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March 09, 1956 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-09

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TH MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1958

THE ~IIICIIIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, MARCH 9,1956

of. Butts
rticipates
Lectures

monopoly for public and pri-
e schools' cannot be created by
Ividual states, Prof. 4. Freeman
ts said yesterday.
'articipating in the annual His-
y of Education lecture, the Col-
bia University faculty member
i that states do not have the
it to create either a monopoly
public education by destroying
rate school, nor to create a
nopoly for private schools by
dermining or destroying their
n public schools..
le pointed out that private
ools arefree to exist and par-
s are free to sendttheir children
them. Public schools must be
intained by the states in order
t free public education may be
ilable to all.
3iscussing religious freedom,
f. Butts said, "the principle of
rty requires that public schools
st be free of sectarian religious
ttrol. Even the effort to pro-
te religion in general is a threat
the religious freedom of same,"
asserted.
he educator continued, "the
eral government does not have
right to direct control over
te schools except to protect the
nciples of freedom equality."
le added that although the fed-
I government does not have the
hit to manage state school sys-
as, it can give financial support
states for their public schools
ping them offer equal educa-
nal opportunities to all,
tic To Meet
On Counseling
['wenty-five Michigan schools
I be represented at the Pro-
sional Clinic on Guidance and
tinseling to be held today and
norrow.
the Clinic which is being spon-
ed by the Department of Guid-
ce and Counseling of the edu-
Aon school will begin at-12:30
a. today at the Union.
the first general session wrn
en at 1:30 p.m. with Harlan.C.
ch, assistant dean of the Grad-
e School acting as chairman.
C. Hulslander, lecturer in vo-
ional guidance, and Blanche
ulson, supervisor of the Bureau
Counseling Services of the Chi-
o Public Schools will speak
the afternoon meeting.
Discussion sessions, a dinner and
concluding luncheon Saturday
on are also scheduled for the
>-day conference.

--Daily-vern Soden
HYPNOTIC DIET--All Mary Foree, '59, can do is read about
Sweets.. Ever since Hypnotist Franz Polgar worked on her three
weeks ago, she has had no taste for them whatsoever. And,
with seven weeks left in her hypnotic diet, she's been losing
weight, too.
Girl Hypnotized by Polgar
Loses 10 Pounds 'Sensibly'

Reds' Rights
Apply to Air
Russia might~ legally object to
having the proposed earth satel-
lite cross over her skies, it was
suggested recently by Prof. Wil-
liam W. Bishop, Jr., of the Uni-
versity Law School.
In an interview with radio sta-
tion WUOM the professor said that
the present consensus traditional-
ly has been to extend national
sovereignty upwards almost in-
definitely.
This has been based on the fact
that objects dropped from planes
would fall to earth, from no matter
what height they fell, and that
there are possibilities for espion-
age from high altitudes with mod-
ern optical equipment.
At present tblere is no established
authority on how high is "up"
for legal purposes. Some experts
have suggested it be set at an
altitude of 160,000 miles-the point
at which the sun's gravitational
pull would prevent objects from
returning to the earth.
Prof. Bishop favors setting the
limit several hundred miles up
and working out provisions for
satellites and weather balloons on
a reciprocal basis.
Tadlky Named
To FH3A Post
Bob Talley, '58, was named gen-
eral chairman in charge of all
committees of Fraternity Buying
Association this week,
Talley has previously served as
purchasing agent of FBA.
Chairmen of the individual com-
mittees of the organization have
also been picked. Among them
are. Charles Rubin, '58, Informa-
tion and Public Relations; Brooks
Sitterley, '58, Pricing Committee;
Don Reeves,'58, Office Committee;
and Ed Freeman, '58 and Roger
Sjolund, '58, Ordering Commit-
tee.
Ken Anderson, '58, has been ap-
pointed chairman in charge of
tryouts.

(Continued from Page 1)
ments on North Campus should.
free apartments for undergradu-
ate students.
Erection of new dorms probably
won't help much-it will simply
absorb the proportionate increase,
in student enrollment.
. City Helping;
Ann Arbor Building Inspector
John Ryan claims the city is doing
yhat it can to encourage building
and renting.
Students oftimes believe collus-
ion between landlords and city
authorities is responsible for the
housing shortage. It is doubtful
such is the case.
Ryan said the zoning laws were
liberal for both building and rent-
ing. Recently amended, they per-
mit roomers in zones A and AA.
Further, Ryan said no builders
or developers have ever complain-
ed of zoning restrictions and that
if they did "consideration would
be given to changing restrictions
for any reasonable project."
Lenient Building Code
The Ann Arbor building code
was termed by Ryan, "One of the
most lenient in the country. We
set minimum. standards for good
building. They were set up to en-
courage new building."
Ryan attributed the high cost
of real estate and building to the
cost of land.*"There are very few
vacant lots in the city and the
available land is costly to develop."
An estimated 10 to 12 thousand
apartments exist in Ann Arbor for
students. New building is going up
at the rate of four units per day,
according to Ryan.
Last year building permits for
1033 new dwelling units were
issued by the building department.
Reason for the lack of new

