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March 14, 1956 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-14

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THE MCHIGAN DAILY

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Embark

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Colorado

4

I-M SPORTLIGHT I

To Defend NCAA Crown
In Ninth Annual Tourney

... by dave rorabucher

ACTIVITY WILL FLOOD the Sports Building tomorrow evening
when the twenty-fifth annual I-M Open House gets under way
with its grand gala of sports.
Hundreds of students and townspeople are expected to crowd the
building on Hoover Street to view the many and varied activities that
will mark the official windup of the winter intramural season.
The initial events will commence at 6.30 p.m. with the end of the
program coming at around 10:00.
The swimming pool and the main gymnasium will be the centers
of excitement while even the most remote nooks of the labyrinthine
structure will contain their share of spectator appeal.
Topping the program in the gym will be six championship basket-
ball games. Sigma Chi will face Phi Kappa Sigma for the fraternity 'A'
championship; the Seldom Seen Kids will battle: the Globetrotters in
the independent division; Williams will meet Strauss in the residence
halls 'A' contest; and it will be Nu Sigma Nu vs. Phi Alpha Kappa for
the pro-fraternity crown. Phi Delta Theta will meet Sigma Chi and
Gomberg will battle Williams in the 'B' championship matches.
Water Sports Featured . ..
ANf EXHIBITION of fancy and clown diving by members of the
varsity swimming team will start off activities in the pool. Following
this will be the finals of the fraternity and residence halls swimming
meets while Williams will face Cooley for the Water Polo crown.
Volleyball will feature the Turks vs. the Chinese in one of the top
battles of the year in this sport. Also included will be two games
between some of the top faculty teams.
Director Earl Riskey estimates that nearly 500 men will be com-
peting in the various events of the evening which also will feature
demonstrations and competition in squash, paddleball, tennis, code-
ball, fencing, handball, gymnastics, boxing, and wrestling, a total of
fourteen sports.
One of top exhibitions of the evening will undoubtedly be in
squash where the several matches are billed simply as-the Detroit
Squash Club vs. the University of Michigan. Various students and
faculty members will comprise the Michigan aggregation, giving
spectators a chance to become acquainted with this fast and hard-
fought sport.
Fencing will feature exhibition matches with the epee, foil and
sabre weapons following which will be exhibition boxing bouts.
The state doubles championship team of John Scopis and Harold
Kutnick will participate in a handball exhibition match while three
matches in the unusual sport of codeball will be featured in adjoining
courts.
Varsity Members' Included .. .
WRESTLING, GYMNASTICS, AND TENNIS will feature demonstra-
tions and exhibitions by members of the varsity and freshman
squads. Residexlce hall and fraternity matches will be held in paddle-
ball throughout the evening.
The history behind the idea of the Open House is a long and
interesting one. Originally begun in 1928 as a means of attracting
interest in the "new" Sports Building the program has been continued
every year save for a brief period during the second World War.
Now celebrating its silver anniversary the annual event has grown
into a mammoth production which highlights the intramural program.
Weeks of preparation go into the planning of the popular affair
and the spectator generally finds himself torn between two or more
,concurrent events throughout the evening. ,
Programs will be available listing the time schedule and location
of all events on the program and the respective titles at stake.
AEPi's, Phi Gams Cop
Second Place Crowns

By DICK CRAMER
Michigan and Michigan Tech
join their Eastern rivals aboard the
"Broadmoor Special" today at 1
p.m. bound for this weekend's cli-
mactic NCAArhockey playoffs at
Colorado Springs.
Local fans will have their last
chance to see the WIHL represen-
tativestto thednationaltourney
when the squads leave from the
Union for Willow Run Airport at
11:30 this morning.
Coach Vic Heyliger's Wolverines
will be traveling to their ninth
consecutive NCAA tournament.
They will be defending the cham-
pionship which they won last year
for the fifth time.
Grey To Represent Daily
Hockey Editor Dave Grey will
continue a long Daily tradition
by flying to Colorado Springs to
send back a first hand report of
playoff proceedings.
There will be ample opportunity
for Michigan to accustom itself
to the rarefied Colorado atmos-
phere before opening its battle to
cop the crown for the sixth time.
Its semi-final contest is not until
Friday night against St. Lawrence.
Tomorrow evening the first of
the East-West semi-finals will be-

gin the three-day spectacle. Michi-
gan Tech takes on Boston College
for the opportunity to face the
Michigan-St. Lawrence winner in
Saturday night's championship
battle.
Before leaving for the Broad-
moor, Tech and Michigan utilized
two days of practice on Coliseum
ice. The Huskies remained in Ann
Arbor after their humiliating
losses to therWolverines last week-
end.
Besides several practice sessions
in Ann Arbor, most of the Tech
squad spent some time with their
studies. Coach Al Renfrew ad-
ministered makeup exams to the
Huskies, long absent from classes.
Cigar Included
Renfrew, a facsimile of his
brother-in-law, Wolverine coach
Heyhiger-even to the extent of
smoking a worn cigar-looked for-
ward at yesterday's practice to his
team's first NCAA appearance.
"Just going out there is a great
experience in itself," commented
the Tech mentor. Obviously, his
hopes of taking the championship
from Michigan-four-time van-
quisher of 'his squad-were not too
strong.
Meanwhile, before leaving, Hey-
liger tried to be noncommital
about his team's chances, but with
most of his Wolverines veterans
of the Broadmoor classic, Michigan
cannot avoid being considered "the
team to beat."

