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April 28, 1956 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-28

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THE MCSIGAN DAILY

.

SATURDAY, AP'M "..Inf

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY. AI' ~IL 23. 1936

._, .__ _- ... ,..., s.,.,..

..

ONE OF FEW DEVOTEES:
'U' Publications Designed by Lenox

(Editor's Note: This is the first
of two articles describing art de-
signers at the University.)
By TED FRIEDMAN
George Lenox is production
manager and art director at the
University Press.
He is responsible for the make-
up, cover design and general ap-
appearance of University Press
publications.
"Five years ago we had no one
doing designing work at the Uni-
versity," he said.
Now, he pointed out, there is a
small group of people devoted en-
tirely to designing work.
Designing' Aids 'U'
Designing can not only aid the
University's public relations, he
went on, but act as a unifying'
force within the organization.
"See, I did the announcement
covers this year," he said, picking
up a literary college announce-
ment.-
He showed how he had designed
the announcements "all along one
pattern.
"That way you don't subordi-
nate the University to a depart-
nment."
Lenox indicated that he had
strong feelings about his work.
"You have to go out and show1
that we're progressing in our pub-
lications." ' This is what designing
does, he said.
No Shouting1
But he was quick to point out1
that this does not mean "shout-
ing" at people.
"Designers are always shouting
at people about what they should

Danger Seen
In Surveys
A group of political scientists at
a University conference has indi-
cated that there is a danger that
political decision-making may be
taken out of the hands of respon-
sible party leaders and turned over
by survey technicians.
In a new University publication
based on a political science depart-.
ment conference last year, 20 ex-
perts from throughout the nation
gave their views on "The Role of
Public Opinion Polls in the Study
of Political Parties."
The experts noted that the polls
are becoming increasingly import-
ant on the national scene, but
that unless the data is correctly
evaluated, serious consequences to
American party machinery may
develop.
However, the political scientists
generally agreed that, responsible
analysis of the survey data would
result in a more favorable rein-
vigoration of the political parties.
The booklet was compiled by
John P. White of the political
science department.

NYU Survey Checks Opinions
Of College Newspaper Editiors

The opinions of college news-
paper editors on leading problems
and questions were reflected in a
New York University journalism
department nationwide poll.
Participating the survey were 47
editors selected from every section
of the country representing both
large and small institutions.
Fifty-five per cent of the editors
said that President Dwight D.
Eisenhower should be re-elected
to a second term. Adlai E. Steven-
son was. preferred by 26% while
support for other leading candi-
dates was divided.
"Peace and prosperity" was pick-
ed as the leading issue of the
coming campaign, while the ma-
jority felt that President Eisen-
hower's health wouldn't play a big
part in the election.
A very slight majority thought
that United States policy toward
Israel is inadequate. However,
others said that the "politicians
are sacrificing American interests"
for the sake of the Jewish vote.
Twenty-six editors maintained
that not even organized resistance

r

could stop school de-segregation in
the South, while 18 others saw
no end of segregation in sight.
One southern student wrote, "In-
telligent people in all states see
that segregation is impractical as
well as unfair. They will win over
the diehards . . . within several
years."
The campus editors reported a
general lack of interest by students
in politics. Many though that
education in this respect has failed
to provide a well balanced view of
life.
College fraternities were given a,
votet of confidence as 28 contended
that their benefits outweigh any
disadvantages. Fourteen expressed
opposition to fraternities on the
basis that they are detrimental to
the democratic spirit.
Those favoring fraternization as-
serted that the right to select
one's friends is a fundamental
democratic prerogative, while sev-
eral others claimed, "Any organi-
zation based on exclusiveness
rather than universality is
incomparable with democracy."

4.

