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May 05, 1956 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-05

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PAGE 81X

THE CHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1956

WAGE SIK THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY. MAY 5.1956

DURDIN LECTURE:
Nationalism Forceful in Southeast Asia

Flutist Gives Views,
Philosophy on Music

PAINTINGS, ETCHINGS:
Art Museum Exhibits Graduate Works

I I

By MARILYN WOOD)
"In the Southeast Asian area
nationalism and colonialism are
antagonistic but very much a part
of each other," Tillman Durdin
said yesterday.
Speaking in Rackham Aiphi-
theatre ,Durdin, chief correcpond-
ent of the New York Times in
Southeast Asia, said this region is
a specially suitable laboratory for
this study because the six coun-
tries in the area have ceased to
be colonial and have become in-
dependent within tie last ten
years.
Indonesia seems to be the most
nationalistically sensitive of the
Southeast Asia countries, the for-
eign reporter remarked. "This is
due in large measure to the,partic-
ularly heavy-handed and oppres-
sive nature of Dutch rule there"
'Sukarno Is Nationalistic'
Indonesian President Sukarno is
"the miost purely nationalistic of
the many passionate nationalists
found in Asia today," he com-
mented.
The Philippines are an example
of a more moderate Asian nation-
alism in ex-colonial country. Pre-
vious American rule in the region
appears to be the reason for this.
Filipinos look toward Americans
and Europeans in their midst with
less resentment than the Indone-
sians, Durdin said. They are more
ready to cooperate with the ex-
colonial power and other Western
powers, he continued. Philippine
President Magsaysay openly de-
clares himself pro-American.
Attitudes Are Similar
"Natipnalistic attitudes in Thai-
land ar somewhat similar to those
in the Philippines," Durdin said,
"but they are evenmore relaxed
and less anti-Western."
Of the other ex-colonial South-
east Asian countries, Burma tends
to.be more like Indonesia - ex-
tremely sensitive to nationalism.
The feeling is less intense, at least
in an anti-Western sense, ik the
other five countries, he comment-
'ed.
One aspect of the colonialist in-
fluence on Southeast Asian na-
tionalism Is its consequences on
the personal behavior of the West-
LSA Steering
Committee's
.urpose Told
Literary College Conference
Steering Committee was formed in
1950 by Dean Peake of the literary
college to assist the college's ad-
ministration in dealing with prob-
lems of educational concern. The
group's purpose is to provide a
sounding board for student opin-
ion in areas of administrative
study and researh.
Accepting petitions for student
membership each year, the steer-
ng committee functions as a dis-
cussion group and selects topics for
student-faculty conferences:
Now attached to the office of
Dean James A. Robertson, of the
Literary College, the committee is
chaired by David E. Levy, '57.
"Education has become a high
voltage commodity in America and
with this emphasis state univer-
sities have been subject to drastic
growth. Out of these trends an
entirely new problem area has
arisen which should be of concern
to both students and educators,"
Levy says.
Two conferences held this year
have dealt with intellectual curi-
osity in the literary college student
body and with the college's coun-
seling system.
The final conference of the sea-

son will be held at 7:30 p.m. Thuts-
day in the Union. It is entitled,
"Why a Liberal Education?-the
Function of a Literary College."
The meeting will begin with a
brief panel presentation by Prof.
Arthur M. Eastman and Prof.
Marvin Felheim, both of the Eng-
lish department, and Prof. Roger
W. Heyns, of the psychology de-
partment. Informal discussion will
follow the panel:

-Daily-Bill Van Oosterhout
REPORTER AND REGENT-Eugene Power, Regent of the Uni-
versity, introduced Tillman Durdin it a lecture sponsored by
the political science department, yesterday.

