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May 03, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Y'AtE E

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1956

A

PAfiK SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILV THURSDAY, MAY 2, 195g

Junior Class
Elects New
Officers
(Continued from Page 1)
Sophomore class board members
of the engineering school are John
C. Fraser and Lawrence Howard.
Sophomore class officers are Jorge
C. Boehringer, president, Tom
Soeder, vice-president and Andrew
Bial, secretary-treasurer.
Junior class board members of
the engineering school are Don
Briggs, James E. King and Rick
Maslyn. Norman L. Hozak was
chosen president of the junior class
with Roger Fruck, vice-president
and Bruce Budde, secretary-treas-
urer.
Engineering senior class board
members are Glen Carlson, Brian
M. Moriarity, Donald Patterson,
Phillip Ardussi, John Moor and
Dick Souslin.
In the education school council,
Betsy Giourid and Judy Wolgast
will represent the junior class.
Senior members of the council in-
clude Sue Bocian, Fay Johnson,
Meredith Hardy, Bess Loye, Ro-
berta Evans, Reed Kenworthey,
Carol Miller, Katharine Mulloney,
Charlene Barnhill, and Robert
Geake.
Isabel Francis, '57Ed. will serve
as chairman of the evaluation
committee of the education school
and physical education representa-
tive is Lehna Farmie,. '57Ed.
Serving on the Student-Faculty
Committeq representatives in the
nursing school are Barbara Eyre
and Virginia Schnink. Publicity
and social committee representa-
tives are Clarice Wick and Gloria
Zille. Beverly Arnovity was chos-
en to serve on the library commit-
tee of the nursing school.

MAY FESTIVAL SERIES:
McCoy Suggests Wide Perspective

ond tenor, second alto and second
soprano.
Has Extensive Repertoire
As regards selection of works
to be performed, conductor Mc-
Coy says "You usually have to keep
in mind the chorus, although with
Choral Union we have never had
to worry about its limitations. It
has a most extensive repertoire,
one of the largest in the world for
a chorus of its kind.
"May Festival," McCoy states,
"has a high reputation and we
wouldn't want to choose choral
works which would endanger that
reputation. A particular type se-
lection, for example, while good
music in its field, would not be in
the same class as the music" per-
formed at the Festival.
On the other hand, "certain
standard numbers bear repetition,
and are performed every 10 years
or so." These works include such
major compositions as Verdi's
"Aida" or "Requiem."
Since "Choral Union has a one-
third membership turnover each
year, we can sometimes repeat
numbers that would otherwise be
'old stuff' to the chorus members.
"We also give consideration to
new works," McCoy says.
However, in respect to contem-
porary compositions, "the Schoen-
berg 'Gurre-Lieder' is probably the

most difficult the Choral Union has
attempted to date, and as has
usually been the case with con-
temporary pieces, when we first
start to rehearse, there are several
chorus members who are disin-
terested in the work." This is due
to the fact that "many persons
simply don't like contemporary
music.
"But as we have progressed with
rehearsals, enthusiasm for the
'Gurre-Lieder' has increased con-
siderably."
McCoy says "I have a decided
preference for choral music with
a sacred text because it deals with
high type ideas as against secular
texts which can become very mor-
bid.
Has No Favorite
"It would be almost impossible
for me to determine a particular
number which I like most as I
have several favorites in each
period of musical time."
McCoy, who has "no favorite
composer," wishes "that compos-
ers would write more things for
small choruses and instrumental
groups. I think," he says, "there
is a tendency among our composers
to produce large works."
Conductor Lester McCoy says,
"I also love Dixieland jazz, and
think it's fascinating music if it
is well done."

x

.44

"CHILDREN OF ATHENS"--French Instructor C.G. Christofidies won the Union photo contest with
this picture of children playing on the shore at Athens, Greece., The photo was taken with a Leica
M-3 Camera and Wide-angle lens.
UNUSUAL SUCCESS':
Winners of Photo Contest Announced

(.

