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May 26, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T H MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAIIX SATURDAY,

EGENTS MEETING RESULTS:
New Appointments to University Staff Revealed

Dell Books, Partisan Review
Editors Describe Procedures

(Continued from Page 1)

Appointed were Rudolph Schust-
er, assistant professor of botany,
and curator of bryophytes in the
University Herbarium for 1956-57;
John J. Carroll, visiting assistant
professor of economics for 1956-
57; Oevar Wesler, assistant profes-1
sor of mathematics for a three-
year terma; Irving Singer, assistant
Professor of philosophy for 1956-
57. Dr. Singer was awarded a post-
d o c t o r i a 1 Filbright Research
Scholarship in 1955, and has spent3
the past year in research at the:
University of Paris.E
Also accepted were Noah E.
Sherman, assistant professor of
physics for 1956-57; George H.
Trilling, assistant professor of
physics for a three-year term;
Joseph B. Adelson, visiting assis-
tant professor of psychology for
1956-57 and Justin L. Weiss, as-
sistant professor of psychology'
1956-57.
All eight of the literary college
appointments hold doctorates.
Education School
In the School of Education, two
two appointments were approved.
Howard S. Bretsch was appoint-
ed professor of educational ad-
ministration. Bretsch has been on
the University of California faculty
since 1951, when he came from
service at the University of New
Hampshire.
Finley Carpenter was appointed
assistant professor of education
for 1956-57. Carpenter holds three
degrees from Indiana University.
He served as head of the psychol-
ogy department at Northwest Mis-
houri State College for the year
1952-53, and has been a member
of the Board of Examiners and an
instructor at Michigan State Uni-
versity since 1953.
The appointment of Arthur F.
Southwick, Jr., as assistant pro-7
fessor of business law in the'
School of Business Administration
was also approved. Southwick has
been with the National City Bank
of Cleveland where he has dealt
with the administration of estates,
testamentary trusts and guardian-
ship since 1951.
Language Institute
Prof. Robe-t Lado of -the Eng-
lish department, has been an-
nounced new director of the Eng-
lish Language Institute.
The present director, Charles
Fries, will begin a retirement fur-
lough in February of 1957, but has
asked to be relieved of the direct-
orship after June 30, 1956.
Prof. Lado has been on the'
English Language Institute staff
since 1945, and has beeL associ-
ate director since 1952.
The institute was founded by
Prof. Fries in 1941 for the purpose
of providing special instruction in
the teaching of English to foreign
Works Shown
At Rackhiam
The third annual art show spon-
sored by the Inter-Arts Union may
be seen in the East Gallery of the
Rackham Bupilding today.
A jury comosed of Prof. Marvin
Eisenberg of the fine arts depart-
ment, and Frede Vidar and Emil
Weddige of the Architecture school
awarded prizes: first prize. "As I
See It," watercolor, Dale Eldred,
second prize, untitled, oil, F.I. Wil-
kins, third prize, "Harlequin,"
Robert Maitland, honorable men-
tion, "Woo in a Beanie," terra-
cotta head, Helen Napier; and
paintings by Jane Brill Cohler and
Anna Muschenheim.

students, making use of the ad-
vances in linguistic science. More
than 5,000 students have received
the advantages of the eight week's
course.
Dr. Robert A. Moore, junior
clinical instructor in psychiatry,
has been named associate psychia-
trist on the staff of University
Health Service.
Tupper Director
Dr. John C. Tupper was appoint-
ed director of the new pre-employ-
ment and employees health ex-
aminatoin program. Dr. Tupper
served as intern, assistant resi-
dent, resident and junior clinical
instructor at the University from
1948 to 1952. He has been an in-
structor in internal medicine at
the University since 1954, the date
of his return from the United
States Air Force.
The Regents also adopted a
Auto Accident
Research Set
Automobile accident research is
the subject of a proposed experi-
mental program presently being
planned by the Medical School
Accident Trauma Injury Commit-
tee.
Studies would fall into three
categories: medical problems of
accident prevention involving the
physically and mentally handicap-
ped, surgical problems, such as
injury combinations during an ac-
cident and rehabilitation, and
basic science problems involving
deceleration effects on the body,
in addition to vision and hearing
problems.
Individuals with various physi-
cal and medical handicaps would
be exposed to highway conditions
simulated on a three dimensional
curved screen for reaction tests.
The information obtained would
indicate the relative importance
of a handicap as an effect on safe
driving and the amount and type
of compensation made by the
driver behind the wheel.
Recommendations
-The results of these experiments
would suggest recommendations to
drivers operating under the var-
ious handicaps.-
Another phase of the experi-
ments, from the standpoint of
basic science, would be more vari-
able in approach.
According to Dr. Wilfred Demp-
ster, member of the committee,
the program, which should be
formulated by the end of this
month, will be "experimental
rather than statistical."
Dr. Dempster said that although
the research would be conducted
by the medical school, it could be
dovetailed with work done by other
departments.
A major problem might be fin-
ancing. Funds could be received
from the state legislature and the
Public Health Department of the
federal government with some aid
from automotive companies.

