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May 04, 1956 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MMM

M MAY, MAY 4, 1956

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

PAGE S t

-V I

- FI~JDAY. MAY 4, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAfl1~ M~IV

a imAAL/ UJ

14.4 T DWIT

lich igan

Nine

Loses

to

Notre

Dame,

6-5

GOLFERS
PRACTlICE
RANGE
NOW OPEN
on US 23 and Packard Rd.

Ninth Inning Rally Decisive;

SN T RIANGU LAR MEET:
Golfers Play OSU, Purdue at Lafayette

Face Northwestern Today

Special To The Daily
SOUTH BEND, Ind. - Weak
mound work in the late innings
made the difference as Michigan's
baseball team blew a five run lead,
losing 6-5 to Notre Dame here
yesterday.
Michigan will be attempting to
avenge this second straight loss
when it runs up against North-
western today in a single Confer-
ence game at Evanston. Don Pol-
oskey is scheduled to pitch.
Ninth Inning Rally
Two runs in the bottom of the
iainth were enough to clinch the
victory for the Irish, who had
gone Into the inning one run nbe-
hind.
Glenn Girardin, Michigan's
fourth pitcher of the game and
the eventual loser, started the final
frame by walking Notre Dame's
leadoff man, Jim Carideo. The
next batter, Ed Hurley, then belted
a long triple into deep right field,
driving in the tying run.
With the potential winning run
poised on third, and nobody out,
Coach Ray Fisher waved in a fifth
pitcher, Dick Peterjohn, in an at-
tempt to get out of trouble. Peter-
john walked the first man to face
him, but struck out the next.
. Thad was all. Notre game's
next hitter, catcher Elmer Kohorst,
slammed a tremendous drive into
deep left field. Hurley came trot-
ting home, and the ball game was
over,
'M'n Five Ahead
.The reversal of Michigan's for-
tunes, which went from a five run
lead in the fifth inning to the
final loss, was largely due to a
change of pitchers.
Bruce Fox, who started the game
pitched beautiful ball for five full
einnings.rHe allowed only three
hits, gave up on runs, and struck
out one. His control and change
up were w~rking perfectly.
Fox had a rather bad cold, how-
ever, and at the end of the fifth
he. did not feel well enough to
continue. Fisher therefore had to
replace him. This seemed to be
the turning point.
Error Scores One
Jim Clark took the mound and
was reached for a run immediate-
ly in the sixth on two singles and
an error by third baseman Steve
Boros.
In the seventh, the Irish really
began to threaten. Clark gave up
three straight singles to Joe Sene-
cal, Tom Jujnowski, and Carideo.
This scored another run and a

wild pitch put runners on second
and third.
Mark Ferrelli then came in to
pitch for Michigan. He got two
men out and walked one to fill the
bases before Kohorst came through
with a single to drive in two runs,
making the score 5-4 with Michi-
gan still holding on to its lead.
Ferrelli was removed at this point
in favor of Giradin who forced
Mike Lesso to pop out, ending the.
game.
Michigan did all its scoring in
the fourth and fifth innings. Three
runs came in the fourth on three
hits. Howie Tommelein led off
with a single and Ken Tippery
followed suit, sending Tommelein
to second.
Sider Hits in Three
Steve Borossthen tried a sacrifice
bunt and was safe at first on a
fielder's choice. With the bases
loaded, Sigman popped out and
Bob Sealby struck out. Catcher
Snider drove in the three base
runners with a long double which
just cleared the outfielder's head.
He died on second when Frank
Ronan popped out to end the
inning.
In the fifth inning Michigan col-
lected two more runs on a double
by Fox, a pass to Tippery, a passed
ball, and then a single off the bat
of Boros.
Fisher was disappointed with the
outcome, but the Wolverine's field-
ing and hitting was decidedly im-
proved over the past few games.
-Michigan collected ten hits in all
and the five runs should have been
enough to win. Only one error was
committed yesterday.
TeamIn Poor Health
One factor that did not help the
team any was their health. Be-
sides Fox's cold, Tommelein, who
was going to pitch against the
Irish, also had a cold was running
a slight fever. He played in left
field, however, and collected two
hits.
Also under the weather were
Sigman and Boros, who played, but
were not at the peak of efficiency.
Sigman left the game in the sixth
and Bill Thurston took his place in
right field.
Late-Inning Lapse