More than 175 entries were sub-
mitted in the recently judged
Union-sponsored photo contest.
"It achieved unusual success,"
Gary Kane, '58, said yesterday,
pointing out that the photo display
in the Union was "an excellent
supplement" to last Saturday's
University Day.
At the same time, Kane announ-

CHORUS TRAINER-May Festival Choral Union chorus trainer
Lester McCoy likes music with sacred texts.

4

ced the seven winners of the con-
test.
First prize, a camera, went to
C. G. Christofides, an instructor in
the French department. The sub-
ject of his prize-winning photo
was "travel."
Second prize went to Bill Foxall,
'59E, and third place to Murray
Melbin, Grad.

Their boons were a photo-elec-
tric flash and a $30 gift certificate,
respectively.
Remaining four prizes were
awarded on a basis of the four
photo categories --sports, travel,
home town and campus.
Daily photographer Sam Ching,
'56, and Paul Gerastas, '57, won
prizes in these categories.
Christofidies, who has had some
of his werk published in The Daily,
and. Melbin also won prizes in the
final judging. The awards for the
last four winners will be either a
$5 gift certificate or a photo album.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)
Lieder," with soloists: Lois Marshall,
soprano; Martha Lipton, contralto; Har-
old Haugh and Rudolph Petrak, tenors;
Lawrence Winters, baritons; Erika Stied-
ry, narrator; Philadelphia Orchestra,
Thor Johnson, conductor.
Sunday, May 6, 8:30 p.m. Byron
Janis,. pianist; Philadelphia Orchestra,
Eugene Ormandy, conductor.
Information on tickets, etc., may be
procured at the offices of the University
Musicalt Society in Burton Memorial
Tower.
Placement Notices
SUMMER PLACEMENT
There will be a meeting of the Sum-
mer Placement Service in Room 3G,
Michigan Union, .Thurs., May 3, from
1 to 4:45 p.m. Types of jobs range from
Technical & Non Technical to Camps
& Resorts.
SUMMER PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Representatives from the following
will be here to interview for summer
jobs, Room 3G, Michigan Union, 1mto
4:45 p.m.
Thurs., May 3
Mr. Martin Gold, Bead Counselor,
Camp Farband, will interview male &
female Arts'& Crafts Counselor.
Mr. Rush Cattell, Camp Cherokee,
Steuben, Mich., will interview for male
Counselors.
Mrs. Barbara Lide, Field' Director,
Camp Cedar Lake, Waterloo Recreation
Area, Chelsea, Mich., will interview for
women Counselors.
Mr. Sam Marcus, Jewish Community
Center Day Camp, Detroit, will interview
for men Counselors.
Mr. Sknolnick, Fresh Aire Society, De-
troit, will interview for men Counselors.
Mr. Arnet Cole, Ann Arbor YMCA,
will interview for Counselors.
Miss Pearl Berlin CIO Children's
Camp, will interview for Counselors.
Miss Diane Richardson, Southern Oak-
land Girl Scouts, will interview for
Counselors.
Mrs. Wauters, Camp Hilltop, will in-
terview for men and women counselors.
Mr. Ralph Ellsworth, Ford Dealer in
Garden City, Mich., will interview for
Salesmen.
Mr.Terry Adderle, Russell Kelly Office
Service, will interview women for Typ-
ists, Stenographers, General Office
Clerks.
Mr. W. C. Wilson of Crowell-Collier
Publishing Co. in Detroit will inter-
view men for summer sales promotional
jobs in the Educational Division. (Not
selling magazines;)
A representative from the Gibson Re-
frigerator Co., will interview for Sales.
PERSONNEL REQUEST:
Merganthaler Linotype Co., Brooklyn,
New York, has openings for men with
B.A., B.S., or M.S. degrees in Physics,
Mech., Indust., Elect. E., BusAd., Acctg.,
and Liberal Arts in a training program
M0