memoir expressing their sorrow
over the death on April 23, 1956
of Dr. William M. Brace, assistant
professor of hygiene and public
health and physician in the Health
Service.
Leaves of Absence
The following leaves of absence
were granted: Prof. Harold M.
Levinson of the economics depart-
ment who has received a Ford
Foundation Research Fellowship
for the second semester of 1956-
57, to work on a companion vol-
ume to his "Word Geography of
the Eastern States"; Prof. George
Kish, of the geography depart-
ment, to accept appointment as
visiting professor of geography at
the University of, Hawaii: Prof.
Irwin .Stumm, curator in the
Museum of Paleontology to study
the "Falls of the Ohio"; Prof. Mar-
ston Bates, who has been invited
by Chancellor Jaime Benitez of
the University of Puerto Rico and
to advise him on general' policy
problems of that University; Prof.
Robert Bolt to act as visiting pro-
fessor of the Universidad de Antio-
quia, Medellin, Columbia, under
the Rockerfeller Foundation spon-
sored exchange program; Prof.
Ivan F. Duff to visit the Karolin-
ska Institute in Stockholm, Swed-
en and the Rheumatic Research
Center, University of Manchester,
England.
Sick Leaves
Sick leave was granted to: Prof.
Howard Ehrmann, chairman of the
department of history, Prof. Paul
Wright, of the zoology department,
Charles Irwin of the School of
Business Administration and Viv-
ian Boersam, teacher in the Uni-
versity School.
The following report on plant
extension progress was presented
to the Regents:
Demolition of structures on the
site of the Medical Science and
School of Nursing Building was
completed by May 15 and the con-
tractor has begun excavation.
The contractoris excavating for
footings of the University Hos-
pital-Food Service eddition, and
has started the underpinning for
the present building.
Nuclear Reactor
The exterior enclosure of the
Ford Nuclear Reactor and build-
ing is complete and the reactor
pool is 100 per cent poured.
Work is progressing satisfactori-
ly on Northwood Apartments,
Group II.
Half of the roof slab of the Stu-
dent Activities Building is com-
plete. Exterior brickwork is pro-
gressing satisfactorily as the con-
crete frame is completed.
Honorary Election
New officers have been elected
for Pi Tau Sigma, Lawrence Har-
dy, '57E, has announced.
President of the national me-
chanical engineering honorary is
Hardy, vice-president is D o n a 1 d
Wille, '57E, and treasurer is James
Fenton, '57E.

Plans for the first unit of the
Fluids Engineering Building will
be ready about the first of June,
with construction bids scheduled
for early July.
Plans and specifications for the
Henry S. Frieze Building, the old
Ann Arbor High School, are being
checked preliminary to submission
for constructoin bids.
Undergrad Library
Excavation for the Undergrad-
uate Library is complete and 50
per cent of the column and wall
footing are complete: basement ex-
terior walls are being formed and
poured.
Material and equipment for the
General Library Rehabilitation, are
being procured and it is expected
that actual work will start about
the middle of June.
The architect is expected to have
the site layout for Group III of
the Northwood Apartments ready
in June 1956.
Awarding of the low bid for the
construction of a parking structure
to Jeffress-Dyer, Inc., was also
confirmed.
The Regents approved a con-
struction budget of $630,000 for the
project, which is to be financed
from fees collected for staff park-
ing permits and revenues from the
parking meters.

Knox Burger, one of the editors
of Dell Books, told the Michigan
Writers' Conference today that a
book manuscript should have not
only artistic excellent, but pop\l-

lar appeal if it is going to be ac-
cepted.
He added that there are many
factors that determine whether or
not a manuscript will be reject-
ed. Even the letter which ac-
companies a submitted work could
affect the editor's decision.
If the letter does not sound
sincere, editors may suppose the
author is insincere in his literary
work.
Philip Rahv, editor of Partisan
Review Magazine, gave an extend-
ed description of what happens to
a manuscript when it is received
in the offices of his magazine.
The conference was sponsored
by the English department and the
extension service as a part of
Michigan Week. It was also tim-
ed to coinside with the announce-
ment of Hopwood Awards.
More than 200 writers attended
the two day session.
MSU Gets Grant
EAST LANSING (A)The Kresge
Foundation of Detroit has given
$1,500,000 to Michigan State Uni-
versity for construction of a new
building to house the art depart-
ment.
The gift was accepted today by
the 'state board of agriculture,
MSU governing body.

