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March 30, 1956 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 34, 1956

TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1956

'NEGRO CULTURE' THEME:
'U' Organizes New Summer Program

By ADELAIDE WILEY
The University summer program,
"Patterns of American Culture:
Contributions of the Negro," has
been set up, and includes several
important lectures.
According to Prof. R. C. Boys,
of the English department, and
chairman of the summer program
committee, Dr. Ralph J. Bunche
of the United Nations "says he
will come to take part if he doesn't
have to go to Geneva."
Two teachers, Ira Reed, of the
sociology department at Haver-
ford College in Pennsylvania, and
Prof. Benjamin Quarles, of Mor-
gan State University's history de-
partment in Maryland, have been
lined up.
E. Frederic Morrow, business ad-
visor to the executive staff of the
White House, will speak on some
aspect of the current political
scene.
Rep.: Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
of New Y'rk City, will lecture on
"The American Political Scene"
during the summer.
Poet Langston Hughes plans to
read from his poems and to com-
ment on them in relation to Negro
life.
Publisher To Talk
Publisher of the Pittsburgh
Courier, "The largest Negro Week-
ly newspaper in the world," W.
Beverly Carter, Jr., will talk about
Negro newspapers and magazines.
Lorenzo Turner, a linguist from
Roosevelt University, Chicago, will
discuss the language and folklore
of Negro speech in the Carolina
and Georgia coastal islands.
"The Economic Position of the
Negro since the 1930 Depression"
is to be the topic of a lecture by,
Abram L. Harris, economist from
the University of Chicago
Art To Be Included
Hale A. Woodruff, of the New
York University art department,
is helping to arrange an art exhibit
and will give a gallery talk on it.
Dean of the medical school at
Howard University, Robert S. Ja-
son, will speak on "Medical Edu-
cation and the Public Welfare."
From the Nuclear Development
Corporation of America, J. Ernest
Museum Head
Give Award
Prof. Jean Paul Slusser, Director
of the Museum of Art, was re-
cently awarded a bronze medal
"for his great development of the
arts in the State of Michigan."
The award was made by the Fine
Arts Section of the Michigan Aca-
demy of Science, Arts and Letters
at a luncheon in the League. The
award is given each year to the
person credited with best promot-
ing of art in Michigan.

Wilkins, Jr. is coming to speak
on the role of atomic energy in
underdeveloped countries.
Singer Dorothy Maynor will be
at the University to sing Negro
spirituals.
Painters To Exhibit
More activities planned by Prof.
Boys and his committee include
an exhibition of paintings by dis-
tinguished Negro painters in Alum-
ni Memorial Hall.
In the Clements Library there
will be two exhibitions: "Anti-
Slavery Origins: the Stirrings of
American Conscience" and "Negro
Contributions to American Cul-
ture."
"The American Negro in the
Arts" will be an exhibition in the
General Library.
WUOM will put on a series of
broadcasts, "American Idiom,"
which includes "major works by

contemporary classical and jazz
composers, interspersed with read-
ings of poetry by Negro wroters."
Historian To Talk
A jazz concert will be announced
later.
John Hope Franklin, historian
from Howard University will speak
on the history of the assimilation
of the Negro.
Televised interviews with the
speakers" will be carried by the
University television station.
Prof. Boys and his committee,
which consists of Prof. Kenneth
N. Stewart of the journalism de-
partment, Prof. Frank Grace of
the political science department,
and Prof. N. Edd Miller of the
speech department and assistant
director of the summer session,
have been lining up speakers and
other parts of the program since
last January.

Second Semester
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE AWTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
June 1 to June 12, 1956
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June
11 or 12 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to the scheduling committee.
Evening Schedule for Degree Candidates

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PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE
i~s~ -excp iic.1

Regular Mon.
Exam June 11
Time 9-12 A.M.
Mon.
Special June 4
Pd '7-10 P.M.
Each student should

Mon. Tues.
June 11 June 12
2-5 P.M. 9-12 A.M.
"Tues. Wed.
June 5 June 6
7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M.
receive notification from

Tues.
June 12
2-5 P.M.
Thurs.
June 7
7-10 P.M.
his instruc-

tor as to the time and place of his examination.

4

MON

Time of Class
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(at
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DAY (at'
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REGULAR SCHEDULE
Time of Examination
8 Friday, June 1
9 Monday, June 4
10 Tuesday, June 5
11 Saturday, June 2
12 Friday, June 8
1 Friday, June 8
2 Wednesday, June 6
3 Friday, June 8

CO MPLETE
w~ cowme

TUESDAY

(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3

Saturday, June 2
Tuesday, June 5
Friday, June 1
Monday, June 4
Thursday, June 7
Thursday, June 7
Wednesday, June 6.