in Manufacturing, Research, Sales, Ac-
ctg., and Industrial Engineering.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 371.
Representatives from the following
will be at the Bureau of Appointments:
Tuesday, May 8:
Ortho Pharmaceutical Co., Detroit
office-men in LS&A and BusAd for
Salesmen. Science background prefer-
able, but not essential.
Prudential Life Insurance Co., Minn.,
Wis., Mich., N. and S Dak. area-men
for Management Training Program in
the Minenapolis home office area, and
Chicago area.
Wednesday, May 9:
Ralph Ellsworth Inc., Garden City,
Mich.-men in any field for Sales.
Rand Corp., Santa Monica, Calif.-
men and women in Math., any degree
with training in Integral Calculus or
beyond.
Thurs., May 10:
Home Life Insurance Co., Detroit,
Mich.-men in LS&A or BusAd for
Sales and Sales Mgt.
For appointments contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
Ext. 371.
The following schools will have repre-
sentatives at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments to interview teachers for the
1956-57 school year.
Tuesday, May 8:
Albion, Mich. - Teacher needs: Ele-
mentary; Instrumental Music (Strings)
--Elementary and Secondary.
Ubly, Mich. - Teacher needs: Music
(Band); Industrial Arts (Junior &
Senior High).
Wednesday, May 9:
Kalamazoo, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary; Physical Ed. (Girls) -
Elem. and Junior High; Junior High
Pre-Language (Latin/French/German);
Senior High Physical Ed./Asst. in Foot-
ball; Swimming, Junior and Senior
High; Chemistry; Science/Biology/
Chemistry; Math/Science; Driver Ed.
Lawrence, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary-2nd Grade; 6th Grade-
man, asst. coach basketball and base-
ball or track; High School Social Stud-
ies/Head Basketball and Track or Base-
ball.
New Buffalo, Mich. - Teacher needs:
Elementary; Remedial Reading; Junior !
High/P E wonan; Commercial (Book-
keeping/Typing/Shorthand).
Thursday, May 10:
St. Joseph, Mich. -- Teacher needs:
Elementary-Kdg, and 2nd; Elementary
Art; Speech Correction; Mens Physical
Ed (5th, 6th, and 7th grades); 9th grade
English-man to -asst. Football; High
School English; High School Comm.
with. Shorthand.
Marion, Michigan-Teacher needs: In-j
strumental Music; Biology.
For additional information and ap-
pointments contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3528 Administration Build-
ing, NO 3-1511.

One-way Study Program
Starts For Chicago_'U'

A one-way exchange program of v
students has been started between
University of Chicago and Mos-I
cow University.
The program can only include
U.S.-to-Russia students because
American immigration laws pro-
hibit alien Communists from
studying in this country.
The one-year study program in
Moscow was arranged by the Chi-
cago Student Government. The
university authorities, although
not parties to the arrangement,
were said to have given their ap-
proval.
The cost, which will be covered
by the student government, was
estimated at $2,000, including
transportation and tuition.
The Human Rights Society at
Dartmouth (N.H.) has written
strongman Franco of Spain, call-
ing on him to correct "the recent
infringements on the rights of stu-
dents."
The societyexpressed concern
over the dictator's arrest of four
young intellectuals charged with
publishing and distributing illegal
literature.
It looks like the University of
Detroit has outdone us ... in one
respect anyway.
At their "Carnival," their grand
prize will be a Cadillac hardtop.
Michigan, at Michigras, gave away
no more than a suit and a dress.
* * * ,
The U. of Detroit also reports
that one of its student watchmen
was attacked and beaten by a
gang of youths.
Gustave Bartels, a Korean vet-
Petitioning Opent
Petitioning is still open for Wol-
verine chairmanships, according to
Mike Jacobson,
These chairmanships include the
Pep Rally, Publicity, Block 'M',
Special Affairs and Special Trips.
For information, call Jacobson
at NO 3-8508.