It was three weeks ago today
that Dr. Franz Polgar hypnotized
Mary Foree, '59, and told her that,
over a period of ten weeks, "she
would lose weight sensibly."
Since that Friday evening, she
has become ten pounds lighter,
and is in hopes of losing still more
weight.
Actually, she says she doesn't
remember anything Polgar, the
renowned hypnotist, told her dur-
ing his one-night show in Hill
Auditorium.,
Her friends, however, supplied'
her with the instructions that
Polgar gave her. He said that she
would lose weight slowly and
sensibly over a ten-week period
and that during this time she
would have no taste for sweets.
Her sister, Phoebe Foree, '58,
expressed wonder at the hypnotic
diet. "I don't know just how much
influence he had, on her," she
commented.
Mary Foree has dieted before,
her sister explained, and has lost
weight.
But for the last three weeks,
she has had no taste for sweets.
As for desserts, "It's just like sec-
ond nature. I never take them,"
she explained.
"I just don't have the urge to
eat them," she said.
Miss Foree had to take some
teasing and kidding, for the first
few days, but she says that it has
all stopped now.

New Building May Ease
Exhorbitant Rent Rates

'I

No one stops her in the hall
anymore and says; "Aren't you the
one who was hypnotized?"
After losing ten pounds as of
yesterday, Miss Foree is looking
forward to losing twenty more
pounds in the next seven weeks of
her hypnotic dieting.
Cadets Honored
Chris McKenney, '56BAd., of Ann
Arbor and Thomas Bailey, '57E,
of Detroit were presented the Chi-
cago Tribune Air Force ROTC
Gold and Silver annual awards
Wednesday afternoon.
The medals were given tb the
two cadets by Col. William H.
Parkhill, Prof. of Air Science, in
recognition of high academic
achievement and for outstanding
qualities of leadership.

building in the face of the short-
age is, according to Ryan, the
rapidity with which the situation
has developed.
"This time next year we should
know better'where we stand," he
commented.
"During the war there was a
severe shortage but -no one built
because it was expected to be
temporary. But it's just gotten
worse," Ryan claimed.
Ryan said he thought the City
Council had done as much as they
could to encourage building.
None of this helps the student
paying exorbitant prices. Only a
reasonable degree of integrity on
the part of the landlords renting
at these prices can help the short-
run situation.
University building projects, the
new zoning laws and the new
building code may help ease the
long-run burden.
INTERVIEWS
FOR CAREERS
WITH HERCULES
Here's an opportunity for
a career with one of the
nation's most rapidly ex-
panding chemical com-
panies. If you will have a
BS or MS degree in ...
" CHEMISTRY
" ENGINEERING
Chemical
Civil Mechanical
Electrical Mining
.a Hercules representative
will be on the campus tc
discuss with you employ-
ment opportunities in...
" RESEARCH
" SALES
" PRODUCTION
* ENGINEERING
Arrangements for inter-
views should be made
through your placement
office.
HERCULES POWDER COMPANY
INCORPORATED
Wilmington 99, Del.
MARCH 19th

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Design and Development work for the
Central Engrg. Dept.
Hurley Hospital, Flint, Mich., has an
opening for a Credit Manager.
EXAMINATION ANNOUNCEMENT:
U.S. Civil Service Commission announ-
ces another Federal Service Entrance
Exam. to be given on April 14. Appli-
cations must be postmarked by March
22. These exams qualify men and wo-
men for various positions in admin.,
Pers., mgt., econ., etc. on the Junior
or Trainee level.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 371.

i

YOU NEEDN'T 4
9Ras *35 with
PURCHASE
CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University NO 8-6972
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Read the Classilieds

STOP IN
THIS

WEEK-END

..... .;. .....M .a::...

REPAIRS ON ALL MAKES OF BICYCLES
WHIZZER MOTOR SALES
Corner Main and Madison.. . Phone NOrmandy 8-7187
"OPEN MONDAY NIGHT" till 9:00
Only 4 Blocks West of the Law Quad

;.
;>
eiti
r.:;:
fi :t
'ci
:
i

ABSOLUTELY
NOTHING
LIKE IT!"
the N EW
" '# Y with .
B -O
PURCHASE
CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University NO 8-6972
"Purchase from Purchase"

I

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JA1J
t3
CAFE
T he most popular
Oriental eating place in town
1 Specializing this
week-end in HMa,
Turkey and Duck.
Orders to take out -
across the street.
Free Parking in Gas Station
Phone NO 2-5624
t.
118 West Liberty
Open 11 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Closed Mondays

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