ern colonial peoples. This is no-
ticeable in all ex-colonial coun-
tries of the region.
Resentments Linger
Another aspect of nationalism
in Southeast Asia is that resent-
ments, bred of social ostracization,
linger even after independence.
At the present time the two
main forces in Asia are "genuine

non-communist nationalism and
communism," Durdin said.
He added, "Communism has pa-
raded in the garments of nation-
alism."
"Non-communist democratic na-
tionalism in Southeast Asia is the
area's best safeguard against com-
munist control," the New York
Times correspondent said.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Following is the
fifth in a series of articles covering
this year's May Festival.)
By CAROL PRINS
"Music must be abstract in order
to appreciate it."
William Kincaid, solo flutist in
the Philadelphia Orchestra com-
mented on his philosophy of music.
The courtly white-haired musician
said, "Too much emphasis .is put
on technical knowledge of music.
Tht listener doesn't have to recog-
nize every diminished seventh
which is played. He should sit
back, relax and enjoy the music as
a whole.
"Although music is a science to
the performer, he should not let
the listener realize this," Kincaid'
continued. "The music should
come to the audience as an emo-
tional experience.
"In his opera, 'Tristan and Isol-
de,' Wagner makes use of certain
musical techniques to create a
mood of desire," Kincaid said, "but
the listener doesn't have to realize
what these techniques are to ap-
preciate the music. The composer,
just as the performer, has to use
good old-fashioned horse sense in
creating a mood.
Imagination Is Necessary
"Although the musician and the
composer have to have the 90%
technical ability, without the 10%
imagination they are nothing,"
Kincaid said. "An artist must
know the technique but be re-
moved from it."
Kincaid commented, "too many
people are searching for perfection
in music-they search for the best
and miss the musician who has
something to say. I don't attempt
to make flawless music," he con-
tinued." To make pleasurable
music is the most important thing.
"Often young critics feel they must
find a flaw in the music," the
Minnesota born musician said.
"They assume if they don't find
fault with a performance, people
will believe that they don't know
anything."
'Play A Few Years'
"I often notice this tendency
in my young pupils' atittude,"
Kincaid said. "I tell them to play
a few years, and then criticize
after obtaining some experience."
Kincaid, who teaches at the
Curtiss Institute of Music in Phila-
delphia, said, "while students are
inclined to be more critical, by

the same token, they are more ap-
preciative and demonstrative than
the average audience."
He went on, "Often when stu-
dents start out at a very young
age, perhaps at seven as I did, the
joy of playing builds up, talent or
genius develops, and they turn to
music as a profession at a very
young age-much before others
decide on a career. This way, the
joy of music becomes so instilled
in them it is difficult to think of
the world as apart from music."
'Music Is Satisfying'
The tall, ruddy musician remi-
nisced: "Music is a very satisfying
profession. On our recent Euro-
pean tour, in 1955, we 'traveled
through 11 countries and 17 cities.
He chuckled, "You know, Euro-
peans are very demonstrative, they
shout and whistle and are gener-
ally very emotional-especially in
the Latin countries. It is very
different than the reserved atti-
tude of American audiences."
Continuing thoughtfully, Kin-
caid said, "It's strange after play-
ing for such a long time, I have
no favorite selection. Whatever you
are playing is the most important
thing. I enjoy all kinds of music-
the cold, massiveness of Sibelius'
works, which reflect the nature of
his native Finland as well as the
decidedly French works of Ravel."
Kincaid, whose father was a
Presbyterian minister, began his
musical career playing the piano
and pipe organ in his father's
church. He continued his studies
in the Hawaiian Islands while his
family lived there. Later he studied
in New York City at the Institute
of Musical Art, "the forerunner of
the Jullaird School." He then play-
ed with the'New York Symphony
under.the baton of Walter Dam-
rosch.
Played Solo Flute
After "concertizing" for two
years throughout the United
States, Kincaid joined the Phila-
delphia Orchestra where he occu-
pied the solo flute chair under
Leopold Stokowski's direction.
Concluding, Kincaid commented,
"I would say to young musicians
not to attempt the profession un-
less they have three things-a
fine sense of rhythm, a sense of
pitch and the ability to produce a
tone, on an instrument or by voice.
"Most of all, I would say, they
must love music. They must see
the world in relation to their art."

