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May 22, 1956 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, MAY 22, 1956'

t"Arv BRICIM

PAGE FIVE

,U! AMY2,15 U MCIA AL AEFV

EX-PANHELLENIC PRESIDENT:
Debbie Hesitates To Call Them Duties
By JERRY DeMAAGD I
Deborah Townsend, '56, ex-
Panhellenic Association President,
has been aptly described by sev-
eral students as the most intensive
person they have ever met.

The truth of this statement be-.
comes apparent in an interview
with Miss Townsend. She devotes
characteristic and full attention
to everything she does;
"I don't make a practice of
psychoanalyzing my friends, but
if they come to me with their
dreams I do the best I can," Deb-
bie, a psychology major, said.
Although she will have a sec-
ondary teacher's certificate in
English and Social Studies. Miss
Townsend is not planning to teach
next year, but is considering at-
tendance at Boston University for
a Masters Degree in Social Work.
. Lived In Ann Arbor
"I've 4iwd in Ann Ar-ior all my
life and that's why I am almost
determined to do it" shA said.
Growing up in Ann Arbo has pro-
vided her with many valuable
opportunities she noted. Her
father is a chemical engineering
professor who served on SGC's
predecessor, the Student Affairs
Committee for its last three years
of existence.
In regard to her responsibilities
as Panhel president Miss Town-
send said, "I hestitate to call them
duties. When you work hard for
an organization, it's something
you want to do and you don't
think of it in that sense."
As a sidelight on the implica-
tions of the deferred rushing issue
Miss Townsend commented that
the sorority alumnae were won-
derful people. "I'm sad that people
are sometimes antagonistic to-
ward alums," she said, "they work
long and hard at a volunteer job
to keep the houses running. We
rely on them a great deal."
Great Educational Value
On the rushing issue itself Deb-
bie expressed an opinion that most
Panhel members derived a great
deal of educational value from
thinking the situation through
from an all, campus viewpoint.
"Frankly, the SGC decision sur-
prised us," she said, "but we in-
tend to cooperate with the new
plan."
Debbie, who cooks breakfast for
her Gamma, Phi Beta sorority sis-
ters every morning as she has for
the past two years commented
that probably one of the hardest
things she has had to learn in
Announcements
Now Available
Commencement announcements
are available now for seniors who
have ordered them.
They will be distributed today, to-
morrow and Thursday from 1:00
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Adminis-
trition Bldg.
RENT
a typewriter
and keep up
with your work

Heart Gains
Being Made
MHA Says
Gains in the fight against heart
disease are being made rapidly,
according to a recent report by
the Michigan Heart Association,
but the "assets" are still greatly
overbalanced by the "liabilities."
Although some forms of Leart
disease can be prevented and a
few can be cured, diseases of the
heart and circulatory system ac-
count for more than half of all
deaths in the United States, tak-
ing almosttwice as many lives an-
nually as the next five leading
causes of death combined.
Rheumatic fever, included in
the report among the preventable
heart diseases, has been declining
as a cause of death in the past
three decades.
Drugs Relieve Pressure
Malignant hypertension, a seri-
ous form of blood presure, can be
relieved by several drugs which
effectively lower pressure. Heart
disease caused by syphilis and
diptheria, serious only a decade
is rare today because of the ef-
fecetive prevention and cure of
the original infection.
Improved diagnostic techniques
have made it possible to recognize
more cases in time to ease the
course of heart disease through
careful medical management.
Among the more dramatic ad-
vances in treatment of heart di-
seases have been those in surgi-
cal techniques. Methods of sur-
gery have been devised to repair
heart valves dangerously scarred
and narrowed from rheumatic
fever and methods of grafting of
arteries and other forms of blood
vessel surgery are firmly estab-
lished.
New Techniques Developed
Other new tools and techniques.
include a "cardiac catheter," a
long tube pushed into the heart
through a vein to take blood sam-
ples and measure pressures and
"cross-circulation" methods and
"heart-lung" machines to replace
temporarily the function of the
heartandylungs during surgery.
The report emphasizes the eco-
nomic loss to the nation of hun-
dreds of millions of dollars an-
nually, as contrasted with the an-
nual fifteen to twenty million
from all sources spent specifically
to underwrite cardiovascular re-
search in the United States.
The most serious problem con-
fr" ting tn cardiovascular re-
searcher is the fact that the
causes of atheroscleriosis and high
blood pressure - responsible for
more than 90 percent of all deaths
from heart and blood conditions-
are still unknown. These are the
immediate goals of this research
in which the American Heart As-
sociation has. invested 55.2 per-
cent or $3.8 million of its total
budget.
Another facet of the American
Heart Association's expenditures
are funds spent for rehabilitation.
Last year 17 percent of the na-
tional association's funds went to-
ward this service.