By AL WINKELSTEIN
Can the Wolverine golfers do it
again?
That is the question that will
be answered Saturday when the
linksters meet two of the strong-
est teams in the Big Ten. They
will play Ohio State and Purdue,
for the second week in a row in a
triangular meet at Lafayette Ind.
Last week, Michigan pulled one
of the big surprises of the young
golf season when they took top
honors in a quadrangular meet
against the Boilermakers and
Buckeyes. Indiana rounded out
the field of four teams.
For th eWolverines, ho are un-

HALF OF 'M' GOLF SQUAD, who will compete in the triangular
meet against Purdue and Ohio State at Lafayette on Saturday
standing with Coach Bert Katzenmeyer. Left to right are Bob
McMasters, John Schubeck, Skip MacMichael, and Katzenmeyer.

defeated in Big Ten competition,
this season, the triangular meet
may prove to be their roughest test
until the conference championship
at Evanston later this month.
Michigan will face the same two
teams plus Northwestern in a
quadrangular meet here next
All those who intend to par-
ticipate in the rugby match on
May 12 should report for a final
practice run tomorrow at 2:30
p.m. at the I-M Building.
-Pete Barnard
weekend, but they will have the
friendly confines of the University
golf course to help them.
This week, Purdue will have the
advantage, playing on their home
course.
Michigan will use all seven of
its regular players in the meet.
They will play the extra man
against Purdue, and use only six
against Ohio State.
Micklow Outstanding
The brilliant play of junior
Fred Micklow has been one of the
big factors in Michigan's recent

victories. At Columbus last week-
end, Micklow tied teammate Bob
McMasters for medalist honors. In
the University of Detroit meet here
Tuesday, Micklow fired a sizzling
par 72 to tie Detroit's Tom Wat-
rous for low score.
In Tuesday's match, the excep-
tional depth of the link squad was
shown again, when six of the seven
golfers of the Michigan team broke
80.
However, Coach Bert Katzen-
meyer was not completely satis-
fled with the squad's performance
against Detroit, pointing out that
the team will have to shoot better
golf if it is to figure as a threat
for Big Ten honors.
Michigan winds up its home
season one week from Saturday
when it plays OSU and Purdue in
the third and final round of its
dual meet series.

TALBERT ASKS MACKAY:
Star 'M' Netter Invited To England

STUDY NOW
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aspire to a broader education
through foreign study and travel,
the Institute of European Studies
dedicates its program.
Students live in Austrian homes
and attend the English taught
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Price covers: round trp ocean pas-
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and while travelling. Travel costs,
Tuition and registration fees at the
University of Vienna for two se-
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Travel through: Holland, Belgium,
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Sailing date: September 8, 1956.
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APPIUCATI N DEADLINE:
June 15, 1956
For free brochure explaining this
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THE INSTITUTE OF
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7325 South Maryland Avene
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name

Wolverine tennis 'star Barry
MacKay has been invited by U.S.
Davis Cup captain Billy Talbert
to play the tournament circuit in
England this June.
Talbert is inviting the least ex-
perienced men on the 12-man pre-
liminary Davis Cup team, of which
MacKay is a member, to travel to
England. They will play in several
tournaments highlighted by the
Wimbledon championships.
Gain Experience
MacKay told The Daily yester-
day that the purpose of the trip is
to give the young players "inter-
national experience and to help
develop the players." -
"It is a great opportunity," he
said, "and if I can work out all
the final arrangements I plan to
-
The 20-year-old junior is from
Akron, 0. and for the past two sea-
sons has been holding down the
number 'one position on the Michi-
gan team. This season he was
elected captain.
One of MacKay's biggest prob-
lems during his net career has been

his lack of consistency. Talbert is Those who impress Talbert most
hoping that by playing the tourna- on the tour could conceivably be
ments in England, the young star's in the running for a spot on the
game might settle down. final cup squad.
Major League Standings

SPORTS
Night Editor
ED SALEM

AMPRICAN

I

New York.........9
Chicago........... 5
Cleveland..........8
Washington ..... 8
Boston............ 6
Kansas City....... 5
Detroit. ........... 5
Baltimore..........5
YESTERDAY'S
Boston 5, Detroit 2

