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March 28, 1956 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-28

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T8E MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAI

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDA'
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DAILY
OFFICIAL
B ULLETIN
(continued from page 4)
life saving, synchronized swimming,
ballet and modern dance.
Interdepartmental Seminar on Applied
Meteorology, Thurs., March 29, 4 p.m.,
Room 4041 Natural Science Bldg. Prof.
Robert E. Dils will speak on "Meteorol-
ogy and the Hydrologic Cycle."
Doctoral Examination for Conrad
Wagner, Bioligical Chemistry; thesis:'
"The Glycogen Metabolism of Tetra-
hymena pyriformis," Wed., March 28,
133 West Medical Bldg., at 10:00 a.m.,3
Chairman, J. F. Hogg.
Doctoral Examination for Bruce Eu-
gene Edwards, Economics; thesis: "Em-
pirical Estimates of Some Regional and
Inter-Regional Input-Output Matrices,,
Wed., March 28, 101A Economics Bldg.,
at 9:00 a.m. Chairman, D. B. Suits.
Doctoral Examination for Bobby Frank
Perkins, Geology; thesis: "Biostrati-
graphic Studies in the Comanche (Cre-
taceous) Series of Northern Mexico and
Texas," Thurs., March 29, 4065 Natural
Science Bldg., at 2:00 p.m. Chairman,
L. B. Kellum.
'Events Today
My Very Own, 1955 Hopwood Award
Play of the Department of English,
written and directed by Beverly Can-
ning, Grad., will be presented by the
Department of Speech tonight at 8:00
p.m. in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Linguistics Club, 8:00 p.m. Wed., March
28, in the East Conference Room, Rack-
ham Building. Dr. S. 3D. Atkins, Univer-
sity of Princeton, will talk on "Problems
of Vedic Exegesis." Students and fac-
ulty members interested in the scientific
study of language are invited.

Exhibit Hall. "Major Religions of thei
World" and "Old Chief's Dance," March1
27-April 2. Daily at 3:00 and 4:00 p.m.,7
Including Sat, and Sun., with an extra7
showing Wed, at 12:30.1
Noon Showing Wed., 12:30 p.m., March
28, Room 4051 Administration Bldg.,
"Life in a Garden." In natural color.
Sponsored by the audio-visual education
center.
Placement Notices
The following schools will have repre-
sentatives at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments to interview teachers for positions
next September.
Wed., March 28:
Midland, Mich.-Teacher needs: Ele-
mentary; Teacher of Retarded/Dir. of
Spec. Ed.; Junior High Core; Industrial
Arts-Gen. Shop; English-Latin; High
School Driver Training; Girls Phys. Ed.;
Art: Chemistry.
Frasier, Michigan-Teacher needs: Ele-
mentary; High School Science/Chem.
and Physics; Social Studies; Industriala
Arts.
Gaines, Mich.-Teacher needs: Early
Elementary; Later Elementary; Head
Football Coach; English; Math; Indus-
trial Arts.
The representative from the Flint
Public Schools will not be here.
Thurs., March 29:
The representative from the Flint
Public Schools will not be here.
Royal Oak, Michigan-Teacher needs:
High School English; Social Studies;
Math; Science (Phys. and Biol.), man;
Art; Commercial; Mech. Drawing; Auto
Shop; Physical Ed. woman; Physical
Ed. and Asst. Coach, man.
South Lyons, Michigan -- Teacher
needs: High School Social Studies (some
P E, Assist with Football or Basketball);
Homemaking; English; Junior High
Math with Boys Basketball or Football;
Elementary (4th, 5th, 6th).
Holly, Michigan-Teacher needs: Ele-
mentary (Kdg. to 6th); Junior High
English/Social. Studies; Math Science;
High School Social Science; Shop;
French-English or French-Social Stud-
ies.
For additonal information ,nd ap-
pointments please contact the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Administration Bldg.
NO 3-1511, Ext. 489,

mer Placement Service in Room 3G,
Michigan Union, Wed., March 28, from
1 to 4:45 p.m. Types of jobs range from
Technical and Non-Technical Business
to Camps and Resorts.
U.S. Smelting Refining & Mining Co.,
Salt Lake City, Utah, is interested in
emplying students in Engineering and
Geology on underground mining work.
For further information go to the
Summer Placement Service Meeting or
call Ext. 371.
SUMMER PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Michigan Union, Room
3G, 1 to 4:45 p.m.
Wed., March 28:
Arnet Cole, Ann Arbor, YMCA Camp,
will interview for Counselors.
Mrs. H. Gross, Ann Arbor, YMCA, will
interview for Counselors.
Ronald Thompson, Chief Ta-Kee-Ko-
Mo Day Camp. Ann Arbor, will inter-
view for men and women Counselors.
Martin Gold, Camp Farband, Chelsea,
Mich. will interview for men and wo-
men Counselors.
Mrs. Barbara Lide, Field Director,
Camp Cedar Lake, Waterloo Recreation
Area, Chelsea, Mich., will interview for
women Counselors.
Stephen Baumann, Camp Conestoga,
Leonidas, Mich., will interview for men
and women Counselors.
Terry Adderle, Russell Kelly Office
Service, Detroit, will interview women
for Typists, Stenographers, General
Office Clerks to work in offices of De-
troit firms for the summer.
Sidney Weiner, Div. Supervisor, The
Easterling Co., Ann Arbor, Mich, will
interview for Salesmen,