-Daily-Jim Owens
XRESGE MEDICAL LIBRARY . .. aith, fact and fakery
esg Lbrary I splays
meriean Indian Med1 jines

7

-Daily-Dick Gaskill

GEORGE LENOX
... "Don't shout at people.">

By SUSAN KARTUS
'aith, fact and fakery are the
rds that most aptly describe the
sent exhibit at the Kresge
dical Library.
Vedicine among the American
bans is the theme of the dis-
y. The exhibit is divided into
ee categories, herbal medicine,
cotics, and the medicine man.
Cwo of the most prominent it-
s include a huge mask .which
s hung on a stick to scare away
evil spirits while the medicine
n - performed his rituals, and
'o Leave U'
or Europe
'rofessors Marguerite Hood and
ns David of the University
pool of Music have been selected
grants to participate in the In-
national Educational Exchange
>gram of the United States Gov-
iment, established under the
bright Act.
3oth will leave this fall for
dies in Europe during the aca-
nic year 1956-57.
?rof. Hood will establish head-
irters at the Music Academy in
nich, Geritany. She plans to
dy music education in German
ools and institutions for teach-
educaition.
rof. David will be affiliated
h the University of Florence.
project is a study'/ of Italian
Lmber music of the Sixteenth

the only trephined skull - ever to
be found in Michigan. The red
men believed that cutting holes
in the skull would relive the pres-
sure of hemorrhage or fracture.
'Professional Pride
"The medicine man was sincere
and took a real pride in his pro-
fession, truly believing in his me-
thods of. healing," John R. Du-
bois, '56, who is responsible for
accumulating the exhibit, said.
Also on display are fossil bones
which the Indians ingested to
treat broken bones. Because of
the high amount of calcium in
fossils, it might have helped.
Cherokee Writings
Our knowledge concerning In-
dian Medicine comes from the
writings of the Cherokee Indians,
the only Indians in North Ameri-
ca to have an alphabet. A book
in the exhibit displays the great
similarity between the Indians and
the white, man's alphabet.
From the red man our fore-
fathers gained the knowledge of
many uses of drugs, which have
been passed down to the present
generation as a valuable heritage.
Positions Open
Petitioning is continuing for
positions on the Cinema Guild
Board, Human Relations Board,
Housing Study Committee, and
Calendar Study Committee of the.
Student Government Council.
Petitions may be picked up in
1020 Administration Building.

have.
"I don't

think advertising

hasI

DAC Plans
Jazz Session
For Sunday
Dramatic Arts Center will spon-
sor a Jazz Workshop at 3 p.m.
Sunday at the Masonic Temple.
The purpose of the workshop is
to talk about modern jazz as well
as play it, according to Mike
Wahls, one of the initiators of the
program.
"It's a continuation of the type
of thing that they did a lot of here
.in the late 40's," he said. "It's in
response to people who like jazz
and want to know more about it.
We hope we can dispel some of the
misconceptions that have arisen
about it, and we also hope that it
will result in a higher level of jazz
consciousness."
Performers will be by West, sax-
ophone; Don Young, '57, trombone;
Andy White, Grad., SM, bass; Jack
Tyson, drums and Wahls, piano.
Admission is $1.10.

s
R
1
1
7
i
t

to be that way." He spoke sourly
about his experience working
for commercial advertising firms
where you have "the type of prod-
uct where you're shouting 'New!'
when you've been shouting 'New!'
for the last ten years.
"Take automobile designs for
example-the emphasis on styling.
"Someone said automobiles look
like a juke box turned on its side."
Work Has Meaning
He contrasted this to his work
at the University. "It has more
meaning," he said.
"We don't shout."
Although he disclaimed having
any philosophy about his work, he
said "I like simple statements. I
try to design each problem in it-
self and I don't like to set up rules.
As Fred Wieck (University Press
Director) says, 'Rules are for when
the brains give out.'"
Accident Starts Career
Lenox is a University graduate.
It was almost by accident that he
went into designing.
"I 'originally enrolled in lit
school with ideas of taking up
journalism. But my roommate
was an architect." It was pri-
marily this roommate who spurred
on his interest in designing.
Now he lives in Ann Arbor with
his wife and two small children.