eran, could not identify the youths
but said they had been drinking.
MSU has its own problems with
too eager enforcement by the city
of traffic regulations.
The University of Michigan, of
course, has been sitting tight, won-
dering if bicycles will be banned
from the city side-walks. But at
Michigan State University, stu-
dents can be arrested for hitch-
hiking. A front-page picture in
the Michigan State News shows a
student-thumber being approached
from behind by an East Lansing
policeman,
But if you think the Spartans
have it bad, yo uhaven't heard'
anything yet,
At the Rochester Institute of
Technology in New York, the stu-
dent paper, RIT Reporter, notes
that students are liable to a $150
fine plus a 150 day jail sentence
for jay-walking.
A furor has been stirred up
among students when the Uni-
versity of Colorado regents came
out in favor of a proposal to al-
low all high school graduates seek-
ing admission to enter the univer-
sity.
Regent Kenneth Bundy explain-
ed, "I have been unable to explain
to taxpayers why certain Colo-
rado high school students cannot
enter the university on the same
basis as other students.
"There is too much thinking of
Plato's Republic going around to-
day in limiting college training to
a select few."
Another regent stated, "If we
are going to be a state university,
we should admit all high school
graduates wishing to attend col-
lege.
Replied the Colorado Daily stu-
dent paper in an editorial, "How
low can you get?"

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Following isr
the third in a, series of articles cov-
ering this year's May Festival.)
By RENE GNAM
"The music is the important
thing, and should anyone let his
ego become the most important
thing, the music will suffer."
So says Lester McCoy, conduc-
tor of University Choral Union;
for the annual "Messiah" per-
formances and Choral Union chor-
us trainer for the annual May
Festival concert series.
Conductor McCoy, adamant in
expressing an opinion, yet yield-
ing and open to suggestion on
controversial topics, has decided
views as to prejudices of con-
ductors with regard to the music
they perform in public.
"I am afraid that if a conductor
of a choral or instrumental group
would try to narrow his field down
to one, particular type music, or
even one particular composer, he
would be limiting his perspective,"
McCoy says.
Present Varied Program
If the conductor does not pre-
sent a varied programand exten-
sive repertoire for the audience,I
"he is limiting the field for listen-
ers as well as" for himself.
"You must vary your selections
so that over a period of time you
have given food to everyone."
This,- Conductor McCoy states,
is a principle employed by the
Choral Union.
"Here, we try to mix selections!
by noted composers and occasion-
ally add a large work such as this1
year's Schoenberg 'Gurre-Lieder'."
Hence, "we try to satisfy all types
of listeners,
"In choosing for an audience'
that has been essentially the same
type audience throughout the
years of May Festival, one doesn't
need to be governed by the limi-
tations of the audience's" recep-
tion of the music being presented.

"This particular audience," Mc-
Coy claims, "is very highly culti-
vated due to the large number of
concerts" given here and "the
number of top artists" who have
performed here.
Selections for the University
Choral Union concerts of the May
Festival series are chosen a year
in advance of the Festival.
Conductor McCoy says "Usually,
we make a tentative decision on
the numbers to be performed while
we're working on the present Fes-
tival. This gives us a basic idea
of what we're going to do.
"This fall, I will go to Cincin-
nati, and we (Maestro Thor John-
son, conductor of the Cincinnati
Symphony Orchestra and guest
conductor of the University Choral
Union at May Festival, and Choral
Union conductor McCoy) will
definitely decide the works to be
done."
McCoy generally makes a second
visit to Cincinnati, ". . . after 'The
Messiah' performances, and we
go over the score and possible in-
terpretation differences." At this
time, "we also prepare tentative
personnel placement.
Careful Planning Necessary
"This involves very careful
planning on the part of the two
persons concerned: the chorus
trainer and the conductor." As a
result of this, "there would be
relatively few changes" instituted
later on.
"We probably have one of the
most difficult choral seating ar-
rangements in the world," McCoy
says. "This is due to the space
between ends of the chorus.
"First voices are on the con-
ductor's left and seconds on his
right. This divides each section
except the basses." In this ar-
rangement, voices from left to
right, as the conductor views them,
are: first soprano, first alto, first
tenor, first bass, second bass, see-

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