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April 26, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE T ~E.

THE MCHIGA DAIL

1 AAorldm

p,

Netters Face
Netmen Seek 22nd in Row;
Oppose. Wayne Tomorrow

Detroit

To day

in

oH m

Opener

By ED SALEML
The University of Detroit ten-
nis team has never beaten Michi-
gan, and Wayne has turned the
tables only once.
The Wolverines will try to add
to these streaks, as well as their
21 straight dual - match record,
when they meet Detroit at home
today and face Wayne tomorrow
on the Tartars' home courts.
Today's match with Detroit will
begin at 2:15 p.m. on the Varsity
courts. It will be the Wolverines'
first taste of competition since
their Southern trip at the begin-
ning of April.
Although they have been hamp-
ered by poor weather, and ,have
not gotten in as much practice as
Coach Bill Murphy would have
liked, the Wolverines will be fav-
ored in each of these matches.
Detroit, which lost to Michigan
State last Tuesday, 7-2, is led: by
two veterans, Earl Clark and
Sandy Kaplan, number one and
two men respectively. These two
led Detroit to a 7-2 victory over
Bowling Green in the opening
match of the season.
Detroit Coach Chet Murphy,
brother of Michigan's coach, is
fairly optimistic about his team's
chances in the Missouri Valley
tournament.,
Those expected to see action,
along with Clark and Kaplan, in-
clude Dick Wing and Ken Borolo,
two lettermen, and newcomer
Jerry Walke.
For Wayne ; Coach Fred Mul-
hauser, this appears to be a year

of rebuilding, with only two let-
termen returning from last year's
fine team that won 11 and lost
but five.
Charles and Larry Soloman are
the only two letter-winners return-
ing; however, Don Brown, and Bob
Lowrie have had junior varsity ex-
' perience and should help.
Brown played in the Michigan
match last year and recorded the
Tartars' lone victory in their 8-1
loss to the Wolverines.
Poor weather has also cut into
Wayne's practice schedule but to
make matters worse, the team did
not take a Southern road trip this
year.
The Tartars have not beaten
Michigan since 1946, while the
Wolverines have won six matches
in their abbreviated series.
fMichigan will have one more
tune-up match next week before
opening its Big Ten schedule. The
Wolverines play Western Michigan
here next Wednesday and then
host Wisconsin the following week-
end.
Badminton
Champ
Geert Keilstrup beat Dick
Brown in two straight sets, 15-
4, 15-4, yesterday afternoon at.
the: I-M Building to retain the
all-campus badminton singles
championship.

BARRY MACKAY, number one singles player, will lead the
Wolverine netmen today in their home opener with the Univer-
sity of Detroit.

r-

Rain HampersI-M Action

By DON McGHEE
Intramural softball action was
greatly hindered yesterday by rain.
Only three of the 12 scheduled
tilts were played long enough to
go on the record as completed
games. Six games were postponed,
one was forfeited and two were
called in the top of the third.
Rain was falling when the games
began, and never let up for an in-
stant. Had it not been for the fact
that some games of other weeks
had already been canceled and
that the playoffs are soon to be
held, the games would have un-
doubtedly been rescheduled.,

NATS SURPRISE BOSOX:
Yanks Pad Lead, Trip Orioles, 4-2

BALTIMORE ()-A wild throw
by shortstop Willie Miranda on a
double-play ball opened the gates
for two New York runs in the'
seventh inning, and the Yankees
went on to defeat the Baltimore
Oriples, 4-2, last night.
Gil McDougald homered for the
league leaders, who won their sev-
enth game in eight starts behind
the six-hit pitching of Whitey
Ford,
' 4 *
Nats 4, Bosox 1
BOSTON () - Pedro Ramos,
mixing a sweeping curve with his
fastball, doused the sputtering
Red Sox with a fine three-hitter
k HoA League
Standings
"MRICAN LEAGUE

yesterday as he pitched the Wash-
ington Nationals to a 4-1 victory
over Boston.
An old Boston nemesis in Fen-
way .Park-Roy Sievers-tagged
his first . home run of the cam-
paign and scored on a wild pitch
after walking. But it was Ramos,
possessing little more than speed
last year, who showed the way.
Pesky Pedro racked up eight
strikeouts. The performance spell-
ed the fourth straight loss for the
Sox, who opened the campaign
with three straight triumphs.
fJackie Jensen hit his first hom-
er of the year in the sixth.
Indians 5, A's 2
KANSAS CITY (P)-Herb Score.
squelched a ninth inning Kansas
City rally last night, pitching
Cleveland to a 5-2 victory over
the Athletics.
The fireballing lefthander struck
out eight, walked four and limited
the A's to five hits in winning his
first game of the season. Score lost
his only other start-a 2-hit job
against the Chicago White Sox.
Rookie Rocky Colavito, Al Rosen
and Vic Wertz eased Score's way
with home runs.
* * *
' Dodgers 7, Giants 2
NEW YORK (M) - Gil Hodges
slammed a home run, double and
single, Jackie Robinson stole home
and Carl Erskine pitched a seven-
hitter as the Brooklyn Dodgers

thrashed the New York Giants,
7-2, last night to break a first-
place tie with the Milwaukee
Braves and go out in front by a
half-game.
* * *
Cards 6, Cubs 0
ST. LOUIS ()A'-Harvey "The
Kitten" Haddix, little lefthander
of the St. Louis Cardinals, regain-
ed his form last night with a two-
hit shutout of the Chicago Cubs,
6-0, and became the first Cardi-
nal pitcher this season to pitch a
complete game.
* , ,
Bucs 6, Phils 5
PHILADELPHIA (AP)-Outfielder
Frank Thomas greeted Philadel-
phia relief pitcher Jack Meyer
with a seventh-inning single that
drove in the run which gave the
Pittsburgh Pirates a 6-5 victory
last night in Connie Mack Sta-
dium.

In the games that did go the
required three innings, Phi Sigma
Delta whipped Theta Xi, 9-3. Phi
Sig pitcher Warren Singer allowed,
two hits., one a three-run homer by
Theta Xi's pitcher, Tom Chamber-
lain. The win, mainly a team ef-
fort, made it three straight for
Phi Sig.
Sigma Nu. in a game featuring
many walks, trounced Kappa Sig-
ma, 12-6, though collecting only
one more hit than the Kappa Sigs.
Pi Lambda Phi routed Phi Epsi-
lon Pi, 12-7, in a game highlighted
by a grand slam homer by Pilam
pitcher Ed Lubin.
Games between Phi Sigma Kap-
pa and Sigma Alpha Mu and be-
tween Alpha Tau Omega and Phi
Kappa Sigma were halted before
going the necessary three innings.
Delta Sigma Phi forfeited its
game with Alpha Sigma Phi.
Frosh Gymnast
Eyes Olympics
Freshman Jim Hayslett and
Michigan Coach Newt Loken will
leave this morning for the United
States Olympic gymnastics team
tryouts this weekend at University
Park, Pa.
Hayslett, who is from Indian-
apolis, Ind., will be competing
against the United States' best
competitors in the parallel bars.
Loken has been chosen to help
judge the trials on the Penn State
campus.
Sophomore Ed Gagnier will not
compete; since, if he is chosen for
the Olympics, it would have to be
as a representative of his home
country, Canada.

Baseballers
Still Await
RealTests
By JIM BAAD
With the Big Ten opening day
Just around the corner, a look
back to what Michigan's baseball
team has accomplished thus far
is pertinent.
The Wolverines will face Indiana
at Ferry Field tomorrow with six
straight victories behind them.
Add to this a 5-3 record on the
Southern trip and that makes 11
wins in 14 starts.
This is impressive, but Coach
Ray Fisher does not feel as opti-
mistic as the record shows.
For one thing, Michigan has not
been playing the competition
which it will face in the Big Ten,
Only against Western Michigan
I did Fisher feel that his team was
getting the feel of average Con-
ference pitching.
Coach Bemoans Hitting
"And we only got our usual five
or six hits off them," commented
Fisher in summing up his team's
hitting. "We hit two or three in a
row to get our runs, but that's all."
In expressing this, Fisher is ex-
pressing Michigan's hitting so far
this season. Averaging about seven
hits per game, not high considering
the generally inferior grade of
pitching faced, the Wolverines
have been staging "big" innings,
collecting most of their runs in
one- or two-frame splurges.
Another problem which Fisher
faces is pitching. He is unsure of
what he has. Don Poloskey and Bill
Thurston are figured to be two
rather reliable starters, although
Thurston was a bit wild in the
Western Michigan game.
Fisher stated at the beginning
of the season that he was looking
for another starter who would be
fairly dependable. When he came
back from the South, he was still
looking. Since. then he has ex-
perimented with the rest of his
staff.
Clark's Injury Painful
Jim Clark was coming along
nicely until he strained his should-
er a week ago. He has not been
able to throw hard this week and
Fisher feels It will be a while
longer before he gets the full use
of his arm again.
Fisher has also tried outfielder
Bruce Fox on the mound, and Fox
looked quite impressive, holding
Wayne to one hit. "Fox is not
terribly fast," said Fisher, "but
mnany of his pitches come in around
the knees, and he never gets flust-
ered out there, either. I think he'll
do me some good as a pitcher this
year."
Fisher is wary of predicting his
team's chances, as a coach usually
is, but six straight victories look
pretty good.

By BRUCE BENNETT

Quarterbacks Jim Van Pelt and
Bob Ptacek unlimbered their
throwing arms yesterday and foot-
ball Coach Bennie Oosterbaan
liked what he saw.
Working in a steady downpour,
both players succeded in finding
the range on several shots, with
ends Dave Bowers and Walt John-
son and halfback Mike Shatusky
their primary targets.
Long Ones Click
Especially pleasing to Ooster-
baan was that his passers were hit-
ting- on long throws, as well as
short passes over the middle. Ex-

Aerial Attack Cicks in Grid Practice

cept for a few games last year,
the Wolverines did not have much
success with long passes.
With Jim Pace out of action
and Terry Barr unable to scrim-
mage because of a recent knee
operation, veterans John Green-
wood, Dave Rentschler and sopho-
more Tom Zachary saw consider-
able action at left halfback.
This situation will enable Oost-

running since the drills were de-
voted mainly to passing. Herrn-
stein, who missed Saturday's
scrimmage due to an ankle in-
jury, showed no ill effects from
it in carrying out his blocking
assignments.
Offensive Work Satisfactory
Oosterbaan expressed approval
with Herrnstein's work on offense
so far, but withheld further com-

Just look around campus.' You'll see that -the
"custom" details of this Arrow University shirt
are definitely "college correct." The box pleat
the soft-roll button-down collar, and the back
button are basic requirements. In 9 solid colors,
this is the oxford shirt for you. Wear it. with
comfortable Arrow Bermuda shorts. They're
poplin, and ayailable in 6 colors. Shirts, $5.00.
Tie, $2.50.Shorts, $5.00.

From !!g angle ONO
it says "Cleemans"

erbaan to get an idea of the team's ment until he has a chance to
depth for next fall at the key tail- watch him perform on defense.
back position. Defensive drills have not been
Steadily-improving John Herrn- stressed yet and Herrnstein must
stein alternated with Jim Byers be able to fill a line-backer post
at fullback, but \neither did any to win the job.

S T O R E HOQU R S D A I LY 9 T O 5:3 0
features
ARROW SPORTSWEAR

S T A T E

S T R E E ,T

A T

C. t B R T Y

r -------------------------------------- aaa

A Campus-to'-Career Case History

New York
Chicago
Washington
Kansas City
Boston
Detroit
Cleveland
Baltimore

W'
7
4
4
3
3
3
2

L
1
1
5
4
4
4
4
6

Pet.
.875
.800
.444
.429
.429
.429
.429
.250
GAMES

GB
.'.2
1%
3%
3%
3%
3%
35
5

I

YESTERDAY'S

tops in spring wear

New York 4, Baltimore 2
Washington 4, Boston 1
Cleveland 5, Kansas City 2
Chicago and Detroit not sched-
uled
GAMES TODAY
New York at Baltimore -
Byrne (1-0) vs. Wilson 1-0).
Washington at Boston-Bro-
,dowski (0-1) vs. Brewer (1-0).
Cleveland at Kansas City -
Wynn (1-0) vs. Kretlow (0-0).
NATIONAL LEAGUE

___ _.

I

Brooklyn
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Chicago
Philadelphia
New York
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati

W L
5 2
4 2
5 3
3 3
3 4
3 4
3 4
1 5

Pet.
.712
.667
.635
.500
.429
.429
.429,
.167
GAMES

GB
'%
1%
2
2
2
3%

I

YESTERDAY'S

Brooklyn 7, New York 2
Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 5
St. Louis 6, Chicago 0
Cincinnati at Milwaukee-post-
k paned, rain.
GAMES TODAY
Brooklyn at New York (N) -
Craig (1-0) vs. Worthington
(0-1) or Antonelli (1-1).
Only game scheduled.

IVY LEAGUE
COTTON CORD
SUIT
$as .9
CODSUITS
$3495

MANHATTAN
and
CATALINA
SPORTS WEAR
T-SHIRTS.
SPORT SHIRTS

1
t:
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Dick Walsh (right) discussing carrier equipment which will provide
many additional long distance circuits out of Philadelphia.

"There's opportunity - a growing company"

Y

I

I

Illinois College of
OPTOMETRY
announces that applica-
tions for admissions to its
classes beginning Sept. 10,
1956 are nowbeing received.
3-year professional course.
Leading to Doc tor of
Optometry Degree.- I

As an Engineer in the Transmission
Section of Bell Telephone Company of
Pennsylvania, Richard M. Walsh plans
for the future.
"Our group's responsibility," says
Dick, "is to see that we have sufficient
facilities to handle present and future
needs. Telephone usage is growing every
year, and we keep up with this growth
by keeping ahead of. it.
"For instance, to meet the increasing
demand for communication circuits in
our area, we're adding 70,000 new chan-
nel miles this year alone,- at a cost of
$3,500,000.' Laying new cable will give
us 40,000 of those channel miles, and
-7-1 netfL-~+t l n n n 1- n

number of long distance calls on each
pair of wires simultaneously.
"Thus, though a cable might have only
300 pairs of wires, we can, with carrier,
make it carry over 3000 telephone calls
at one time. Using carrier equipment to
get extra circuits out of cable-which is
expensive to make and lay-is an example
of how we engineer to give high-grade
service at the lowest possible cost.
"Before I graduated from college I had
interviews with twenty-eight companies.
Out of all these I chose the telephone
company because it had the most to offer
in the way of interesting work, training
and opportunity. This certainly turned
r~tt ~ ri n 4 rr ic ia e

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