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May 16, 1956 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-16

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I - ;'1

P-AGEt 19m

TTI V ISRC H I GAN DAILY'

WEDNESDAY. INIAY 1G, 1950

PAGE S!~ TIlE MICHIGAN DAILI WEIINESDAY, MAY 16,1956

_.

'U' English Professor Wins
Literary, Teaching Award,

Donald R. Pearce, assistant pro-
fessor of English at the University
yesterday was narned winner of
the annual Henry Russel award.
The $350 award is given to an
outstanding faculty member with
the rank of assistant professor or
below.
He is selected on the basis of
scholarship, as evidenced by pub-,
lications of work, teaching ability,
reputation among faculty and stu-
dents, and for other services to the
University.
Prof. Pearce has achieved dis-
tinction as a scholar and critic in
the field of contemporary litera-
ture. He is especially noted for his
studies on the literacy and philoso-
phical development of William B.
Yeats.
He Joined the University faculty
in 1947 as instructor of English
and was promoted to his assistant
professorship in 1952.
Prof. Pearce was graduated from
Brantford Collegiate Institute,
Ont., in 1936 and received his
Bachelor of Arts degree in 1940

Beta Kappa and held the Alfred
ii. Lloyd Postdoctoral Fellowship
from the' Rackham School of
Graduate Studies in 1949. Last
summer he wes awarded a Faculty
Research Grant.
The professor has made numer-
ous television appearances for the
University.
He received the award following
the Henry Russel Lecture given by
George E. Uhlenbeck, Henry Car-
hart professor of physics; on "The
Symmetry in Time and Other
Basic Symmetry Laws of Nature."
Prof. Pearce is married and has
three children,
Noted Guests
To Particiate
In TV Show
Mr. W. de St. Aubin, Executive
Director of the Washtenaw County
Red Cross, and Mr. Reginald H.
F~all, Gershwin Award winner, will
be the featured guests on "'Dateline
Ann. Arbor" over WPAG-TV, at
6:45 p.m. tonight.
The topic of the interview with
Mr. St. Aubin will be the Red Cross
Recognition Day, which will be
observed in Washtenaw County on
Thursday.
Mr. Hall has recently returned
from New York City where he
heard his "Elegy for Orchestra
played by the New York Philhar-
monic Orchestra under the direc-
tion of Dimitri Metropoulos.
His composition and its per-
formance will be discussed on the
program. An Ann Arbor civil en-
gineer, Mr. Hall won the George
Gershwin Memorial Award for his
composition.
"Dateline Ann Arbor" is a pres-
entation of the University of Mich-
igan Department of Speech and
University Television over WPAG-
TV.

w,, -- FOUR YEARS AGO THE MISSOURI RIVER,
NTAN1' ON A SPRING RAMPAGE, FLOODED MORE
FTPECK COMPLETED 1938 NOR TH DAKQTA THAN TWO MILLION ACRES OF LAND, DIS-
4 PLACED 87,000 PEOPLE AND DID 119
GARRISON _MILLION DOLLARS IN DAMAGE
CAN IT HAPPEN AGAIN?
"NO," SAY ARMY ENGINEERS. THEY CITE
y THESE NEW MAJOR RESERVOIRS:
GARRISON DAM (COMPLETED,1955)
FORT RANDALL DAMI(COMPLETED 1955)
gAVINS POINT DAM (SOME WORK STILL
CA 14%COMPLETE r UNDER WAY)
W O I .M #MINN
C. .~.
0 - -
Y.. IN TY
a "yv
CEBRAs
MOKYWL EIE.. . TPK ~ KANSAST
+R ESE RVOIRS COMPL ETE D OR
-4+ UNDER CONSTRUCTION
SRE ERVOIRS AUThORIZED
OAPPROVED AP Newsfeatures
New Dams Tame Wild Missouri River

I

HEY!
You're Nuts!
if
You don't
Pick up your
Ensian
This Week !
Student Publications Bldg.
Q 5:

