one of the public-sup-
ported facilities, then the logical
affiliation for this facility is with
Michigan State University."
"They based their case on the
fact that some of the required
staff, facilities and experience are
already available and intergration
with the strong existing programs
in the allied sciences would provide
a base of support for the medical
faculty and program not available
elsewhere.
"As they pointed out," Hannah
said, "Michigan State University
for many years has been concern-
ed with many types of research
and clinical experience basic to
the medical sciences.
"Strong fundamental science
courses and excelle faculties and
facilities in physiology, pharma-
cology, microbiology, medical tech-
organization
Notices
East Quad Radio Club: WCBN-EQ-
There will be an organizational meeting
for all members of the East Quad radio
station today at 10:30 a.m. in the
Benzinger Library downstairs in East
Quad. This is an important meeting
and everyone must attend if possible.
Anyone who has not auditioned but has
some interest in radio should attend to
get an idea of the station's operation.
To be a staff member you need not lie
in East Quadrangle.
Millel Foundation: Saturday morning
Sabbathservices, 9:00 a.m., Hillel.
Student Zionist Organization: Execu-
tive meeting, 4:30 p.m., Feb. 19, Hillel.
Everyone welcome.
Student Zionist Organization: Ber-
nard Lazarwitz will speak on "The
Effects of Present Population Shifts
on Egypt and Israel," Feb. 19, 7:00
p.m., Hillel.
Student Zionist Organization .wll
sponsor Israeli folk dancing, Feb. 19,
7:00 p.m., Hillel.
Sunday night Supper Club followed
by record dance, 6:00 p.m., Hillel.
* * *
SRA: Folk Dancing in the Lane Hall
recreation room, Feb. 20, 7:30-10:30 p.m.
Instruction for every dance, and be-
ginners are welcomre.
* * *
Undergraduate Mathematics club:
Professor McLaughlin will speak on
"Constructions with Ruler and Com-
pass," Feb. 20, 7:15 p.m., Rm. 3K, Union.
« .
Wesleyan Guild: "Leap Year Party,"
tonight, 8:00 p.m., Wesley Lounge.

nology, human nutrition and nurs-
ing training are parts of our pres-
ent programs.
"The response of the board was
an official expression of great
interest, the more acute because
rural areas, for which MSU bears
a special responsibility, suffer es-
pecially from a lack of adequate
medical service."
Hannah said the Board would
not consider establishing a medical
school without consent of the
legislature, which would have to
provide the necessary funds.
He said that the Board "noted
with interest" the action of the
Russian Specialist
William Edgerton, a specialist
in Russian studies, willspeak on
"Two Months in Russia" at 8 p.m.
tonight in Aud. B, Angell Hall.
Edgerton who has done exten-
sive work abroad as part of the
Quaker relief program spent two
months traveling and doing re-
search in Russia in summer' of
1955.
His experience among Slavic
peoples begain in 1944 when he
worked in a camp for Yugoslav
refuges in Egypt. Edgerton also
served as interpreter and director
of a Yugoslav repatriation team.
Edgerton served as visiting pro-
fessor in the Department of Slavic
Languages and Literatures at the
University in 1954-1955. He holds
a doctoral degree from Columbia
University in Russian Literature
and is a member of the Pennsyl-
vania State College faculty.