By RENE GNAM
Opening today in Alumni Me-
morial Hall's Museum of Art is
an exhibition of paintings, etchings
and drawings by University gradu-
ate students in the College of
Architecture and Design.
The exhibit, last of the 1955-56
season, will run through May 27.
Art works on display are "an
impressive grouping of some of
the best paintings by our graduate
students in the College of Archi-
tecture and Design," according to
Prof. Jean Paul Slusser, curator
of the museum.
Interpretations Displayed
Prof. Slusser said the exhibit is
"the first showing of graduate
works in the museum." He pointed
out that a variety of art interpre-
tations are on display.
James H. Anthony, teaching fel-
low in the architecture and design
school, is chairman of the show.
Anthony, who won a purchase'
prize for watercolor in the South
Bend Michianna Show this spring,

r. .,s

4

says he tries "to find a balance
between the objective and the
non-objective and form an inte-
gration of both."
Robert Kiley, another exhibiting
artist, expresses the hope that "this
is the first of a possible series of
annual exhibitions" similar to the
current display.
Kiley Comments
Kiley, majoring in painting,
points out that "It is an excellent
idea to show people the quality" of
paintings by University graduate
students.
Last year, 15 of Kiley's paintings
were displayed in the Meltzer Gal-
lery in New York City.
Watercolors of Donald R. Math-
eson, retired army colonel now
studying print making at the Uni-
versity, are also on exhibit. Mathe-
son was last year's recipient of
the Cranbrook purchase prize for
watercolor in Detroit.
Lithographs Exhibited
William Reid McIntyre, major-
ing in print making and sculptur-

Come

to C'hurch

ing, has done several lithographs
and etchings, now on display. Reed
exhibited sculpture at the Michi-
gan Artists Show in Detroit last
fall.
James Eldridge works, recently
displayed in the Michigan Academy
of Arts and Sciences show, are on
exhibition. Eldridge is a teaching
fellow in the College of Architec-
ture and Design.
Works of Elizabeth P. Sand, for-
mer student at the Art Students
League in New York City, and
Bruce Gabel, are also on display.
Gabel, Matheson,, McIntyre and
Anthony are members of the Mich-
igan Print Makers Society.
List Officers
Senior class -officers for the
School of Music were announced
today.
They are James 0. Heier, presi-
dent, Judy Arnold, vice-president,
Kathryn Leo, secretary and Doris
Linton, treasurer.

'I

Sunday

i

Medicine, Politics Planned As

DiscussionTopics on TV
Groping for the right word is a
frustrating experience which, for of the program will b
people suffering from aphasia, is a uel Eldersveld, oft
perpetual problem, according to science department a
this week's University of Micnigan sity.
Television Hour at 10 a.m. Sunday, Since , voters this;
on WWJ-TV. selecting a large nun
Aphasic patients from the Uni- cers on all political li
versity Speech Clinic will appear cal party must run ,
with Dr. Irwin Brown, director of taneous campaigns.
the aphasic division, to demon- candidates and issues
strate their unusual problems. ous levels requires
Aphasia is a condition resulting strategy and manage:
from damage to the cerebral cortex
(outer layer) of the brain after "i
an external blow or internal stroke. Organiza
Although the intellect is largely o e
unaffected, the patient loses his
ability to communicate verbally,
and is often paralyzed on one American Institute<
side. F Business meeting, May
Since 1L46 special classes at the Rm. 246, Architecture B
clinic have taught the spastics how . . .
to articulate, express abstract and Graduate outing club
complex thought and regain use of welcome to join us on aI
the spoken word. Program host will Meet at 2:00 p.m. behind:
be Dr. Richard Judge, of the Wear old clothes. Supp
University Hospital. Come if it rains.
On the second half of the pro- Hillel Foundation: Sat
gram, the multiple campaign duties Sabbath service, 9:00 a.
of .state political chairmen in a Sunday evening Suppe
presidential election year will be by film, "Assignment T
described by John Feikens, Repub- dinner, 6:00 p.m.; fi]
lican state chairman, and Neil Hillel.
Staebler, Democratic state chair- Newman Club: The
man. The host for this segment will,, l, its.., r ~