He spends his free time engaged
in his favorite hobby-painting.
Also, he said, "I like sports. I'm
the mediocre kind, I guess. Horse-
shoes on a vacant lot."
Car Markets
Are Inuenced
By Teenagers
Junior's demand for the keys to
the family car exerts a powerful
influence on the new and used car
market, according to a re-
cent University survey.
'Data developed by the Survey
Research Center show that fami-
lies with teenagers were more
than twice as likely to buy a new
or used model as families with no
children.
Car consciousness among the
pre-driving set may also be a po-
tent force in the auto salesman's
favor.

Come

to Church

4

Sunday

Organization
Notices

DAILY, OFFICIAL BULLETIN I

,r

THE Daily Official Bulletin is an
fficial publication of the University
Michigan fr which the Michigan
ally assumes no ,editorial responsi-
lity. Notices should be sent in
YPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
.ministration Building before 2 p.m.
e day preceding publication. Notices
r the Sunday edition must be in by
,p.m. Friday.

SATUJRDAY, APRIL 28, 1956
VOL. LXVIII, NO. 57

General

Notices

All veterans who expect education
and allowance under Public Law 550
(Korea G.I. Bill) must get instructors'
signatures for the month of April and
turn Dean's Monthly Certification into
the Dean's office before 5:00 p.m. May 3.
The 50th Annual French Play. For
this jubilee Le Cercle Francais presents
"Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme" a comedy-
ballet in 5 acts by Moliere Wed., May 2
at 7:30 p.m. in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre. Bov Office Tues., May 1, from
2-7 p.m., and Wed., May 2, 10 a.m. to
7:30 p.m. Members of the Cercle Fran-
cas will be admitted free of charge
by returning their membership cards.
Academic Notices
Aeronautical Engineering High Alti-
-r y
..... o i -.. , -

tude Seminar. L. M. Jones of the Upper
Atmosphere Research Group will speak
on "Instrumentation and Results of
Michigan Rocket Methods, III" on Mon.,
April 30, at 4:00 p.m., in Room 1504,
East Eng. Bldg.
Doctoral Exmaination for William Lee
Berry, Chemistry; thesis: "Exploratory
Snytheses in the Benzosuberanone and
Benzazepinone Series, with Emphasis on
Diazo Oxides," Sat., April 28, 3003 Chem-
istry Bldg., at 9:00 a.m. Chairman, P. A.
S. Smith.
Doctoral Examination for William Ar-
thus Bradley, Civil Engineering; thesis:
"The Determination of Moments and
Deflections in Plates by the Moire
Method and by Finite Differences with
Application to the Square Clamped
Plate with Square Cutouts," Mon., April
30, 307 West Engineering Bldg., at 1:00
p.m. Chairman, B. G. Johnston.
Doctoral Examination for Robert
William Buggert, Musicology; thesis:
"Alberto da Ripa, Lutenist and Com-
poser," Mon., April 30, East Council
Room, Rackham Bldg., at 4:00 p.m.
Chairman, L. E. Cuyler.
Events Today
The Misanthrope, by Moliere, will be
presented by the Department of Speech
at 8 p.m. today in the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.

Placement Notices
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Harper Hospital, Detroit, Mich., has
vacancies for secretarial and clerical
workers.
State of Washington announces exams
for Consulting Microbiologist.. Requires
at least five years of professional ex-
perience.
Baird Associates, Inc., Cambridge;
Mass., has an opening for a man with
a B.S. in Physics or in Psysical Chem.
to work in the Engrg. Dept.
Moore Business Forms, Inc., Niagara,
Falls, N.Y., is interested in a graduate
chemist, either PhD or M.S., with -a
good background in Organic and Physi-
cal Chem. '
U.S. Civil S'ervice announces oppor-
tunities for Agricultural Research
Scientists in Agronomy, Animal Hus-
bandry and Physiology, Bacteriology,
Botany, Dairy Husbandry, Entomology,
Fiber Technology, Fishery Products
Tech. and Research Biology, Food Pro-
ducts Tech., Forest Prod. Tech., Genet-
ic8, Horticulture, Home Ec., Nematol-
ogy, Parasitology, Plant Path., Plant
Physiology, Range Conservation, Soil
Science, Research Forestry, Systematic
Zoology, Wildlife Research Biology,
levels GS-7 to GS-14.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 371.