,

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

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There are more than a mil-n in emore than any
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1116 South University
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"

Botany 2, 122
Bus. Ad. 11
Bus. Ad. 12
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 8, 20, 182, 183
Economics 71
Economics 72
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 102, 153
English 1, 2 Group A
English 1, 2 Group B*
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32, 61, 62
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32
Naval Science 102, 202, 302, 402
Political Science 2
Psychology 31
Psychology 271
Russian 2
Sociology 1 Group A, 60
Sociology 1 Group B y
Spanish 1. 2, 22, 31, 32

Thursday, June 7
Friday, June 8
Wednesday, June6
Wednesday, June6
Friday, June 8
Wednesday, June6
Thursday, June 7
Wednesday, June6
Friday, June 8
Tuesday, June 12
Tuesday, June 12
Saturday, June 9
Monday, June 11
Saturday, June 9
Wednesday, JuneE
Monday, June 11
Saturday, June 9
Monday, June 11
Monday, June 11

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
6 2-5
6 9-12
2-5
6 2-5
2-5
6 2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
19-12
6 9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5

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A Campus-to-Career Case History

Ch.-
C.E.
C.E.
C.E.
Drat
Drat
Irat
E.E.
E.M
E.M
Eng
M.-
M.-
Nay
Phy

*This Group B exam. Is open only to students having a
*conflict with the period assigned to Group A.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEEUING
-Met. 1 Monday, June 11 2-5
2 Saturday, June 9 9-12
70 Monday, June 11 9-12
181 Monday, June 11 2-5
w. 1, 3 Tuesday, June 12 215
w. 2 Monday, June 11 9-12
w, 2x Saturday, June 9 9-12.
5 Saturday, June 9 9-12
., I Tuesday, June 12 9-12
.2 Monday, June 11 9-12
lish 10, 11 Monday, June 11 9-12
. 135 Wednesday, June 6 9-12
I. 136 Tuesday, June 12 2-5
al Science 102; 202, 302e 402 Saturday, June 9 2-5
sics 53 Friday, June 1 2-5

-f

4

P.E. 31, 32, 131 Saturday, Jane 8 U-12
SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the Con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All eases of confietsi be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 W.E. between
April 20 and May 4 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit
of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulle-
tin board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSIlyG
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board

4

Winfield Giguere, here tuning the coils of an IF strip on an experimental
FM receiver that uses.-the new high-frequency transistor.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and' the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
Good Friday 12:00 until 3:00. 7:30 P.M. "Way
of the cross."
Saturday 4:00 P.M. Ministration of Holy Baptism.
Easter Sunday Services 7, 9, and 11 A.M. Holy
Communion.
5 P.M. Family servtce.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sunday, 11 A.M.
Wednesday, 8 P.M., Testimony Meeting.
Sunday School, 9:30 A.M.
Reading Room, 339 South Main.
Tuesday to Saturday, 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Monday,
11 A.M. to 9 P.M.; Sunday, 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M. Friends Meeting.
.10:45 A.M. Sunday School.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
Today; 12-1 Good Friday Service.
Sunday--
6:30 A.M. Easter Sunrise Service,
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. "He Showed Himself Alone."
7:00 P.M. "Recall of the Risen Christ."
Wednesday: 7:30 Prayer Meeting.
WE EXTEND A CORDIAL WELCOME TO EACH
OF YOU.

*

"Our business is new ideas, new developments"

Winfield J. Giguere, or Giggs as he is
known, graduated in 1954 from the Uni-
versity of New Hampshire with a B.S.
in Electrical Engineering. Shortly after
graduation he joined Bell Telephone Lab-
oratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey.
"Experience has come my way in a
hurry," says Giggs. "I've worked on
carrier system amplifiers, speech trans-
mission problems, and experimental
types of coaxial cable. The Lobs are al-
ways pushing ahead, trying new ideas,
exploring new developments.
"For examnle. right now I'm working

quency barrier.' This new transistor has
a cut-off frequency of at least 500 me and
can be used to amplify 2500 separate
telephone conversations simultaneously.
It will make possible broadband, high.
frequency amplification in many fields
using subminiature components.
"There are thousands of other fascinat-
ing projects underway at the Bell Labs.
You see, at the Labs our business is new
ideas, new developments, and that's one
reason why I like working here. It's ex-
citing. If there are better ways to commu-
nicate. you can bet the Labs are lookin-

PLEASE PASS THISON
To a school teacher or a student. Applications are
now being accepted from college students and school
teachers for summer work. We are offering for the

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A

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and Williams Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr

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