I

IF

By CLARENCE JOHNSON

KANSAS CITY ()--It was April,
1952.,
The Wild Missouri was on a
rampage.
All along the 2,400-mile course
of the stream from the Montana
Rockies to St. Louis, the Big Mud-
dy was carrying a heavy burden
of water from the spring thaw.
The surging water jumped the
banks. It crumbled levees. It flood-
ed more than 2,122,000 acres of
land.
More than 87,000 persons were
displaced from their homes,
'Whopping' Loss
The loss, in terms of money,
added up to a whopping 179 mil-
lion dollars.
Can it happen again?$
"No" is the confident appraisal

PROF. DONALD R. PEARCE
... scholar and critic

from the University ofN
Ontario. His advanced
came from the University
and 1948.

Western
degrees
in 1941

He holds membership in Phi

I

f

of the people who have had an
active part in taming the Wild
Missouri,
Major destructive floods in the
upper and middle reaches of the
Missouri River are a thing of the
past.
This comes from Brig. Gen. W.
E. Potter, Omaha, Missouri River
division engineer for the U.S. Army
Engineers. Ever since the 1952
record flood, Gen. Potter has been
in charge of Missouri River flood
control operations,
He confined his appraisal to the
upper and middle parts of the
river because there are no major,
flood control works on the un-
predictable Kansas River, which
went on a spree in 1951.
Four Mainstem Reservoirs
Gen. Potter points to four major
mainstem reservoirs where there
was only one in 1952. These dams,
he explains, have a sufficient ca-
pacity to reduce a flood--such as
the one in 1952-to well within the
banks of Omaha and St. Joseph,
Mo.
As shown on the accompanying
map, the mainstream reservoirs
now in existence are the Fort Peck
in Montana, the Garrison in North
Dakota and the Fort Randall and
Gavins Point, both in South Da-
kota.
Fort Peck was the oply one in
operation four years ago. Its total
cost is estimated at 1561 million
dollars, which is about 25 million
dollars less than the total flood
loss on the Missouri in 1952.
The Engineers figure that the

presence of Fort Peck Dam in 19521
was enough to enable Omaha to
escape an additional 62 million
dollars loss in the flood. The
combined loss at Omaha and
Council Bluffs, Ia., has been placed
at 621 million dollars.
The Oahe Dam
A fifth ,major dam, the Oahe,
north of Pierre, S. Dak., is expect-
ed to be about 22 per cent complete
by the end of 1956. Another, Big
Bend, south of Pierre, has not been
started.
When the six main stem dams
are in operation ,the Army Engi-
neers figure they will have 72
million acre feet of storage-al-
most three times the average an-
nual flow of the river at Sioux
City.
In addition, 18 smaller dams
have been completed since 1952 by
the Engineers and the Bureau o'f
Reclamation. Thirteen others are
under construction and scores of
others are on the future list.
Hold Back Water
As it stands this April, the
Missouri Valley not only has three
more dams to hold back the water,
but because of drought all of them
have greater storage capacity.
And Mother .Nature, herself, ap-
pears in a cooperative mood this
year.
The 1952 flood was the result of
a heavy snowfall in the Upper
Plains, the Dakotas, Montana and
Wyoming. The snow had accumu-
lated to a depth of 20 inches in
some places during the winter.
Underneath the snow pack was ice.

So when the spring thaw came,
the water had no way of penetrat-
ing the ice sheet. There was only
one place for the 'water to go-
down the slopes, into the creeks
and rivers and finally the Missouri.
This spring the snowpack situa-
tion is nore favorable, the Engi-
neers say. They look for a normal
runoff.
Men Initiated
To Quadrants
At South Quad
The Quadrants have searched
South Quadrangle.
The light from their lamp shines
on the record of all.
Those who are deserving of re-
ward reflect the rays of the lamp
of the Quadrants.
Their achievements shine in
glory,
What they have done they have
done well.
From South Quadrangle came:
Tony Bronzo, '57, Joe Collins,
'58, William Ginter, '57E, Bill
Hanks, '56BAd, Pete Harris, '57E,
Russ Holland, '58, John Katherler,
'58E, John Mayne, '58, Jesse Mey-
ers, '57, William Millar, '58, Paul
Mott, Grad., Robin Ollivier, '57E,
Eldon Olson, '58, and Russ Wells,
'57E,
James R. Davis, Grad., Honor-
ary Quadrant.