Hour
e Prof. Sam-
the political
t the Univer-
year will be
mber of offi."
evels, a politi-
mnany simul-
Condition of
s on she vari-
complicated
ment.

7,tion

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M.:, 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings -- 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M. Friends Meeting.
10:45 A.M. Sunday School.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
William B. Hutchinson, Eugene A. Ransom
Ministers.
9:00 and .10:45 A.M. Worship, "Christ Confronts
Key Issues." Dr. Abbey preaching.a
9:30 A.M. Two Discussion Groups: Problems of'
Christian Belief, and Paul's Faith and World
Religions.
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program. Dr. Preston W.
Slosson, Professor, History Department will
speak on, "Why, as a Christian I vote Demo-
cratic_"~
7:30rP.M. Fireside Forum. Dr. Wilma Donahue,
Institute for HumanrAdjustment, will speak on,
"Understanding Your Older Folks."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, Open daily.

_ I

of Architects:
7, 4:00 p.m.,
ldg.
All Grads are
hike tomorrow.
Raekham Bldg.
er at 6:00 p.m.
Lurday morning
m., Hillel.
r Club followed
el Aviv," May 6,
I., 7:30 p.m.,
Newman Club
s in Dina

SUITS 'and SPORTCOATS
Nthe same that are
SOLD NATIONALLY
at the same low prices!
SAVE $10 to $15 on a suit.

11

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN'
(Continued from Page 4)
company, and this department performs
all of the staff functions involved in
the purchase, operation, maintenance,
and the replacement of a fleet of 7,400
vehicles.
For appointments contact the Engrg.
Placement Office, 347 W.E., Ext. 2182.
Representatives from the following
will be at the-Bureau of Appointments:
Tues., May 9:
Western Adjustment & Inspection Co.,
Hdgs., Chicago, Ill. - men in LS&A and
BAd for Insurance Adjuster Training.
The work is throughout the North
Central States.
For appointments contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
Ext. 371.

w,. *oa i0 OsAnnual Jp ng.wi nner
Dance, May 19, at the Michigan League.
There will be an Honors Convocation
and Professional Entertainment and
dancing. Reservations must be in by
eoday; Call Norman Miller, NO 3-0521,
Ext. 18, or purchase your tickets at
the Newman Club.
Student Religious Association: Folk
Dancing at Lane Hall, May 7, 7:30-10:00
p.m. in the recreation room. Instruc-
tion for every dance and beginners are
welcome.
* * *
Students for Stevenson: Reception
with guest, Mrs. Edison Dick, National
Chairman of "Stevenson for President
Committee," May 7, 7:30 p.m., Michigan
League.
* s *
Unitarian Student Group: Dr. Ed-
ward Redman will speak on "Human-
ism," May 6, }'7:00 p.m., Unitarian
Church, 1917 Washtenaw. Rides will
leave at 6:45 p.m. from Lane Hall,
Martha Cook, and Stockwell.
* . *
Young Friends: Professor Kenneth
Boulding will speak on "Christianity
and Modern Economics," May 6, 7:15
p.m., Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
Supper at 6:30 p.m.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets.
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: GOD IN THE
HOME.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
THECONGREGATIONAL AND DISCIPLES GUILD
7:00 P.M., Memorial Christian Church. Speaker:
Mrs. Doris Reed Rumman: THE WORLD AT
OUR DOOR.'
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "The Assurance of
Adequate Resources."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
" Club, Supper and Program. Talk and discussion
on "The Twentieth Century Christian and Faith
Hea ing."
Thursday at 7:30 P.M. Ascension Day Vesper
Service, with sermon by the pastor, "The As-
surance of a Concerned Intercessor."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service.
7.00 Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Andrew Missiras
April 29, Palm Sunday:
10:30 A.M. Holy Week Services-April 29 to
May 5.
Sunday, Monday & Tuesday-Vespers, 7:30 P.M.
Wednesday, May 2-Sacrament of Holy Unction,
7:30 P.M.
Thursday, May 3-Divine Liturgy, 7 A.M.
Reading of 12 Gospels, 7:30 P.M.
Good Friday, May 4:
Holy Hours 9:30 A.M. Solemn Procession of Tomb,
7:30 P.M.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Morse Saito, Student Director
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon: "Men Ought
Always to Pray," Reverend Press.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9 & 11 A.M. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
7 P.M. Lutheran Student Assn. Meeting -
Regional Conference Reports.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Cornet State & Huron Streets
William C Bennett, Pastor.
10 o'clock Sunday School.
11:00 "Hollowing the Home."
6:00 Student Guild.
7:00 "The Lack of the Spirit."
Wednesday 7:30 Prayer Meeting.
We Welcome You.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M. Church School and Junior Church,
10:45 A.M.-Public Worship. Dr. Parr's subject is
"THROUGH THESE MEN"' based on John Ma-
son Brown's recent book.
5:30 P.M. Pilgrim Fellowship.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild. Speaker, Mrs. Doris
Reed Rummon-subject "The World at our
Door."