(Continued from Page 2)
School, at 4:00 p.m. Chairman H. C.
Koch.
Doctoral Examination for Abdul Fat-
tah Qasim Chalabi, Civil Engineering;
thesis: "Laboratory Performance Study
Df Commercially Manufactured Concrete
Masonry Units Made with Lightweight
Aggregates," Tues., May 22, 2075 East
Engineering Bldg., at 3:30 p.m. Chair-
man, F. E. Legg, Jr.
Doctoral Examination for Chi-Jen
Chang, Geography; thesis: !"The Minor-
ity Groups of Yunnan and Chinese
Political Expansion into Southeast
Asia," Tues., May 22, 210 Angell Hall,
1:00 p.m. Chairman, George Kish.
Doctoral Examination for Walter
Hoffman, Mathematics; thesis: "Group
Logics and Restricted Implication,"
Tues., May 22, 3401 Mason Hall, at 3:00
p.m. Chairman, Frank Harary.
Doctoral Examination for Bruce Le-
Roy Nary, Speech; thesis: "A Study of
Major Lincoln Dramas in Relationship
to Selected Lincoln Biographies," Tues.,
May 22, West Council Room Rackham
Bldg., at 4:00 p.m. Chairman, W. P.
Halstead.
Doctoral Examination for Lee Erie
Danielson, Psychology; thesis: "Gam-
bling Proneness: Its Measurement and
Expression in Examination Situations,"
Tues., May 22, 7611 Haven Hall, at 8:00
s.m. Chairman, N. R. F. Maier.
Doctoral Examination for Carl Fran-
cis Keppler, English Language and Lit-
erature; thesis: "Symbioism in The
Ancient Mariner: A Study in Method,"
Wed., May 23, East Council Room, Rack-
ham Bldg., at 7:30 p.m. Chairman, N. E.
Nelson.
Doctoral Examination for F. Gerard
Adams, Economics; thesis: "Some .As-
pects of the Income Size Distribution:
A Statistical Study," Wed., May 23, 105

Economics Bldg., at 4:00 p.m. Chairman,
D. B. Suits.
Doctoral Examination for Monroe S.
Price, Education; thesis: "The Suscep-
tibllity to Distortion of the Minnesota
Attitude Inventory," Wed., May 23, East
Council Room, Rackham Bldg., at 8:00
A.m. Co-Chairmen, W. C. Morse and
H. G. Ludlow.
Doctoral Examination for .Albertine
Krohn, Chemistry; thesis: "The Elec-
trodeposition of Iron-Molybdenum Al-
loys," Wed., May 23, 303 Chemistry
Bldg., at 9:30 a.m. Chairman, L. 0.
Case.
Doctoral Examination for Charles Ed-
win Caton, Philosophy; thesis "A De-
scription and Evaluation of the Method
of the Ordinary-Language Philosophers
and its Doctorinal Basis," Wed., May
23, room 2214, Angell Hall, at 3:00 p.m.
Chairman, R. L. Cartwright.
Doctoral Examination for Kenneth
Walker Hann, Psychology; thesis: "Per-
sonality Correlates of Recognition and
Recall of Faces," Wed., May 23, 7611
Haven Hall, at 11:00 a.m. Chairman, E.
L. Kelly.
Doctoral Examination for George Al-
fred Elgas, Business Administration;
thesis: "The Multi-Line Firm in Rela-
tion to Competition," Tues., May 22,
8th floor conference room, Business Ad-
ministration, 4:00 p.m. Chairman, C. E.
Griffin.
Placement Notices
The Natinoal Music Camp announces
openings for Counselors (ARC Instruc-
tor's rating prefered) and stage crew.
See Mr. Jacobi, 303 S. State Street, above
Wagner's daily from 9-5.
The Following Schools have listed
vacancies on their teaching staff for
the 1956-1957 school year. They will not
send arepresentatives to the Bureau of
Appointments to Interview at this time.
Auburn Heights, Mich. (Avondale High
School)-Teacher needs: Home Econom-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN,