Prof. Smith,-
Heads Bureau
Research is the line of Prof.
Frank P. Smith.
As director of the Business Re-
search Bureau, he confronts such
problems as what the people think
of a certain magazine, what they
are buying or the parking problem
in Detroit.
It is Prof Smith's job to select
the research projects that indus-
tries and businesses bring the bu-
reau. The projects are chosen on
the basis of these criteria.
Whether the material will be of
assistance in the business field,
and if it will provide case material
for class room use.
The bureau provides a way by
which faculty members and grad-
uate students can barticipate in
reasearch.
Prof. Smith says that they only
handle six or eight sizeable pro-
Sject&a year, each taking anywhere
from one to five years.
The bureau handles every aspect
of business administration except
industrial relations. To determine
what the people buy, 60,000 ques-
tionnaires were distributed in Oak-
land County.
Prof. Smith has held his present
position for four years. He is also
editor of the Accounting Review.

Episcopal Student Foundation: Can-
terbury General Meeting, April 29, 5:45
p.m., Canterbury House.
Buffet Supper; Speaker; Nominations
for President, 6:00 p.m., April 29, Can-
terbury House.
* s *
Hillel Foundation: Petitions for Ad-
minstrative Council Chairmanships
must be turned in April 30.
Saturday morning Sabbath service,
9:00 a.m., Hillel. -
Sunday evening Supper Club, 6:00
p.m., Hillel.
* . *
Michigan Christian Fellowship: Dr.
Luchies, Wheaton College, will speak on
"The Disadvantages of Being a Chris-
tian, April 29, 4:00 p.m., Lane Hall.
* * *
Student Government Council: The
Calendaring Committee is receiving re-
quests for the calendaring of campus
events for the school year 1956-57 to
be sponsored by student organizations.
Requests must be submitted on or be-
fore April 30 to the Calendaring Com-
mittee, Mrs. Ruth Callahan, 1020 Ad-
ministration Bldg.
* s*
Student Religious Association: Folk
Dancing at Lane Hall, April 30, 7:30-
10:00 p.m., in the recreation room. A
special program of Italian Dances will
be featured and members of Circolo
Italiano are cordially invited.
* * *
Undergraduate Mathematics Club:
Professor Samuelson will speak on May
1, 7:30 p.m. 3210 Angell Hall.
* * *
Unitarian Student Group: Professor
Kenneth Leisenring will speak on "Al-
bert Schweitzers Ethics," April 29, 7:30
p.m., 1917 Washtenaw. Rides will leave
from Lane Hall, Stockwell, and Martha
Cook Bldg. at 7:15 p.m.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets,
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 AM., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. -11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-L7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00 to 1;30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M..
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M. Friends Meeting,
10:45 A.M. Sunday School.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdaht,
William B. Hutchinson, Eugene A. Ransom
Ministers..
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship, "Commission to
Upset," Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 AM. Two discussion groups- Problems of
Christian Belief, and Paul's Faith and World
Religions.
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program. Student Panel
on Science and Religion.
7:30 P.M. Fireside Forum.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, Open Daily.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8 o'clock Holy Communion at St. Andrew's Church.
(Breakfast at the Canterbury House follow-
ing the 9 o'clock.)