'U' Students
Win Medals
For ROTC
Medals for outstanding military
activity and achievement were
awarded members of the Univer-
sity's ROTC unit last week at at
review of the corps held on the
soccor field near Michigan Sta-
dium.
Chicago Tribune gold medals
for outstanding achievement in
military subjects went to Cadet
Colonel George W. Hill, Jr., '57,
MS IV, and Cadet Master Sergant
George S. Eliason, '57, MS III. Sil-
ver medals were won by Cadet
Corporal Robert B. Johnson, '59,
E, MS II, and Cadet Private Heil-
bron B. Love, Jr., '59E, MS I.
Armed Forces Communications
and Electronics Association medal
for the outstanding senior ROTC
student majoring in electrical en-
gineering was won by Cadet Major
James D. Knipp, '56E.

Organization
Notices

. U
Gothic ,Film Society: The film "Maed-
chen in Uniform" will be shown, May
28, 8:00 p.m.. Rackham Amphitheatre.
There will also be an election of offi-
cers.
Graduate Outing Club: Any Grad in-
terested in swimming, hiking, and
cooking-out, meet behind Rackham
Bldg., May 27, 2:00 p.m. Other plans
will be made if it rains.
Hillel Foundation: Saturday morning
Sabbath service, 9:00 a.m., Hillel.
Michigan Christian Fellowship: David
Adeney, Intervarsity Staff, will speak
on "when Christ Comes Again," today,
4:00 p.m., Lane Hall.
* * *
Orthodox Student Society: Picnic at
west Park, May 27, 2:00-6:00 p.m.;
tickets will be available at the park.
Student Religious Association: Folk
Dancing sessions at Lane Hall will be
held May 28, June 4, and June 11, 1958,
7:30-10:00 p.m. in the recreation room.
The group will' not meet during the
summer but will resume activities next
fall.

PHILIP RAHV
... Partisan Review

1 I

Come

to Church

Second Semester
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
June 1 to June 12, 1956
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June
11 or 12 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to the scheduling committee:
Evening Schedule for Degree Candidates

Sunday

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily- at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays--10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns,
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill R. Abbey; Erland J. Wangdahl,
William B. Hutchinson, Eugene A. Ransom
Ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 a.m. Worship, "The God we Vain-
ly Seek, Finds Us," Dr. Abbey Preaching.
9:30 a.m. Two discussion groups, Problems of
Christian Belief; Paul's Faith and World Re-
ligions.
2:00, 4:00 and 5:00 p.m. Cars leaving for picnic
supper and evening of fellowship at Campbell's
cottage. Final meeting of this semester.
7:30 p.m. Fireside Forum.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, Open
Doily.
ANN ARBOR MENNONITE
FELLOWSHIP
Lane Hall Upper Room
7 P.M. Sunday
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Morse Saito, Student Director
10:45 A.M. Communion Service.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.

FOR SALE
SATURDAY

MICHIGAN UNION LOBBY FURNITURE
Inquire at Manager's Office

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8 o'clock Holy Communion at St. Andrews Church
(Breakfast at Canterbury House following the
9 o'clock.)
11 o'clock Morning prayer and sermon.'
5:45 Buffet Supper.
7 o'clock open house.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with Trinity Sunday sermon by the pastor, "A
Formula For Bestowing Blessing". (Holy Com-
munion in the 10:45 service).
Sunday at 3:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, leaves Center for outing at Dexter-Huron
Park. Another group will leave at 5 for the
picnic supper only.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Rformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service.
7.00 Evening Service.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M. Friends Meeting.
10:45 A.M. Sunday School.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & South Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9 and 11:00 a.m. Worship Services
10:00 n.m. Bible Study
5:30 p.m. Meet for a Picnic.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor,
10:00 Sunday School.
11:00 "THE TESTIMONY OF A CHURCH."
6:00 Student Guild.
7:00 "STRENGTH IN WEAKNESS."
Wednesday 7:30 Prayer Meeting.
We welcome you.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Church School and Junior Church at 10:45 a.m.
Public Worship at 10:45 am. Dr. Parr will preach
on "WHAT IS REAL RELGIN?"
Student Guild willhave picnic supper and outdoor
vespers.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sunday, 11 A.M.
Wednesday, 8 P.M., Testimony Meeti-y.
Sunday School, 9:30 A.M.
Reading Room, 339 South Main.
Tuesday to Saturday, 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Monday,
11 A.M. to 9 P.M.; Sunday, 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.