University of Michigan in appoint-
ing a committee to make a study of
the need for additional medical
facilities.
"In this connection," Hannah
said, "the nquestion was raised
whether the public interest would
not be better served if the study
werebconducted under the auspices
of the state government with ade-
quate representation from the leg
islature and the public generally as
well as from the two existing medi-
cal schools and medical and health
agencies."
In connection with the same
problem, the State Board also went
on record as opposed to a proposal
to put Wayne University-includ-
ing its medical school-under the
State Board of Regents, governing
body of the University _of Michi-
gan.
"The Board noted that this was
a matter outside its jurisdiction.
Then it went on record as favoring
the original plan, suggested by a
study committee headed by Dr.
Alexander B. Ruthven, former Uni-
versity of Michigan president,
calling for Wayne to be taken over
by the state but to come under the
direction of a separate board, not
connected with any other state-
supported university.
Hannah said that MSU had tra-
ditionally believed that it should
not enter the field of medicine as
long as the best interests of the
people of Michigan would be served,
by the' developments of medical
schools at the University of Mich-
igan and Wayne University until
they reached their optimum ca.
pacities.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets.
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: "Worship and
Prayer Life."
9:45 A.M. Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
5:30 P.M., upper at the Congregational Church.
Miss' Barbara Dunn, USF representative,
speaker.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M. Friends Meeting.
10:45 A.M. Sunday School.
6:30 P.M. Young friends fellowship supper
meeting.
Mr. Ralph Cooper will discuss Summer Service
Project of the American Friend's Service
Comm.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, Eugene
A. Ransom, Ministers.
9:OQ and 10:45 A.M.-Worshib, "Religion With-
out Shortcuts." Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M.-2 discussion groups
1. "Problems of Christian Belief." 1
2. "Paul's Faith and the World's Religions."
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M..-Wesleyan Guild meeting.
7:15 P.M.-Leave for the Congregational Church,
Universal Day of Prayer for students.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
Services:
8 o'clock Holy Communion at St. Andrew's
Church. (Breakfast at the Canterbury House
following the 9 o'clock).
11 o'clock-Morning prayer and sermon.
7 P. M. Group discussion on Sacramental Living
at Canterbury House.
8 P.M. Evening prayer and commentary.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue,
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sunday 11 A.M.
Feb. 19-Mind
Wednesday 8 P.M.
Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Reading Room, 339 South Main. Tuesday to Sat-
urday 11 A.M. to 5 P.M., Monday 11 A.M. to
9 P.M., Sunday 2:30 to 4:30.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister.
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group. Professor John F,
Shepard on: "Psychology and Religion."
11 A.M. Sermon: "Galilee" by Rev. Edward H.
Redman.
7:00 P.M. Unitarian Student Group gather at
Lane Hall to go to Skating Party.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL

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William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00,
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.,
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Con-
ter.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "The Old Testa-
ment According to Christ."
Sunday at 6:00 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper and Program. Talk by
the Rev. Vernold Auich Asst, Pastor of St.
Paul's Lutheran Church, on "C. F. W. Wal-
ther, Christian Leader and Theologian."
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.: Lenten Vesper Service.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
'CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Andrew Missiras
9:30 Matins
10:00 Sunday School.
10:30 Divine Liturgy
Sermon in Greek and English.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Morse Saito, Student Director.
10:45 Worship Service. S.ermon: "We Believe In
the Redemptive Power of the Gospel" by Rev.
Press.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Chester H. Loucks and Duane L. Day, Min-
isters. Student Advisor: Beth Mahone.
Sunday, February 19
9:45-The Student Class will continue its study
of the "Parables of Jesus."
11:00-Sermon: "Jesus, Son of Man." Rev. Day.
5:30-Guild Supper.
7:30-Guild will attend the World Student Day
of Prayer Service at the Congregational
Church.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10 o'clock-Sunday, School.
11:00-"A Willing Heart"
6:00-Student Guild.
7:00-"Prayer Changes Things."
Wednesday 7:30-Prayer Meeting. We extend
a cordial welcome to each of you.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and Williams Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A.,Parr
Church School and Junior Church at 10:45 A.M.
Public Worship 10:45 A.M. Dr. Parr will preach
first in a series of Lenten sermons on "Faiths
on "What the Wind Said to the Moon." The
Men Live By." Student Guild supper at 5:30.
The Student Day of Prayer Service will be
held in the sanctuary at 7:30.

A.

1

"

We'll be in
to see you soon .. .

r placement interviews in the following areas:

AIRCRAFT ENGINE CONTROLS
GUIDED MISSILES-COMPLETE DEVELOPMENT

"

AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR
AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS

.1

MECHANICAL
ELECTRONIC
AERONAUTICAL

@5!

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Wm. 5. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday: Communion at 8:15, 9:15, and 11:00'
A.M.

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