100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 13, 1956 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*/

1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

Adams

Wins

B' Second Place

itle

Men-no-Mice, Wenley Cop
Other Cage Crowns in I-M

rr3rrrr Ie~v... EELES LA_______

DON'T
;s you are
Pre-Med
ident
interested
Medicine

READ
Ti.lS

11

By AL JONES

Adams Mouse claimed the resi-
dence hall second place 'B' team
crown in intramural basketball ac-
tion last night with a 22-12 victory
over VanTyne.
Joel Koenig and Bill Lewis paced
Adams' scoring with six points
each in a slow, cautiously played
game. David Maker was also high
with six for VanTyne.
Men-no-Mice Top Evans
In the independent league Men-
no-Mice triumphed over the Evans
Scholars in a very close see-saw
game, 30-28.

Scoring balance,
starters hitting for

with all five
at least two

144-37 win. Lou Lemack was Iiigh
for the victors with 16 points while
Bob Solotaroff dropped in 10 for
Winchell..
VanTyne romped over Huber,
41-25, in the fourth place residence
hall 'A' playoffs via 16 points by
Jim Van Wagoner and 14 more by
Dick Miller. In the fifth place
finals, Michigan House triumphed
over Allen-Rumsey, 34-17.
In the residence hall 'B' league,
Scott House took the third place
title from Michigan House with a
26-23 victory sparked by Hank
Taylor, 37-27, in the fourth place
playoffs with eight points each by
Jerry Johnston and Melvin Kai.-
j ala.
Sudden-Death Victory
In independent league play, the
Eaglehawkers slipped by the Bac-
teriology team, 33-31, in a sudden-
death overtime period to win the
fourth place crown. The game was
close all the way. John Duane and
John Hummon bagged 16 and 12
points, respectively, for the win-
ners, while Eugene Whithouse cag-
ed nine for the Bacteriologists.
In a semi-final game of the
second place playoffs of the pro-
fessional fraternity league, Delta
Sigma Delta smashed Alpha Kappa
Kappa, 40-26
The I-M open house Thursday
evening will feature the first place
finals in all divisions.

Wayne Advances
FORT WAYNE (RP)-Scrappy
Wayne provided the first upset
of the NCAA basketball tour-.
nament by outfighting a taller
DePaul team here last night,
72-43.
baskets, paid off for Men-no-Mice
as they took an early lead. Evans
Scholars, led by Bill Klink's 14
points, .tied the game midway in
the second half, only to fall victim
of another Men-no-Mice rally.
In residence hall 'A' games, Wen-
ley grabbed the third place crown
from Winchell with a well-played

EELES LANDSTROM
... "Flying Finn" -
'Ski Club .plans
Colorado Trip
Plans are progressing for the
Ullr Ski Club to spend Spring
Vacation at Aspen, Colorado.
Final arrangements for the trip
will be made tomorrow at 2012
Washtenaw. The informal meeting
will begin at 8 p.m.
Any persons who have not yet
made reservations, but who are
interested in making the trip to
Colorado, should call Mary Hawk-
ins, NO 2-3153 before tomorrow
evening.

By JIM BENAGH
Everyone in the crowd viewing
the 1956 Big Ten Indoor track meet
focused their attention on Michi-
gan's big Finnish pole vaulter,
Eeles Landstrom, as he roared
down the runway, and went up
and over the bar with ease.
Landstrom had just broken the
Jenison Field House record at East
Lansing, and the partisan fans re-
sponded with one of the day's
finest ovations.
But for Landstrom this leap of
14'2" was just another addition to
the archives. The "flying Finn"
has bettered 14'9" on one occasion,
14'8" on another, and 14'7" at least
three other times.
The Michigan sophomore will
seek more laurels when he repre-
sents Finland in the 1956 Olympics
as a member of the Finnish armed
forces. After 1956 Michigan spring
season, he will leave for Finland
to serve in the armed forces -- a
surprising knock for Wolverine
track followers to digest.
Landstrom announced, however,
that he will be back here in spring
of 1958, when he will begin his

junior year. At the present time,
the 24-year-old is nearing the end
of a deferment.
The trip to Melbourne will be
Landstrom's second crack at the
rugged Olympic competition. His
first chance was in 1952 when Fin-
land hosted the games.
Eeles was thrown into the pack
of Olympians as a decathalon man
and finished about 14th among
28 contenders, despite lack of prac-
tice.
"Competing in the Olympics has
been my biggest thrill, you know,"
he says with a Scandinavian ac-
cent. "All the people in a little
country expect you to do only your
best performance all the time, you

know, so you just have to try
harder."
He went on to tell about the
pride his country takes in track.
The best vauer in European
history, Eeles did not come to
Michigan just for track. He is
thinking seriously of making a
career of television, and wants to
help his native land establish its
first station. He is enrolled in
pre-business studies.
The popular 611/2", 178-1b. vault-
er is a good friend of the president
of Finland, also a former athlete.
Eeles participates in many other
sports, and is a member of the
three-time Finnish baseball cham-
pions.
WVORDS
OF COUNSEL,
A miracle is performed
u ien you t ruSt your hair to
715 N. University

