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April 13, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E MICHIGAN DAILY

FAMDAY

THE MICHIGAN PAILY FRIDAY,

- --- --- I -- ---

By BILL HANEY
Tag Day officials were confident
r. last night this year's contributions
for the Fresh Air Camp would
"exceed by far the $2,800 collected
last year."
Over 1,000 faculty members,
students, and townspeople will
man buckets located throughout

of

S-uccess

Cummings Receives Award

Prof. Emeritus Howard H. Cum-
mings, of the University's post
graduate medical program, was
presented with the Distinguished
Medical Citizenship Award at the
Northern Tri-State Medical Assn.
convention here yesterday.
Prof. John M. Sheldon, director
of post-graduate medicine, in con-
ferring the award cited Prof. Cum-
ming's work as an obstretician
and an educator.
Earlier at the convention a pan-
el on medical education indicated
that more schooling may be re-
quired in the future for medical
degrees.
Dr. A. C. Furstenerg, Dean of

the Medical Sdhool, suggested that
the future medical student may
be attending school for a full year
for four years straight.
In the main speech at the con-
vention Dr. John S. Detar of Mi-
lan, Mich., called for a reempha-
sis on the importance of the gen-
eral practitioner.
He asserted that the ordinary
family doctor is capable of hand-
ling ninety percent of his cases
without consulting a specialist.
He added that hospitals would
do well to rely more on such
doctors instead of feeling that only
specialists are needed.

,4

St

campus and city areas again today.
If collections are up to expecta-
tions over 250 underprivileged boys
will be sent to the University Fresh
Air Camp next summer.
Some of the boys come from in-
stitutional placement or foster
homes. Many of the youngsters
are the products of broken homes.
Though some boys have records
as juvenile delinquents, many are
sent to the camp simply for an
opportunity to get away from
pressures and strains of an un-
healthy home environment.
Sometimes the cases are more
severe and the boys have already
developed symptoms deeply rooted
of maladjustment.
Most of the counsellors at the
camp are University students. In
fact, the Fresh Air Camp was es-
tablished by the University as a
summer workshop for seniors and
graduate students in education,
psychology, sociology and related
fields.
The University students woi~k
along with the social agencies of
southeastern Michigan who spon-
sor the boys.
Since the real purpose of the
camp is to help the youngsters,
the counsellors pay special atten-
tion to the individual's response
to participation in group situa-
tions.

-Daily-vein Soden.
UP A LAZY RIVER-Lake Patterson and six adjoining lakes
near University Fresh Air Camp provide excellent opportunities
for water sports. Fishing and swimming are two sports taught
the boys by University students acting as counsellors.

Organization Notices
Congregational and- Disciple Guild: Inter-Arts Union: plays, scores, bal-
Slide Might, tonight, 8:00 p.m., Guild lets and poetry for consideration of per-
House, 524 Thompson. Bring your fav- formance in the Student Arts Festival
arite slides. omnenthStdnArsFsva
: . , this May are now being accepted. Man-
Hillel Foundation: Hillel Dramatic uscripts should be turned in to the
group presents a one-act play, "Pastor Generation Office in the Publicationo
Knoll,", Ar is8:30p.m.,MainBldg. Friday, April 20, is the deadline.
Chapel. Free admission.
Friday evening Sabbath; Dinner, 6:00 * * *
pim., Rosh Hodesh Iyar followed by Newman Club: "The Black Cat Ball"
Sabbath Services. An address, "Reli- will be presented tonight, 8:00-12:00
gion and Social Science" will be given p.m., Newman Club Center. There will
by Assistant Professor Gerhard E. Len- be an orchestra and refreshments will
ski at 7:30 p.m., Hillel. be served.
Israeli Independence Dance and * rv.
Celebration, April 14, 8:00 p.m., Hillel. SRA: Coffee Hour, Lane Hall Library,
Saturday morning Sabbath Services, 4:30-6:00 p.m., open to all students.
9:00 a.m., Hillel. * * *
Student Zionist Organization will Westminister Student Fellowship-
sponsor Israeli folk dancing, April 15, Grad Luncheon, April 14, 12:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., Hillel. Presbyterian Student Center.*
WATCH FOR OUR
Spring housecleaning sale ad
in Tomorrow's Michigan Daily

The seven week program at the
summer camp is not arranged to
administer complete thei'apy.
Rather it is an integral part of a
year-round program to remove
the causes of the boys' difficulties.
However, officials do not lose
sight of the fact the boys are
coming to the camp as a vacation

and not with the idea they are
undergoing therapy.
So the camp on Lake Patterson,
24 miles northwest of Ann Arbor,
features all the camping activities
that can be crowded into seven
weeks: swimming, arts and crafts,
overnights, cookouts and baseball
and other sports.

areau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
idg., Ext. 371.RedJL( ls i
Doily 8:00 A.M, to 6:00 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.
MARY'S A TOvATIC CAR ASH
142 EAST HOOVER

LIGHTWEIGHT BICYCLES
$41.95 and Up
REPAIRS ON ALL MAKES OF BICYCLES
WHIZZER MOTOR SALES
Corner Main and Madison ... Phone NOrmandy 8-7187
"OPEN MONDAY NIGHT" till 9:00
Only 4 Blocks West of the Law Quad

SA

E

2 DAYS ONLY -SATURDAY AND MONDAY
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. Univ. Ph. NO 8-6972
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"

2
}

-I I

i

r .

4What's

doing ... at

da7

Pratt & Whitney
Aircraft
Professors practice what
they preach ... and vice versa
Following a practice of twenty years, Pratt & Whitney
Aircraft will again welcome a group of college pro-
fessors as members of the engineering staff during the
coming summer months.
Last year our "summer professors" represented col-
leges from coast to coast. They tackled important projects
in such diverse fields as instrumentation and vibration,
combustion, compressible flow, and materials develop-
ment. Despite the limited time available to these men,
they made significant contributions to our overall effort.
Though it was to be expected that both the com-
pany and the participating professors might benefit di-
rectly from such a program, the sphere of influence
has been much broader. The many students who are
taught by these professors during the college year are
sharing the ultimate benefits ... profiting from lectures
that are sparked by the kind of practical experience
that can be gained with a recognized industry leader
like Pratt & Whitney Aircraft.

*

ik

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yh

,

Cr ..
wr,..
.--

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{ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Several "summer profs" voluntarily spent
part of their time conducting refresher
courses for P & W A's young engineers.

One assignment involved a comprehensive survey
of equipment for the expansion of high-altitude
test facilities in Willgoos Laboratory, the world's
most complete, privately owned jet engine lab.

Technical contributions were varied.
Worthwhile assistance was given in vibra-
tion and instrumentation studies.

.

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