}1

vt

DAIY O FICALBULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4) 1 pointments contact the Bureau o p¬ęSME LCMN NEVES

4

"

t

EvetsToday
Free Films. 4th floor Exhibit Hall,
Museums Bldg. "Birds of the Seashore"
and "Seashore Oddities," May 15-21.
Daily at 3:00 and 4:00 p.m.. including
Sat, and Sun., with extra showing Wed.
a t 12:30.
Placement Notices
The Polytechnic Institute of Puerto
Rico at San German, Puerto Rico has
the followin gvacancies on their teach-
ing staff for the 1956-57 school year.
They are not sending a representative
to the Bureau of Appointments to in-
terview candidates at this time. Teach-
ers are needed in the following fields:
Chemistry; Economics & Business Ad.
ministration; English; History; Home
Economics; Music; Psychology; Religion
& Philosophy Sociology; Education.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext.-
v489..
The Following Schools will have rep-
iresentatives at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments to interview candidates for
teaching positions starting in Septem-
ber, 1956.
Thursday, May 17:
' Highland Park, Mich.-Teacher needs:
Elementary (Kdg. to 6th); Library;
Phys. Ed. Girls'; Art; Homemaking;
Junior High Homeroom; High School
Math; English; Phys. Ed. Girls; Driver
Training; Library; Physics; Chemistry;
Biology; visiting Teawher.,
River Rouge, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary (Kdg., 2nd, 2nd3rd, 5th,
6th); Art; Vocal Music/English or His-
tory; Special Ed. (Type C); Math{
Science/English/Social Studies; Girls'
Phyvs. Ed.
Rockwood, Mich.- Teacher needs,
Elementary; Elem, Vocal Music; Reme-
dial Reading.
Fri., May 18:
Roseville, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary; Junior High Math; Girls'
Phys. Ed.; General Science; Library;
HIgh School English; Home Ec; Indus-
trial Arts.
For additional information and ap-
,r ,-~
p1/'
We're cut tonight, Mom
I've promised to take you
for a half pound Chuck
Wagon Steak wrapped in
bacon, We'lI find it at the

pointments, 3528 Administration Bldg., Representatives from thefllowing
NO 3-1511, Ext. 489. .will be here to interview for summer

PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
The National Advisory Committee for
Aeronautics announces an examination
for Aeronautical Research Scientists. It
is open to people in Engrg. or In Physics,
Electronics, Applied Math,, Chemistry,
Metallurgy.
Alco Products, Inc., Schenectady, N.Y.,
fofers employment opportunities to
Mech., Elect., Chem.E., Civil, Metal., Nu-
clear E., Physics, Chemistry and Math.
U.S. Civil Service Commission an-
nounces an examination for Agricul-
tural Engineer (Research), GS-7 to
GS-14.
Armstrong Cork Co., Lancaster, Pa.,
has an opening in the Bureau of In.
terior Decoration for a Decorator-De-
signer. Women graduating in June are
eligible to apply.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 371.
SPECIAL NOTICE:
A number of students have not yet
brought their second semester elections
into the Bureau of Appointments. It is
necessary for us to have these elcetions
'in order to keep the records up-to-date.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
There will be a meeting of the Sum-
mer Placement Service in Room 3G,
Michigan Union, Thurs., May 17, from
1 to 4:45 p.m.

job Room 3G, Michigan Union, 1 to'
4:45 p.m.
Thursday, may i
Martin Gold, Head Counselor, Camp
Farband, will interview men and women
for Arts & Crafts Counselors.
Rush Cattell, Canip Cherokee, Steu-
ben, Mich,, will interview for men
Counselors.
Arnet Cole, AnnArbor MA will
interview for Counselors.
Miss Diane Richardson, Southern Oak-
land Girl Scouts, will interview for
Counselors.
Mrs. Wauters, Camp Hilltop, will in-
terview for men and women Counselors;

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