Unles
1.A
Stu
2.Or
in

TON IG HT:
Auditorim
7:30-8:30
DR. RE ED .I A
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon,
will lecture on PLASTIC SURGERY
with slides demonstrating conditions
BEFORE and AFTER Sur er
This lecture is sponsored by the Pre-Medical Society
and is OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

SCORES
NCAA CAGE PLAYOFFS
Canisius 79, N. C. State 78
Temple 74, Holy Cross 72
Wayne 72, DePaul 63
Morehead 107, Marshall 92
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
New York (N) 9, Baltimore 5
Cleveland 7, Chicago (N) 6
Philadelphia 5, Pittsburgh 1
Kansas City 7, Boston 4
New York (A) 4, Chicago (A) 2
Cincinnati 3, St. Louis 1

1

dJ EAMWOIIV"NEW °J =CRUADE9

19

ntwr

Y.==

-I

T HE development of a new airplane such as the Crusader, the World's Fastest
Navy Fighter, cannot be credited to any one engineer. Each engineer, how-
ever, is invaluable because this truly new high-performance airplane is only the
final result of the creative thought and teamwork of a large number of engineers.

Available at

WILDWLD'S
State Street on the Campus

1

I3
_t11 Opportunity
for technical graduates with Goodyear
Representatives of The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company will be
here on the date shown below to interview Seniors who will receive
B.S. or'advanced degrees in the following fields of technical study:

The individual ideas of each engineer are most
important. In aircraft design, the time lag between
discovery and the utilization of knowledge is
extremely short, shorter perhaps than in any other
major industry. The solut ns to the most stimu-
lating problems which arise in the industry are
frequently dependent upon the daily utilization of
new ideas and new knowledge.
The graduating engineer considering his first
career decision may choose whether he will enter
this field of work - the design of airplanes and
missiles - that progresses hand in hand with new
discoveries in all facets of science and engineering,
or choose a less aggressive industry. Of course, it
follows logically that greater and more rapid ad-
vancement opportunities lie in a field that does not
stagnate, in a field that is bounded by the creative
imagination of man alone. At Chance Vought, air-
craft design draws capable engineers to positions
of greater responsibility in developing new ideas
and supervising the additional technical manpower
needed to "practicalie" the ideas. Starting sala-
ries are commensurate with education and expe-
rience for partieuer- specialization and are also
competitive with other industries as well as
other companies. Advancement, as one would

expect, is based upon demonstrated performance,
not seniority.
The future of the aircraft industry is equal to, if
not brighter than, that of other industries. The
complexity of modern aircraft and missiles, the
investigation of new fields of knowledge as air-
craft fly higher and faster, the possibilities of
man's further use of science and engineering for
conquest of the air in the second half of the 20th
century, all emphasize the challenge and oppor-
tunity to the young graduate.
We urge the graduating engineer to investigate
these opportunities at Chance Vought. He will
find a stable, 38-year-old aircraft designer and
builder with young ideas, a designer and builder
noted for advancing the state-of-the-art of air-
craft and guided missile design. He will discover
that Chance Vought offers career opportunities,
not merely impressive titles, and that he will
join an engineering organization that thinks
and operates as a team rather than as a random
collection of individual engineers.
We have the usual fringe benefits including an ex-
cellent graduate study program, group insurance,
retirement income plan, paid vacation, sick leave,
moving allowance, and numerous paid holidays:

{$', ,: 2;.' ± fir.; :+ 'kr;' a' ° ' aa; '$: y

.~.'3.

OW-1

wammmmaw4waffmommov

CHEMICAL MECHANICAL
ENGINEERING ENGINEERING
p. r.

ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING

amm

w
gem

umm s

9

msmaagemmmm__ ~

CIVIL
INDUSTRIALCIL
ENGINEERING ENGINEERING
There's a-career for YOU at Goodyear contact
in anv of tha following fieldt- office n

CHEMISTr
your student placement
w - plan now to have a

We invite you to discuss your opportunities at Chance Vought with
M. G. Starr

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan