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April 17, 1956 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 1958

i

NOT REPRESENTATIVE:
Gallup Sampling Techniques Criticized

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IIIflS6'

By TED FRIEDMAN
Two of the top experts in the
field of survey research have spok-
en out against the poll-taking
techniques of George Gallup.
Gallup Polls, often thought to
play an important role in na-
tional politics, are carried in syn-
dicated column in more than 100
newspapers.
Prof. Angus Campbell, director
of the University's Survey Research
Center, and Prof. Leslie Kish, head
of the Center's sampling section,
both agreed that Gallup Polls are
unscientific and inaccurate.
"I regard George Gallup as a
part of journalism rather than
science," Prof. Campbell said.
"I would not label him a fake,
but I disagree with him."
However, Prof. Campbell sug-

gested that accuracy might :Dot
be essential for Gallup's type poll.
"I don't think it's worthwhile to
do a scientific survey for a news-
paper study."
"Some of his methods could be
improved upon," he said.
"He's clearly not as accurate
as he could be."
Taking an even stronger posi-
tion than Prof. Campbell, Prof.
Kish said Gallup Polls are not
sufficiently accurate for their pur-
poses.
He called the polls biased, in
other words the polls do not give
a truly representative cross-sec-
tion of opinion.
He explained that "the inter-
viewer goes into a neighborhood
and picks out a certain number of
people." He may be told to ques-

tion a specified number of upper-
class and lower-class people.
"But essentially, this is an im-
possible thing for the interviewer
to do: You don't know what class
a person is in."
Gallup's method, he went on,
requires that the interviewer be
completely impartial in choosing
his subjects.
"It has been shown that this
cannot be done due to the fact
that certain types of people are
easier to find than others."
He contrasted Gallup's quota
sampling technique with the new-
er probability sampling techniques.
In probability sampling, he said,
"The final process of selection is
done by a mechanical chance pro-
cedure. Selection is not ,left to
the discretion of the interviewer.

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Coming
Thursday

DIAL NO 2-2513

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Pair glasses in red straw case,
Phone NO 2-2591, Porter. )162A
PERSONAL
ONCE AGAIN Newberry and Gomberg
present their spectacular "Showboat."
Talent, music, and variety in this
year's Michigras at -the Field House
on April 20th and 21st. )137F
SPRING FEVER Exposed! - in "Cam-
pus Love" at Michigras. )144F
GRACE-Life is well worth it! Only '$4
-1 yr.; $7-2 yrs. (that's 8c a copy)
to University personnel. Student Per-
iodical, NO 2-3061. )145F
SURVEYING STUDENTS: Please de-
scribe middle blouse. )143F
DEAR 4 surveying students: Meet me
at H2SO4 Vat in Chem. Bldg.-Coed
in white middle blouse. )142F
BACHELOR (age 24) with small inheri-
tance, seeking suitable mate. Send
picture with letter. Box 2282, Ann Ar-
bor. )133F
HOW TO SELL YOUR MANUSCRIPTS
New, copyrighted, 4000 word booklet
gives expert advice. Only 40c. Box
143, Flatbush P.O. Station, Bklyn. 26,
New York. )132F
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted tuxedos converted to
single-breasted, $18, or new silk shawl
collar, $25. Write to Michaels Tailor-
ing Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit, Michi-
gan, for free details or phone
WOodward 3-5776. )118F
FOR RENT
5-ROOM furnished apartment. For
adults. June 15-Sept. 15. Call after
6 p.m. NO 2-8361. )55C
FAIRLY NEW basement suite for 2 or
3 men students, school year 1956-57,
graduate students or responsible un-
dergraduate students. Semi-private
entrance, private bath. Available also
for summer school. NO 2-3618, 1615
Morton. ) 54C
ROOMS FOR RENT
DOUBLE sleeping -rooms for two men.
Phone NO 8-0565 or NO 3-0913. )38D
ROOM. Single Graduate Student, 716
N. 5th Ave. NO 3-6957. )39D

USED CARS
1949 LINCOLN COSMOPOLITAN, radio,
heater, seat covers. Excellent shape.
Must sell. $275.'NO 3-6400. )149N
1951 CHEVROLET 4-door, original own-
er. Resaonable. NO 2-1388. )147N
TERRIFIC '53 Dodge, one owner, 4-door
Gyromatic, Radio & Heater. Call NO
3-8140 after 6 P.M. )146N
1952 PLYMOUTH 4 door sedan, heater,
seat covers, excellent condition. NO
2-9853 evenings only. )138N
OUR LOW
OVERHEAD
saves you money!
50 new and used cars to choose from.
Come out today to the BIG NEW lot
at 3345 Washtenaw.
Fitzgerald
LINCOLN - MERCURY
Phone NO 3-4197
Open evenings till 8
1941 FORD Club coupe, good tires, no
rust, runs perfectly. $95.
1952 CHEVROLET 2-door, grey, real
clean and low mileage, $445.
1953 WILLYS hardtop, 2-tone paint, ra-
dio, heater, overdrive, 20,000 miles,
white-wall tires and like new, $745.
1950 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, radio,
heater, in excellent condition, $445.
Jim White Chevrolet, Inc.
Ashley at Liberty, First at Washington
Phone NO 2-5000 or NO 3-6495
1130N
i
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
MAKE MONEY SPARE TIME
7 to 10 hrs: weekly nets to $200.00 month.
Possibly full time work. Man or wom-
an from this 'area to service new De
Lux Vending Mach. Route. One who
can qualify as to honesty and ability
will be interviewed locally. Car and
$600.00 cash investment necessary, ful-
ly secured. Write P.O. box 7047, Min-
neapolis 11, Minn. )19S
WANTED TO RENT
SINGLE COED desires room, preferably
near campus, preferably for remAinder
of semester. Call NO 3-8130. )19L
FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS
MUNICIPAL GOLF COURSE now open
for playing. 1519 Fuller Road. )7M
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - Theses, term papers, etc.
Reasonable rates, prompt service. 830
South Main, NO 8-7590. )44J
RICHARD MADDY - VIOLINMAKER.
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )31J
New Atlas Tires
6,70X15, $15.95; 6.00x16, $13.95; 760x15,
$19.95 (exchange price plus tax)
Hickey's Service Station
Cor. N. Main & Catherine. NO 8-7717
)42J
SMITH'S FLOOR COVERINGS
205 N. Main 207 E. Washington
Headquarters in Ann Arbor for:
Armstrong linoleum and tile
NO 3-8321 NO 2-9418
Complete floor coverings shops
Mohawk and Bigelow carpets
Guaranteed installation or
"do-it-yourself."
)36J
HELP WANTED
YOUNG LADY for full time work at
soda fountain. No evenings or Sun-
days. Swift's Drug Store. 340 S. State,
NO 2-0534. )105H
JUNE GRADUATE-Young woman with
recreational interests and skills to
work full time as a recreational work-
er at Methodist 'hildren's Village,
Detroit. Start about June 13. Mr.
DeNuth. KEnwood 1-4060 (Detroit)
between 9-5 on weekdays. )104H
MALE replacement wanted for meal job
at Sigma Delta Tau. Hours 12-1, 6-7.
Phone NO 8-8844. )1038
STUDENT ORGANIZATION is interest-
ed in finding a non-student woman
with business procedure to work aft-
ernoons from 3 to 5, and Sat. morn-
ings 9 to 12. Phone NO 2-5514 between
5 and 6 P.M. only. Ask for Fred Shel-
don. )988
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part tlm*.
Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann A -bor Yellow
and Checker Cab Company. Phone
NO 8-9382. )70H
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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ARMY; NAVY
39c, shorts
Sam's Store,

type oxfords-$6.88, sox
69c, military supplies.
122 E. Washington.
)123B

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When Thorwald Dockstader-sophomore, epicure, and sports-
man-first took up smoking, he did not simply choose the first
brand of cigarettes that came to hand. No, indeed! He did what
any sophomore, epicure, and sportsman would do: he sampled
several brands and then picked the gentlest, tastiest, most
thumpingly,. wondrously, unfailingly pleasing of all - Philip
Morris, of corris!
Similarly, when Thorwald Dockstader took up girls, he did
not simply select the first one who came along. No, indeed!
Thorwald sampled. He took out several likely girls and-then he
compared their charms and then he made his choice.
His first date was with an English lit major named Elizabeth
Barrett Grish, a wisp of a girl with luminous eyes and a soul
that shimmered with a pale, unearthly beauty. Trippingly,
trippingly, she walked with Thorwald upon the beach and sat
with him behind a windward dune and listened to a sea shell
and sighed sweetly and took out a little gold pencil and a little
morocco notebook and wrote a little poem:
I-will lie upon the shore,
I will be a dreamer.
I will feel tie sea once more
Pounding on my femur.
ihorwald's second date was with a physical ed major named
Peaches Glendower, a broth of a girl with a ready smile and a
size 18 neck. She took Thorwald down to the cinder track where
theyjogged around thirty or forty times to open up the pores.

1I

MR. E. C. BARNES*
Former DETROIT HAIR STYLIST
is now with us!
TUESDAY - SATURDAY

DIAL NO 2-3136
ENDING WEDNESDAY
"TWO HOURS OF FINE ENJOY-
MENT !" WELL-NIGH SUPERB.!"
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
RODGERS& HAMERSTENS
~Y
cocoa by 1ELuxe
rrg
IN STEREOPHONIC SOUND
NEXT
SUSAN HAYWARD in
"I'LL CRY TOMORROW"

4,

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Evening Appointments Available
Specializing in hair styling, shaping, and permanent waving.