4

4'

PRACTICING for the last time at the Coliseum yesterday morning
are the Michigan Tech Huskies who, with Michigan, leave today to
represent the Western Intercollegiate Hockey League in the NCAA
tournament at Colorado Springs. Tech remained in Ann Arbor
following its two losses to Michigan last weekend. This afternoon
the Huskies and Wolverines join the Eastern delegates to the
NCAA playoffs, Boston College and St. Lawrence, aboard the
"Broadmoor Special." The "Special" is a chartered plane which
carries all four semi-finalist teams to Colorado for the three-day
tourney at the Broadmoor Ice Palace. At Colorado, besides the
all-important hockey contests, there will be full scale festivities
honoring the squads chosen to play in the playoffs.

A

SECOND STRAIGHT YEAR:
Dons Top Final AP Basketball Poll,

By The Associated Press
The University of San Francisco
Dons, unbeaten 'this season and
sporting a gaudy 51-straight re-'
cord, are the nation's No. 1 college
basketball team for the second
consecutive year.
That was the verdict yesterday
in the final nationwide poll of The
Associated Press.
San Francisco never let the ex-
perts down, for they predicted in
a preseason poll that the Dons
were of championship caliber, and
they ranked No. 1 in every weekly
poll since early December.
The Dons, who were voted No. 1
a year ago and then went on to
prove it by copping the NCAA
tournament, have another tough
tourney round ahead of them
starting Friday when they clash

with UCLA, Pacific Coast Confer-
ence champions.
North Carolina State wound up
as the No. 2 team on the basis of
games through Saturday, March
10.
A total of 132 sports writers and
sportscasters cast ballots in the
final poll, and San Francisco re-
ceived 66 first place votes. On the
basis of 10 for first, 9 for second,
etc., the Dons rolled up 1,161
points. N. C. State had nine votes
for first, and 809 points.
This is the eighth annual AP
basketball poll.
The top teams with first place
votes and won-lost records in pa-'
rentheses:
1. San Francisco 66 (25-0) 1,161
2. N.C. State ... 9 (24-3) 809
3. Dayton ...... 2 (23-3) 786

4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10,
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Iowa ........
Alabama..
Louisville
SMU ........
UCLA .....
Kentucky ...
Illinois . ....
Okla. City ..
Vanderbilt ..
N. Carolina
Holy Cross
Temple,....
Wake Forest .
Duke .......
Utah .......
Okla. A.&M. .
W. Virginia ..

8 (17-5)
27 (21-3)
2 (23-3)
3 (22-2)
1 (21-5)
2 (19-5)
(18-4)
8 (18-6)
(19-3)
(18-5)
1 (22-4)
(23-3)
(19-9)
(10-7)
(21-5)
1 (18-8)
1 (21-8)

755
712
551
450
315
282
257
168
154
143
121
87
77
56
541
47
45

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Special Course for College Women
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"SLIPPER-FREE WHERE YOUR FOOT BENDS'
(Style-concealed roominess across the ball of the foot)
State Street on the Campus
for the
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of

5
t

SOlympic Wrestling To Use
Unusual Grappling Styles,

GRAPEFRUIT LEAGUE SCORES
Milwaukee 13, Brooklyn 0
Boston 4, Detroit 0
Cleveland 11, Chicago (N) 7
Chicago (A) 9, Washington 2
New York (A) 3, Boston 2
Cincinnati 9, Philadelphia 0
Cleveland 11, Chicago (N) 8
New York (N) 7, Baltimore d
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REPARING
Prompt Service
Quality Workmanship
Fully Guaranteed
HALLER S
Jewelers - 717 N. Univ. .
Near the Auditorium O

I

I

.-" . .3
--...« «.. 3

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.j

.-.

In an exciting night of basket-
ball, six playoff titles were decided
in the IM competition at the
Sports Building last night.
The battles were for second,
third and fourth place crowns in
both the 'A' and 'B' division for
social fraternities.
In a game that was close until
late in the second half, Phi Gam-
maDelta topped Phi';Kappa Sigma,
40-30 in the second place 'B' game.
On the strength of a last second
basket, the half-time score was
16-15 in favor of the Phi Gains and
with the help of Keith Coates' 10
points they widened the margin at
the game's end. Marshall Wads-
worthscored 12 for the losers.
In a very, low scoring contest,
Alpha Epsilon Pi edged Lambda
Chi Alpha, 22-20 as both teams had
trouble in shooting. The score was
tied at the half, 6-6 and no more
than four points ever separated the
two teams. Late in the second per-
iod the AEPi's managed to grab;
the lead and held it the rest of
the way. Buddy Seligsohn and Don
Mazin were high for the winners
with eight apiece.
In the third place 'A' game, Zeta
Beta Tau romped to a 48-22 vic-
tory over Chi Phi. As the second
half opened, ZBT pumped in 13
straight points before the Chi Phi
was able to score. Stan Alfred of
ZBT was high man for the-game
with 27 tallies.
Psi Upsilon scored first and never