LEAGUE
L Pct.
5 .643
3 .625
5 .615
7 .533
6 .500
7 .417
8 .385
10 .333
SCORES

GB
11
112
3
31/
4%

W L
Milwaukee......... 5 3
St. Louis ...,....... 7 5
Brooklyn.........8 6
Cincinnati ........7 6
New York ..,...... 7 6
Pittsburgh.........7 7
Philadelphia ...... 5 7
Chicago...........3 9

Pct.
.625
.583
.572
.538
.538
.500
.417
.250

GB
1/
i
2
4

NATIONAL LEAGUE

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Regular 46.95
lightweight bicycles -38.95
ATTRACTIVE COLORS
REPAIRS and ACCESORIES for all Bicycles.
WHIZZER MOTOR SALES
Corner Main and Madison ... Phone NOrmandy 8-7187
"OPEN MONDAY NIGHT" till 9:00
Only 4 Blocks West of the Law Quad

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name

I

Kansas City 8, New York 7
Cleveland 7, Baltimore 1 (n)
Washington 7, Chicago 4 (n)

YESTERDAY'S SCORES
Pittsburgh 5, Cincinnati 1
Brooklyn 7, St. Louis 1 (n)
New York at Milwaukee, rain
Only games scheduled

address
city gone state
school

J

6

I I

* ~ ~mmfu~mum-irnuffh~w~i ~

I

Need
Mane
Desk
Crowded?
Sell your textbooks now
at FOLLETT'S while there
is stilt~a market for them.
Get extra cash and extra
room on your desk.
Take
Used
Books
to
Follett's

2
1
1
t
1
I
J
I
P

MICHIGAN A
Benedict, ss ... ... 5
Fox, p ........... 3
Clark, p.g ...,.,...,. 1
Ferrelli, p............
Girardin, p ..........1
Peterjohn, p .........*.0
Tommelein, if......4
Tippery, 2b............ 4
Boros, 3b............. 4
igman, rf............3
Thurston, rf..........1
Sealby, lb ..,.....3
Snider, c ,... .......4
Ronan, cf............ 4
Totals................37
NOTRE DAME AB
Carideo, ss............3
Hurley, 2b............5
Cusack, rf............ 3
Nespo, cf..............4
Kohorst, c.............5
Lesso, lb..............4
Jaeb, 3b ........... 4
Senecal, if............3
Bujnowski, p.......... 3
Totals ............... 34
MICHIGAN .... 000 320
Notre Dame .... 000 001

B
r
M
3

N E
0 0 0
1 1 0
o a o
0 0 0
0 800
0 0 0
1 2 0
2 2 0
1 2 1
0 0 0
0 1 0
0 1 0.
0 1 0
o 0 0
5 10 1
R H E
1 1 0
2 2 0j
1 1 0
0 1 0
0 2 0
0 1 0
0 0 1
1 1 0
1 2 0
6 11 1
000--5 10 1
302-6 11 1

AAU ]bars
'Pro Frogs'
Ex-AAU Official
Mocks Olympic Ban
STOCKTON, Calif. (M)-A form-
er AAU official Thursday entered
his jumping frog in the Annual
Frog Olympics at AngelsCamp,
May 17-20, in defiance of an AAU
ban on frog jumping as a non-'
recognized sport.
The entry was made by John S.
Coates Stockton business man and
former vice chairma nof the na-
tional AAU and member of the
American Olympic Committee. He
criticized AAU Secretary Daniel
J. Ferris for admonishing frog
jump officials to stop using the
word Olympics.
Trouble started last monthi when
Carl T. Mills, Olympic Frog Com-
missioner, with tongue in cheek
telegraphed Ferris asking him
what constitutes an amateur frog
and asking for recommendations
for setting Olympic style standards
of eligibility. Ferris replied coldly
that Mills was guilty of "viola-
tions of the terms of the U.S.
Olympic Charter."
Thursday Coates told Mills, "re-
serve for me my personal entry
in this traditional sport, honored
and made famous by Mark Twain's
jumping frog of Calaveras and
officially recognized by every gov-
ernor of California.

i

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ftais~tics
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