E. and Physics for Research and Devel.I
For appointments contact the Engrg.,
Placement Office, 347 W.E., Ext. 2182.,
Representatives from the following c
will be at the Bureau of Appointments:1
Thurs., March 29:
American Motors Co., Detroit, Mich.-
man in Journalism with some experience!
in copywriting, woman with Shorthand,
Typing, and Spanish for translation
work in the Export Dept., man whose1
native language is Spanish to write
copy and translate, advertising experi-
ence helpful.
Thurs., April 12:
U.S. Civil Service-men and women
for types of positions throughout U.S.
Interviewers will be here from several
different departments.'
Pacific Mutual Life Insurance, branch-
es in various locations-men for Exec-
utive Sales Training leading to Business
Mgt.
Thurs., Fri., April 12 and 13:
Pan American World Airways-men in
LS&A and BusAd for Sales Management
Training. Must be single and not sub-
ject to draft. A group meeting will be
held on Thurs, afternoon. Individual
interviews will be held on Friday.
Fri., April 13:
Aeroquip Corp., Jackson, Mich.-men
for Sales Training.
The Kroger Co., Cleveland, Ohio head-
quarters-Men in IS&A and BusAd for
Management Training Program in Mer-
chandising, Personnel, Acctg., Mfg., Real
Estate, Warehousing, and Transporta-
tion-anywhere in 19 states.
Washington Mutual Life Insurance,
Evanston, Ill.-men and women in any
field for Salaried Sales Positions in the
Group Dept.
Marshall Field Co., Chicago, Ill.-men
and women in any field for Presuper-
visory, and Premanagerial Training in
all phases of the business: Merchandis-
ing, Non-selling, Acctg.,, Restaurants
and Foods.r
For appointments contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Ad. Bldg., Ext.
371.

OPPORTUNITIES TO
VISIT COMPANIES DURING
SPRING VACATION:
First National Bank of Chicago, Chi-
cago, Ill, extends an invitation to men
and women of the Chicago area inter-
ested in the banking field, in any de-i
partment, to visit the bank during the
spring vacation.
Saks Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y.,
welcomes any students who will be in
the New York vicinity during the Spring
Vacation to visit the Store and discuss
the Training Program open to College
Graduates.
Gimbel Brothers, Pittsburgh branch,
is developing a program for Executive
Development. Anyone interested in the
field of Retailing is welcomed to discuss
employment opportunities while in the
Pittsburgh area during Easter vacation.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad. Bldg.,
Ext. 371.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
A Government Agency in Washington,
D.C. has an opening for a man, or wo-
man who can speak Rumanian for
translation work. Must be a U.S. citizen.

Mu'sieaie Will
Be Presented
Sigma Alpha Iota, national pro-,
fessional music fraternity for
women, will present its annual
American musicale at 8:30 p.m.
today in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall.
The program will include Neff's
"Take, 0 Take Those Lips Away";
Gruffes's "By a Lonely Forest
Pathway," "Phantoms," and "We'll
to the Woods"; Copland's "Sonata
for violin and piano"; Dello Joio's
"To A Young Musician"; Neff's
"Serandea for Winds"; Barber's
"Lament"; Dello Poio's "Nocturne"
and "Sonata" and Onderdonk's
"Woodwind Quartet."
The concert is open to the public
without charge.

Y

Daily-John Hirtzel
.usyDescribes ork
ith Fossils of Michigan

l

By MARILYN WOOD
Michigan was entirely covered
with water 400 million years ago.
Land animals did. not exist then.
The animals which lived in the
sea were characteristic of a tropi-
cal or sub-tropical climate.'
Prof. Russell C. Hussey of the
geology department, is a specialist
in this particular period in geolo-
gical history.
He has found hundreds of fos-
sils from this Ordivician period in
the area of Escanaba, Michigan.
Invertebrates are extremely abund-'
ant in this area, he says.
Stacks of Vertebrates
Many fossils have been brought
back to the University's Museum of
Natural History. Stacks of verte-
brates and invertebrates- are locat-
ed there..
Most of the fossils are in lime-
stones and shales. "They are very
common in nearly all. periods,"
Prof. Hussey says.
He has done fossil hunting in
several geological periods, but most
of his work has been in the -Ordi-
vician period. "Each period has
its own problems," he says.
Periods last anywhere from 50
to 100 million years, he comment-
ed.
Prof. Hussey has found rocks
from the Ordivician period in Can-
on City, Colorado. He has also
brought rocks from this period
from southwestern Indiana, and
from along the Cumberland River
in Kentucky. The same sea which
covered Michigan at that time cov-
ered these areas also.
"It's a very wide-spread forma-
tion. Fossils are found in it ev-
erywhere," Prof. Hussey remarked.