relinquished the lead as it downed
Delta Upsilon, 51-34 to take the
third place 'B' contest.
Theta Chi took an easy 49-23
win from Zeta Psi in the fourth
place 'A' game as Duane Willse
tallied 18 points, 14 of them com-
ing in the second half.
Phi Kappa Psi rounded 'out the
evening by beating Alpha Sigma
Phi, 44-31 in the fourth place 'B'
contest. Niles Kinnunen added 12
to the winners' total.

By HANK ROSENBAUM
Fighting on the other fellow's
terms is always a disadvantage.
The Olympic wrestlers from the
United States will find this out
when they compete in the free-
style and Greco-Roman wrestling
championships in the Olympic
Games at Melbourne, Australia
November 22 through December 8.
Rules governing Olympic wrest-
ling have been set up by the Inter-
national Amateur Wrestling Fed-
eration and are quite different
from those followed in high schools
and colleges throughout the U.S.
The matches are 15 minutes long,

Jenlins Brothers To Star
In Local Ice Club's Show

Hayes Alan Jenkins, Ilen's
Olympic figure skating champion,
and his brother, David, will be in
Ann Arbor this Sunday.
The two spectacular brothers
will be featured here for this
weekend'; Ann Arbor Figure Skat-
ing Club's annual ic.; show, "Mel-
ody on Ice."
Regular performances of the
show are scheduled for 8 p.m.
Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday at
the Coliseum. Club members have
said that the Jenkins brothers,
however, will not be able to at-
tend Saturday night's perform-
ance.
To avoid the expected problem

of -an overflow crowd on Sunday
afternoon, a special exhibition of
the two Olympic stars has been
planned for 6:15 p.m. Sunday.
Club officials emphasized that
only club members and their fam-
ilies and Saturday night ticket
holders will be admitted to this
performance.
Ticket holders must retain their
stubs for admittance and club
members must show U.S. Figure
Skating Association membership
cards.
At the regular 3 p.m. show on
Sunday, the two brothers will pre-'
sent their Olympic free skating
programs.,

a full six minutes longer than in
American wrestling, but they move
at a slower pace and to some de-
gree lack the color of the U.S.
style.
The object is to touch the op-
ponent's shoulders to the mat in-
stead of holding them there for a
full two seconds so it is relatively
easier for the man having the hold
to lose the match.
Bouts are not decided upon
pointuevaluation but upon the
decision of three judges. Little em-
phasis is placed upon escapes,
takedowns, or riding time, in fact
excessive riding is considered akin
to stalling tactics.
Free-style wrestling is the most
widely used in the U.S. although
a few universities such -as the Uni-
versity of Toledo teach the Greco-
Roman style.
The big difference between the
two is that Greco-Roman does not
allow grapplers to use their feet
and legs and no holds below the
waist are legal.
Olympic wrestling tryouts will
soon be held starting with the re-
gional tournaments and culminat-
ing in the finals at Los Angeles,
California.
The regional tryouts for this area
will take place April 13-14 in
Michigan State Normal College's
huge new field house at Ypsilanti.
1.
BEHIND
G R IN D
T H 9

ill

Cu mmon
having a
build up

11

with a Golden Apples

'I

ELECTRICAL,
ENGINEERS
AND
PHYSICISTS

children! We're
treat. 11 'just
those vitamins

-

I

4'

H UGH E S

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT LABORATORIES
Culver City, Los Angeles County, California-Tucson, Arizona

(

HUGHES ANNOUNCES
OPENINGS ON ITS "STAFFS
FOR THOSE RECEIVING
B.S., M.S. OR PH.D.
DEGREES DURING THE
COMING YEAR.

MARCH 16
MEMBERS OF THE HUGHES ENGINEERING
STAFF WILL CONDUCT PERSONAL
INTERVIEWS ON YOUR CAMPUS.
CONSULT YOUR SCHOOL PLACEMENT
OFFICE NOW FOR APPOINTMENT.

..dmmft

FIRST ANNUAL I.H.C. DANCE
March 17th Michigan League
FTHE RITE OF SPRING"
mnusic by
HAL SINGER AND ORCHESTRA

OPENINGS ARE IN THESE FIELDS:
for work in
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
Airborne Radar Systems, Servomechanisms, Computers,
Systems Analysis, Guided Missile Systems,
Automatic Controls, Physical Analysis, Microwave Tubes,
Pulse Circuitry, Information Theory, Ground Radar Systems,
Solid-State Physics, Transistors, Test Equipment Design,
Miniaturization, Electromechanical Design, Gyros,
Hydraulics, Subminiaturization, Mechanical Design,
Instrunentation, Telemetering, Antennas, Wave Guides.

4

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