ics; English; Social Science, Speech and
Dramatics; vocal Music.
Cassopolis, Mich. - Teacher needs:
English/Latin; Elementary (1st, 2nd,
3rd); Gils' Phys. Ed.
Dearborn, Mich. - Elementary; Ele-
mentary Art; Nursery; Junior High Art;
English; Homemaking; Math/Science;
Music-Vocal; Physical Ed.-Girls'; Sci-
ence/Coaching; Senior High English;
English/Drama/Speech; English/Latin/
French; Industrial Arts/Auto Shop; Ma-
chine Shop; Science (Chemistry);
Science/Math/Coaching.
Deckerville, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Band/Chorus; Science (Chemistry/Phy-
sics/Math).
Euclid, Ohio-Teacher Needs Elemen-
tray; Junior High Art; Gen. Science/
Math; English/Social Studies; Vocal
Music ;Sen r High Spanish/English;
Industrial Arts; Home Economics; Social
Studies (woman); Girls' Physical Ed.;
Comprehensive Science; Math/Science;
Special Ed. (Supervisor, Slow Learners).
Fairlawn N. J. - Teacher needs:
Elementary; Junior High English/Social
Studies; Math/Science; Home Ec; Vocal
Music; Girls' Phys. Ed.; Guidance/Eng-
lish or Social Studies (woman); Indus-
trial Arts/Math; French/English; Span-
ish/English; Eenior High Science (Phy-
sics or Biology; Language (Latin with
Spanish or French); English/Social
Studies; Reading Consultants (Senior
High, Elementary); Helping Teacher
in Phys. Ed.-Elementary (woman).
Farmington, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Junior High Vocal Music; Coach (Track/
Cross Country); Senior High Math;
Commerce; English; Mechanical Draw-
ing.
Gaylord, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary (1st, 5th).
Gladwin, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Math (Geometry/Gen. Math); Com-
merce (Bookkeeping/typing/Shorthand);
Driver Training.
Greybull, Wyo. - Teacher needs:
Elementary (1st grade); High School
Math; English; Business Ed.; Music
(High School Voval/Beginner's Band).
Grosse I6, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary (Kdg., 1st Grade); Special

Ed.-Speech Correction; High School
Science (Chemistry/Physics); Commer-
cial (Typing/Bus. Subjects).
Los Angeles, Calif. (The Melrose
School) - Teacher needs: Elementary
(Grades 2 through 6, man or woman).
Madison Heights, Michigan - Teacher
needs: Elementary; Mentally Retarded.
Marysville, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementaryq (1st, 5th, 6th 7th); Li-
brarian; Speech Correctionist.
Milligton, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Driver Training/Junior High; English!
Social. Studies; Instrumental/Vocal
Music; Science/Math; Girls' Phys. Ed.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
There will be a meeting of the Sum-
mer Placement Service in Room 3G,
Michigan Union, Wed., May 23, from
1 to 4:45 p.m.
SUMMER PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS:
Representatives from the following
will be here to interview for summer
jobs, Room 3G, Michigan Union, 1 to
4:45 p.m.
Wed., May 23:
Martin Gold, Head Counselor, Camp
Farband, Chelsea, Mich., will interview
for General Counselors and men Scout-
craft Counselors.
Rush Cattell, Camp Cherokee, Steu-
ben, Mich., will interview for men
Counselors.
Arnet Cole, Ann Arbor YMCA, will
interview for Counselors.
Mrs. Wauters, Camp Hillton, will in-
terview for men and women Counselors.
Mrs. Glen Chamberlain will interview
for Waitresses and Hostess, for Point
Nipogan, Mich.
Terry Adderle, Russell Kelly Office
Service, will interview women for Typ-
ists, Stenographers, General Office
Clerks.
W. C. Wilson of Crowell-Collier Pub-
lishing Co., Detroit wlil interview men
for summer sales promotional jobs in
the Educational Division. (Not selling
magazines).
The Will-O-Way Apprentice Theater,
Bloomfeild Hills, Mich., will interview
actors and actresses.