In hunting for fossils, Prof. Hus-
sey has found a few scales that
apparently belong to a fish-like
animal. "I'm hoping to find more'
of them," he says. "It's a long.
drawn-out process and you're nev-
er quite sure what you're going to
find."
He will return to the Escanaba
area this summer to do some more
investigation.
The presence of bentonite, a
sticky clay, in the Escanaba area
suggests to Prof. Hussey that vol-
canic ash settled there during the
middle Ordivician period. Winds
must have carried the ash from
volcanoes on the Atlantic coast to
Michigan where it settled at the
bottom of the sea, the geologist
explained.
Prof. Hiussey 'began studying the
Ordivician period and collecting
fossils from it in 1921 at his Doc-
torial thesis. "And I've been work-
ing at it since then," he remarked.

PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Engrg. School:
Wed., March 28:
Aeroquip Corp., Jackson, Mich.-B.S.
in all Engrg. programs for Assist. Mgr.
of Sales Order Dept. U.S. citizen.
Thurs., March 29:
Avion Div., ACF Industries, Inc., Para-
mus, N.J.-All levels in Mech. and Elect.

SUMMER PLACEMENT:
Free Films. Museums Bldg., 4th floor There will be a meeting of the Sum-

quaIlity cle aning
Individual thorough,
expert attention

I

Playwright,

given to each garment
,s, hnt4,
I n

FREE MINOR REPAIRS:
* Trouser cuffs brushed
and tacked
* Seam-rips repaired
* Buttons replaced

Playwright Leslie Stevens will
speak on the experiences of a
young playwright in New York at
4 p.m. tomorrow in the East Con-
ference Room of the Rackham
Building.
Stevens is the author of "Bull-
fight," presented off Broadway
and "Champagne Complex," given
on Broadway. His latest play, "The
Lovers," will open for two weeks
April 2 at the Cass Theatre in
Detroit.
Also speaking will be Gfail Stein,
co-producer of "The Lovers" with
the Playwright's Company.

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COLGESUDNSWANTED!
MORE THAN 1060
RESORT HOTEL JOBS
OPEN-
Our listings give complete information on at-
tractive openings available to college students from
top A.A.A. approved resort hotels.
We can tell you the names of resort hotels who
have written us telling of their needs for college
students this summer, and the types and number of
lucrative jobs that these hotels have open for you.
These resort hotels would like to have your ap-
plication soon!
For Complete Information
Send Only $1.00 In Cash To
MR. ROBERT MILLER
College Information Service

~IpI
California Institute of Technology
JET PROPULSION_ LABORATORY
PASADENA, CALIFORNIA
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
IN THE ROCKET AND
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for
QUALIFIED GRADUATES IN
ELECTRONICS
MECHANICAL, AERONAUTICAL, CHEMICAL
ENGINEERING
METALLURGY, CHEMISTRY, PHYSICS
Graduates are urged to attend
"On Campus" Interviews

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----------------------

y

THERE WAS NO STRIKE
ON OUR BRAIN POWER!
Here are just a few of the scientific and, engineering
developments awaiting you at Westinghouse

SSo Good 0tyourThSt

t

Breaking the Steam-Pressure Barrier;: ; the first steam turbine to operate at
5000 pounds pressure has just been designed. This is double of that previously built.
Further Advances in Steam : : include completion of a $6 million ultramodern
research and development laboratory and the design of a 325,000-kw turbine generator,
the world's largest and most efficient.
Nuclear Power ; ; ; now in design is the first homogeneous or liquid-fuel reactor for
a 150,000-kw nuclear power plant. Instrumentation research is also progressing rapidly
for nuclear power plants.
Bomare ;; ; in the works is.seeker head and ground control for "Bomarc", a long-
range guided missile.
Metals Improvement ; ; ; a new $6 million metals development plant with complete
facilities for developing new metals and alloys and improving metallurgical techniques
has been opened.
Revolutionary Decision Devices ... Cypak* has been developed, which is a
switching circuit device with no moving parts for industrial applications capable of
performing millions of operations with virtually no wear.
Semiconductors; ; nearing completion is a multimillion-dollar plant for the develop-
ment and production of sub-miniature solid-state devices in the semiconductor field
which promise to revolutionize the electronic tube and rectifier industry. Silicon semi-
conductors have already been applied to aircraft control and power equipment.
Automation.;. a manufacturing laboratory for developing new production techniques
and equipment has been opened that will advance and extend automation.
Aircraft Alternator. . a brushless alternator for high altitude and high temperatures
using rotating silicon rectifiers. ; . a Westinghouse first.
Aircraft Control; : ; new Magamp* and transistor controls for aircraft power.
Doesn't This Prove That We Are Ready To Go? The list above shows just a few
of the exciting new developments under way at Westinghouse. There are new plants,
new research laboratories, new endeavors in many fields. There is room for you to grow
in many directions.

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