'A

'*1

4
4

h

t,

ye have just received
our new Summer Suits

v

tI' '

"LOCAL HOME OF RICHMAN BROS. CLOTHING"
113 S. MAIN

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8 o'clock Holy Communion at St. Andrew's Church.
(Breakfast at the Canterbury House following
the 9 o'clock),
11 o'clock Morning prayer and sermon.
5:45 Buffet Supper.
6:45 Speaker, Mr. Warner G. Rice, "C. S. Lewis."
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Chester H. Loucks and Duane L. Day, Min-
isters. Student Advisor: Beth Mahone.
9:45 The student class will begin a series of dis-
cussions on the life and character; of Jesus.
11:00 Sermon: "God's Time Is the Best." Reverend
Day.
6:45 The Roger Williams Fellowship will have as
its speaker the Reverend Richard Cummings of
Detroit,
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH

4
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jor gr0dutes ut-ran j or n
matheatics. 2'
eng'rig or p
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I

At . MT, s Lin n yab mt ry n Lexi gton,
RAND is helping to delelop programs
for the ewSAGE system of continentd
air defense. The SAGE system, prhaps
Abe most advanced and comprehensive effort
tward eomplete amtomation yet attempted,
i centered aroand the largest and most
,ricate digital comprter designed to
date. At Santa Monica, RAND's System
Devdopme t Division is using IBM's
701 and 704 computers in a scientific
Program for be Air Defense Command.

1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister.
10:00 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group with Dr. Bur-
lingame of Adrian College on: "An Alterna-
tive to War."
11:00 A.M. Services of Worship: Rev. Edward H.
Redman preaching on: "A Clear and Meaning-
ful 'Worship."
7:30 P.M. Unitarian Student group. Mr. Red-
man speaking on: "Humanism."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday: Church Services at 9:15 A.M and 11:00
A.M. Seminar at 11:00 A.M. "Christianity and
World Tensions," led by Dr. Lionel Laing of the
Political Science Department.
6:45 P.M.-Professor Huntley will speak on
"Christianity and the Intellect."
Monday: "Coffee Break" from 3:30-5:30 P.M. at
Pat Pickett's apartment, 217 S. Observatory.
Tuesday: Open House from 4:00-5:00 P.M.
"Question Box" dliscussion-" Friendship," at

-4

i _,

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue
Ann Arbor, Michigan

I

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11,

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