I

--Daily-Bill 'Van Oosterhout
DEBBIE TOWNSEND-Ex-Panhellenic president pauses on the
ctn of th 'am Vh Rt.ari+ Htc

Ueps or Te uamma rr
college is who to talk to in the
morning.
"The milkman's always cheer-
ful," Miss Townsend said.
Debbie, a member of Scroll,
senior women's honorary society,
expressed her concern over the
fact that people in activities tend
to forget what activities mean.
Medical Firm'
Opens Essay
Competition
Schering Corporation has an-
nounced its annual essay -ompeti-
tion for medical students.
Entrants may choose one of
three topics proposed by the
Schering Awards Committee upon
which to investigate and write.
Topics included for this year's
competition include: "The Clini-
cal Use of Adrenocortical Steroids
in Collagen Diseases," "Metabolic
Aspects of the Aging Process," and
"New Applications of Antihista-
mines in Medicine and Surgery."
Cash prizes of $500 and $250
will be awarded to the writers of
the first and second place papers
respectively.
Application deadline for the
competition is September 30.

ui B ua sorority nouse.
"I think we are going overboard
in socially insisting that everyone
participate in them," she said.
"In the Big Ten we sometimes
forget to let other people lead
their own lives," she noted
"I think it is every bit as im-
portant for a good music student
to teach piano in the hospital, for
instance, as for me to have done
my job," she said.
It is too bad we nake a dis-
tinction between major and minor
activities she said. We should be
more concerned with having peo-
vie interested in something that
suits their talents rather than our
own interests she commented.
Wolverine Club
Positions Open
Students will be given a chance
to sign up for the Wolverine Club's
Block M from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00
p.m. next Monday and Tuesday
on the Diagonal.
Chairmanships on the operation,
public relations, membership and
facilities subcommittees are open
in the club. Students interested in
the positions are asked to contact
Dick Rusnak, '58, Block M chair-
man.

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6.

MR . C. BARNES
Former DETROIT HAIR STYLIST
is now with us!
TUESDAY - SATURDAY

The patient recovered, but the budget didn't
ii
You can't always prevent sickness. But you can hldp
prevent sickness from driving you into debt. For
information about our Sickness and Accident plans-
WILLIAM A. CLOSE
See BARRY F. WHITEHEAD
NO 3-4161
IRE PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA
a mutual life insurance company
North Central Home Office
Minneapolis, Minn.

Evening Appointments Available
Specializing in hair styling, shaping, and permanent waving.
RUTH'S BEAUTY SHOP
Main Floor Location
215 S. FIFTH AVE. PHONE NO 8-7249

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Organization
Notices

Portables
Standard Office Machines
Wide Carriage Machines
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State St.
Since 1908 Phone N08-7177

Riding Club: The University of Mich-
igan Riding Club will hold a dinner
ride tonight; all who wish to ride must
call Peg Davis, NO 3-4164 or Erwin
Perelstein, NO 3-4839 before 2:00 p.m.
They will be picked up in front of the
WAB at 6:00 p.m. The ride will cost
$3.50.
Westminster Student Fellowship:
Open House, today, 4:00-5:00 p.m.,
Presbyterian Student Center.
* 1 -
Kiwanis Eastern will meet tonight,
6:30 p.m., Union. Dr. James Davis,
Director of the Interantional Center,
will speak on "Friends Around the
World."

- - -------- lj

Have You Considered A
CAREER IN
RETAI LI NG
Retailing in a fascinating field, with the
intriguing challenge of a constantly
changing scene. There are more opportu-
nities in retailing than there are men and
women to fill them. These positions are
atttractive in financial reward for the im-
aginative and creative person. They offer
pleasant working conditions and reward-
ing careers for college graduates.
Jacobson's, an 87 - year - old Michigan
Fashion Institution, seeks young people
for its learn-by-doing training program,
offering a salary while learning, and even-

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bermuda short set

1 parts to our
one wonderful

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A sleeveless cotton shirt and
stitch-creased Bermuda

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shorts, plus Helenca stretch nylon
knee-hi socks.. . three-part
harmony for summer fun
and play.: Left: Striped and sdlid
set in khaki, olive, navy, red,
black, pink, blue or gold.
Right: Paisley print and solid
set in khaki, olive or beige.
Sizes 10 to 16.

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Complete set, 8.95

tual executive positions.

THE THIMBLE JACKET,.., pretty indispensable! a
gay mandarin top in crisp white pique . .. stopped
just short of the waist for fashion's most, important
empire look! a charming cover-up for bare or strap-
less dresses . . . for almost anything you own. Sizes
10 to 16; white only. $3.95.

Most of the important positions in this
rapidly growing business have been filled
from this training program.
SEE MR. FRIEDRICHS
OF OUR ANN ARBOR STORE
He will nladiv arranane for n anointment

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