Regular 'Mon.
Exam June 11
Time 9-12 A.M.
Mon.
Peial June 4
7-10 P.M.
Each student should

Mon. Tues.
June 11 June 12
2-5 P.M. 9-12 A.M.,
Tues. Wed.
June 5 June 6
7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M.
receive notification from

tor as to the time and" place of his examination.

MON

Time of Class
(atf
(at
(at7
'DAY (at
(atJ
(at]
(at
(at

REGULAR SCHEDULE
Time of Examination
8 Friday, June 1
9 Monday, June 4
10 Tuesday, June 5
11 Saturday, June 2
12 Friday, June 8
1 Friday, June 8
2 Wednesday, June 3
3 Friday, June 8

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12

rt ''

4

TUESDAY

(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3

Saturday, June 2
Tuesday, June 5
Friday, June 1
Monday, June 4
Thursday, June 7
Thursday, June 7
Wednesday, June 6

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

Botany 2, 122
Bus. Ad. 11
Bus. Ad. 12
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 8, 20, 182, 183
Economics 71'
Economics 72
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 102 153
English 1, 2 Group A
English 1, 2 Group B*
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32, 61, 62
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32
Naval Science 102, 202, 302, 402
Political Science 2
Psychology 31
Psychology 271
Russian 2
Sociology 1 Group A, 60
Sociology 1 Group B
Spanish 1, 2, 22, 31, 32

Tues.
June 12
2-5 P.M
Thurs.
June 7
7-10 P.M.
his instrue-

Thursday, June 7 9-12
Friday, June 8 2-5
Wednesday, June 6 2-5
Wednesday, June 6 9-12
Friday, * June 8 2-5
Wednesday, June 6 2-5
Thursday, June T 2-5
Wednesday, June 6 2-5
Friday, June 8 2-5
Tuesday, June 12 9-12
Tuesday, June 12 2-5
Saturday, June 9 2-5
Monday, June 11 9-12
Saturday, June 9 9-12
Wednesday, June 6 9-12
Monday, June 11 2-5
Saturday, June 9 9-12
Monday, June 11 9-12
Monday, June 11 2-5

-4

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""" Get the Most from Your
Sume Vacation
SummRer Vacation.

*This Group B exam. Is open only to students having a

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Chester H. Loucks and Duane
isters. Student Advisor: Beth

+et4 ""'r ! "
SsIbe
Subscribe, ote Summer

L. Day, Mih-
Mahone.

9:45 The student class will continue its studies
on the life and character of Jesus. This week
emphasizes the Book of John.
11:00 Sermon: "THE MIGHTY WORKS OF GOD."
Reverend Day.
5:00 The Roger Williams Fellowship will meet
at the Student House to go together for their
Senior picnic.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister.
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group.
Mr. Robert Dabbage on: "Opportunities for
Negroes in the Ann Arbor Community."
11 A.M. Services. Rev. Edward H. Redman preach-
ing on: "Human Values and the National
Life."
3 P.M. Unitarian Student Group picnic. Meet at
rear of Michigan League.
Monday at 8 P.M. Unitarian Men'ssClub at home
of Dean C. Baker, 1720 Longshore Drive, to
view movie: "Almanac of Liberty" from an
outstanding TV show.

Ch.-.
C.E.
C.E.
C.E.
Dra
Dra
Dra
E.E.
E.M
F.M
Eng
M. -I
Naw
Phy.
P.E.

*conflict with the period assigned to Group A.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
-Met. 1 Monday, June 11
2 Saturday, June 9
70 Monday, June 11
181 Monday, June 11
w. 1, 3 Tuesday, June 12
w. 2 Monday, June 11,
w, 2x Saturday, June 9
5 Saturday, June 9
.1 Tuesday, June 12
. 2 Monday, June 11
lish 10, 11 Monday, June 11
I. 135 Wednesday, June E
1. 136 Tuesdays June 12
al Science 102, 202, 302, 402 Saturday, June 9
,sics 53 Friday, June 1.
31, 32, 131 Saturday, June 9

2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
215
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
6 9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12

t

A

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCI9NCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 W.E. between
April 20 and May 4 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Tndividual examinations will be glven for all applied music

Lirhtian tailu

X

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

I I

11

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