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN
(Disciples of Christ),

CHURCH

i

Hill and Tappan Streets.
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: TODAY'S REV-
OLUTION AND THE CHURCH.
9:45 A.M., Church School.f
THE CONGREGATIONAL and, DISCIPLES STU.
DENT GUILD-7:00 P.M., Memorial Christian
Church. Mr, Chester Taylor of the NAACP,
Speaker.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday from 1:00 to 4:00: Spring Clean-Up Day
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon on "The Assurance of Divine
Love." (Holy Communion in the 10:45 Ser-
vice )
Sunday at 6:00 Gamma Delta, LutheranStudent
Club, Supper and Program. Election of Officers
for next school year
Friday at 6:00: Married Students Supper and
Evening
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service.
7.00 Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Andrew Missiras
April 29, Palm Sunday:
10:30 A.M. Holy Week Services-April 29 to
May 5.
Sunday, Monday & Tuesday-Vespers, 7:30nP.M.
,Wednesday, May 2-Sacramenlt of Holy Unction,
7:30 P.M.
Thursday, May 3-Divine Liturgy, 7 A.M.
Reading of 12 Gospels, 7:30 P.M.
Good Friday, May 4:
Holy Hours 9:30 A.M. Solemn P-ocession of Tomb,
7:30 P.M.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED

A-

11 o'clock Morning prayer and sermon.
5:45 Buffet Supper.
6:45 Speaker, Mr. Frank Copley, "The
Prophets."

{E
#.

Pagan

-

i

r

-

CHRISTAIN

Carrying the most complete
Hi-Fi Component Inventory
ever offered in the area.
Electro-Voice too''David Bogen
Allec-Lansing Fisher
And all the rest.
Ask about our installment
.1Ai/ . - I

SCIENCE
HEALS

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Chester H. Loucks and Duane L. Day, Min-
isters. Student Advisor: Beth Mahone.
9:45 The Student Class will continue its discus-
sion by emphasizing what Jesus had to say
about his "Second Coming."
11:00 Sermon: "Useful." Reverend Day.
6:45 Dr. Leroy Waterman will spepk on "The
Earliest Anonymous Gospel."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister.
9:00 A.M. Services at Saline Valley Farms Youth
Hostel, for Eastern Mid-West Conference of
Liberal Religious Youth. Rev. Edward H. Red-
man, preacher.
10:00 A.M. Unitarian Adult group.
11:00 A.M. Services of Worship. Rev. Edward H.
Redman preaching% on: "Great Moments in
Liberal Religious History.
LbrlRlgossoy"7:00 P.M. Unitarian Student Group with Mr.
Kenneth Leisenring speaking on: "Schweitzer."
Monday, April 30th-8:00 P.M.
Church Party: Theme-"T-V Take-offs."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Win. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday: Church Services at 9:15 A.M. and 11:00
A.M. Fraternity Bible Study at Trigon, 9:00
A.M. Seminar at 11:00 A.M, "Christianity
and World Tensions," led by Dr. Lionel Laing
of the Political Science Department. Supper
at 5:30 P.M. 6:45 P.M.--Dr. Henry Walch
of Plymouth will speak on "Why Did It Hap-
pen to Me?"
Monday: "Coffee Break" from 3:30-5:30 P.M. at
Pat Pickett's apartment, 217 S. Observatory.

-NW

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9& 11:00A.M. WorshipServices
10:00 A.M. Bible Study
5:45 P.M. Supper--Program Following
at 7:00. Paul Hasvold, Speaker, "Con-
temporary Philosophies."
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10 o'clock Sunday School.
11:00 "A Consecrated Home," Pastor Bennett.
6.00 Student Guild.
7:00 "Has The Gospel Message Changed?" Pas.
tor Bennett.
Wednesday 7:30 Prayer Meeting.
We Welcome You.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Junior Church and Church School at 10:45 A.M...
Public Worship at 10:45 A.M. Dr. Parr will preach
on "THE MAN WHO NEVER WAS"
Student Guild at Memorial Christian Church at
7:00 P.M. Speaker will be Chester Taylor,
President of the Campus N.A.A.C.P.

423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Morse Saito, Student Director
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon:
Christian Heritage of Joy," Rev. Press.

*The

t

_.j

You are invited to attend a FREE LECTURE entitled:
"CHRISTIAN SCIENC,:
THE HEAJIJNG POWER. OF
TRUE CONSCIOUSNESS"
by
PAUL STARK SEELEY of Portland, Oregon
Member of the Board of Lectureship
of the Mother Church of Christ, Scientist
in Boston, Massachusetts

That was a wonderful
game. And you know the
prize? That delicious
CHUCK STEAK SPECIAL

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue

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