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April 29, 1956 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-29
Note:
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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN fDAILY

mnc#nv Anr;l 79 19SF

Sunday, April 29, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Graduate Artists

CONTENTS
ANN ARBOR AT NIGHT-Impressionistic snatches of a quiet
city. Page 2
GRADUATE ARTISTS-The first exhibit of its kind; over 120
pieces of work. Page 2
CONSERVATIVES vs. LIBERALS-An attempt toward definition
of terms that have become perhaps as corrupted as politics.
itself. Page 3
SIX CLASSIC CAMPUS DATES-A candid report on the Univer-
sity social situation. Pages 4 and 5
CAMPUS ARCHITECTURE-In defense of the diversity of styles
and an explanation of the policy behind the diversity. Pages
6 and 7
NATHANAEL WEST-Discussion of a "minor" literary genius.
Page 8
OOSTERBAAN OUT OF SEASON-Profile of a football coach off
the field. Page 9
IN SEARCH OF VICE-A "townie" bar-a world away from the
students. Page 10'
SUPPLEMENT EDITOR-Debra Durchslag
SUPPLEMENT.PHOTOGRAPHER-John Hirtzel
SUPPLEMENT ARTIST-David Rohs

THE STRUGGLE
FOR A DEFINITION

The Right Time ft

(Continued from Page 3)
IN AN ATTEMPT to summarize
the differences in the disputes
between liberalism and conserva-
tism, to describe them so that they
relate to both contemporary and
historical problems, we might at-
tempt a definition along these
lines:
Liberalism is a belief in the
legitimacy of human wants as
the primary concern of organiz-
ed society, perhaps the only con-
cern.
Liberalism is usually associated
with a desire for change in the
direction of greater fulfillment of
those wants.
WHILE few writers explicity state
T the liberal point of view, as de-
fined "above, the criteria listed
would seem to divide best those
we calliconservatives and those
we call liberals.
The Pragmatist philosopher,
William James came close to
enunciating the pure liberal view
when he wrote: "Take any de-
mand, however, slight, which any
creature, however weak, may
make. Ought it not, for its own
sake, to be satisfied?--If not, prove
why not. The only possible rea-
son there can be why any pheno-
menon ought to exist is that such
a phenomenon is actually desired."
The ethic James derived from
this reasoning was similar to that
of Utilitarian . Jeremy Bentham
who held that the end of society
was the greatest happiness for the
greatest number, a maximization
of the fulfillment of human wants.
JOHN ADAMS reflected the crux
of conservative dispute with
liberals when he said of their prec-
ious human wants: "That the first
wants of every man is his dinner
and the second want his girl were
truths well known .. . long before
the great philosopher Malthus

-Daiy--JO n Hlrtzel

A First Showing
From left to right, Jim Anthony, Jim Eldridge, and Bob Kiley are shown with a few of the paintings
which will be shown in the first graduate art studentsi exhibition, to be held May 6 through May 27
In the Museum of Art. The show will include approximately 60 paintings and 60 prints as well as
Several pieces of sculpture and will represent the work of seven graduate artists. The majority of the
Work shown will be current pieces, many of them done in the last two or three months.

arose to think he enlightened the
world by his discovery."
But conservativism can attack
from more than one side, disput-
ing the liberal ethic at any or all
points-maintaining that human
wants themselves are vain, mean-
ingless or secondary, that they
are purely personal and none of
society's business, that society can
do nothing to promote thir ful-
fillment.
Such definitions make liberalism
a consistent philosophy and con-
servativism consistent only in that
it disputes liberalism. This does
not require, however, that conser-
vativism be negative in outlook.
Rather it means that conservati-
vism has enjoyed a flexibility of
direction as well as of degree; it
can give primacy to infinite num-
bers of demands above the sole
ethic of fulfilling human wants.
Justice, morality, culture, priva-
cy, revealation, "due process of
law," duty, "rugged individual-
ism," discipline, "liberal educa-
tion," are a few of the ideals to
which the true liberal subscribes
only insofar as they represent hu-
man wants but which more than
one modern conservative has ad-
vanced as a legitimate check on
human desires.
THE DIVERSITY of possible
conservative objections to the
rising liberal ethic keeps conser-
vativism alive in every generation,
and as one roadblock is shattered
another soon appears.
The debate is still relevant to
the social, economic, political, and
legal issues of our day. As long
as human wants are considered by
some to be of primary concern, as
long as others finfd no inherent
validity in anything so transitory
or find need to rationalize their
own status at society's expense,
there will be no resolution of this
most important and enduring con-
flict in our history.
Vhites
anding,
evest!

poetic grotesque.

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(Continued from Page 8)
LEMUEL PITKIN, the hero of
A Cool Million leaves his little
Vermont0village to seek his for-
tune in the big city. He is com-
pletely trusting and idealistic and
should, according to the rules of
Horatio Alger stories become a
great success. But the world pro-
ceeds to gobble him up rather than
raise him up. A benevolent prison
warden has all Lemuel's teeth re-
moved as a potential "source of
infection." He loses an eye while
altruistically stopping some run-
away horses. His left thumb is lost
in an engagement with some Com-

munists. He loses a leg in a bear
trap and is scalped by Indians
while thus incommoded. Finally
he is shot through the heart and
is posthumously proclaimed the
"American-Boy," the first martyr
of a coon-skin hatted American
fascist political party.
TODAY West's writing doesn't
seem so out of tune. The world
has since been trained to recog-
nize the value of a religious point
of view and years of college ex-
ercises on metaphysical poets have
trained up special critical facul-
ties to a point where we can recog-
nize and appreciate a touch of the
poetic grotesque.

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ANN ARBOR AT NIGHT
Ann Arbor at night ... when solitude finds survival.
The Diag, deserted and silent ...until the swelling breeze rustles
posters against the trees.
Angell Hall, empty and still ... the empty corridors echo from
the janitor's footsteps . . . its dark form punctured only by an
occasional lighted room. On the front steps, a match flares as a lone
sitting figure lights his pipe.
South Quad's lights gradually blink off ... the remaining square.
lighted windows forming a haphazard pattern.
Laughter and giggles float to the street from a lighted room on
Martha Cook's top floor. The spasmodic clacking of a typewriter
answers from the Law Quad.
Inside the courtyard, the faint strains of progressive jazz fade as a
hi-fi is snapped off ... the medieval surroundings become deathly
quiet.
A lone bike sinds before the Chem building. Faint hammering
noises emerge from under a manhole cover in the front lawn as a
workman moves in the heating tunnel.
Traffic lights blink nervously with no cars to stop ... the streets
are empty except for a stray cat-sauntering across State Street, toying
with a skittering piece of paper caught by the breeze. He scurries
under a parked car as a cab cruises towards the Union.
Two empty coke bottles sit on the Union's steps, overlooking the
few scattered bicycles. Suddenly the doors burst open and several
students emerge, laughing and joking. They unlock their bikes and
tide away ... the street is restored to silence.

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