4A

RUTH'S BEAUTY SHOP
Main Floor Location
215 S. FIFTH AVE. - PHONE NO 8-7249

1,

1)

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15TH

L

HILL
AUDITORIUM

MAY 3-4-5m6
Philadelphia Orchestra at All Concerts

ANN ARBOR
MICHIGAN

/
'I.:

Then they played four games of squash, six sets of tennis, 36
holes of golf, nine innings of one-o-cat, four periods of rugger,
six chukkers of lacrosse, and a mile and a quarter of leap frog.
Then they worked out for a few hours on the parallel bars, the
flying rings, and the bongo board, and then went ten rounds
with the eight-ounce gloves. Then they had heaping bowls of
bran and whey, exchanged a manly handshake, and went home
to their respective whirlpool baths.
Thorwald's final date was with a golden-haired, creamy-browed,
green-eyed, red-lipped, full-calved girl named Totsi McEstway.
Totsi was not majoring in anything. As she often said; "Gee
whillikers, what's college for anyhow - to fill your head full of
morbid old facts, or to discover the shining essence that is
YOU?"
Totsi started the evening with Thorwald at a lu'xurious res-
taurant where she consumed her own weight in Cornish rock
hen. From there they went to a de luxe movie palace where Totsi
had popcorn with butter and a bag of chocolate covered raisins
-also with butter. Then they went to a costly ballroom and
cha-cha'd till dawn, tipping the band wildly all the while. Then
they went to a Chinese restaurant where Totsi, unable to deci-
pher the large and baffling menu, solved her problem by order-
ing one of everything. Then Thorwald took her to the women's
dorm, boosted her in the window, and went downtown to wait
for the Morris Plan office to open.
While waiting, Thorwald thought over all of his girls and
came to a decision. "It is clear," said Thorwald, "that I am not

Thursday, May 3, 8:30 P.M.
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
INGE BORKH, Soprano
Concerto for Orchestra ........Handel-Ormandy
Symphony No. 7 in C major.. ...........Sibelius
"V'a doro pupille" from Julius Caesar .....Handel
"Abscheulicher wo eilst du hin?" from Fidelo
Beethoven
INGE BORKH
Monologue from Elektra . ........R. Strauss
MISS BORKH
Variations on a Theme of Pagan in. . .,.Blacher
Friday, May 4, 8:30 P.M.
THOR JOHNSON, Guest Conductor
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
LOIS MARSHALL, Soprano
JANE HOBSON, Mezzo-Soprano
RUDOLF PETRAK, Tenor
VRONSKY and BASIN, Pianists
Overture to the Marriage of Figaro ......Mozart
"Davidde penitente," K. 469 .. .... ... . Mozart
CHORAL UNION AND SOLOISTS
The oratorio, DAVIDDE PENITENTE, was written by
Mozart for one of the Lenten concerts of the Society
of Musicians in Vienna during the 1785 season. It
is based largely on his great C minor Mass begun in
1783, and utilized the Kyrie and Gloria section with
two interpolated arias. The work is particularly ap-
propriate this year-the bicentennial of Mozart's
birth year.
Concerto in F major, K. 242............Mozart
VRONSKY AND BABIN
Saturday, May 5 2:30 P.M.
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
HILDE GUEDEN, Soprano
FESTIVAL YOUTH CHORUS
MARGUERITE HOOD, Conductor
Overture to The Magic Flute............Mozart
"L'amnero saro costante" from I re Pastore . Mozart

Saturday, May 5, 8:30 P.M.
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
ZINO FRANCESCATTI, Violinist
Overture to Oberon... ............... .Weber
Symphony No. 1 in C major ... " " " ,s.Bizet
Allegro vivo
Adagio
Allegro vivace
Allegro vivace
Concerto in D major, Op. 77, for
Violin and Orchestra ..............Brahms
ZINO FRANCESCATTI
Sunday, May. 6, 2:30 P.M..
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
LOIS MARSHALL, Soprano
MARTHA LIPTON, Contralto
RUDOLF PETRAK, Tenor
HAROLD HAUGH, Tenor
LAWRENCE WINTERS, Baritone
ERIKA von WAGNER STIEDRY, Narrator
"GURRE-LIEDER (a Cantata) Arnold Schoenberg
CHORAL UNION AND SOLOISTS
GURRE-LIEDER, a cantata on poems by Jen Peter
Jacobsen, was Schoenberg's first significant work.
It was begun in 1900 and completely orchestrated
ten years later. Written before the composer's depar-
ture from defined tonal centers, it is in a style di-
rectly descendent from Wagner and Mahler. It em-
ploys five solo voices, narrator, three male choruses,
and a mixed chorus, as well as a complex instru-
mentation.
Sunday, May 6, 8:30 P.M.

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